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Curt Flood

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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
Curt Flood received 71 votes in his last year of Hall of Fame eligibility. The man who started baseball's economic revolution was named on about 15 percent of the ballots cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and so will get a footnote instead of a plaque for a courageous effort that brought him more pain than fame.Flood was the first player to mount a serious legal challenge to Major League Baseball's reserve clause, which allowed teams to hold indefinite contractual control over their players.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
"The Curious Case of Curt Flood" could hardly be more timely. The compelling documentary about the St. Louis Cardinals all-star centerfielder who made free agency possible for major league baseball players arrives Wednesday night on HBO in the middle of our summer of sports discontent with the NFL and NBC players and owners at each throats. The film reminds that as much as we might like to lose ourselves in the games aspects of professional sports, the owners are still management, and the players are still labor, and with billions of dollars at stake it is never just about the games.
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SPORTS
By Gordon Edes and Gordon Edes,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 25, 1995
CLEVELAND -- So far, he has tolerated the chemotherapy; the second cycle began Monday. But now Curt Flood is to undergo radiation for throat cancer tomorrow morning, and the doctors say he cannot skip the treatment.So Curt Flood hopes his friend of 50 years, Vada Pinson, will understand if he is unable to make it to Oakland for Pinson's funeral that day."Vada would say, 'You did what? Get out of here,' " Flood said yesterday from his home in Los Angeles, where he looks up from the phone and every day sees the same picture on the wall: Vada Pinson, Curt Flood and Lou Brock on a framed cover of the Sporting News.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2007
A year ago, one of baseball's most prolific home run hitters decided he'd rather quit playing than lower himself to accepting a minor league contract. Later this month, Sammy Sosa will report to spring training with the Texas Rangers because he would rather accept a minor league contract than quit playing. Sosa, 38, reportedly will earn $500,000 if he makes the Opening Day roster, plus an additional $2 million if he meets all his incentives. He's 12 home runs shy of 600 for his career, which seemed as out of reach during his one season with the Orioles in 2005 as the balls he once launched into upper decks throughout the majors.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 29, 1997
There are, in my view, very few genuine sports heroes. My favorites are the ones who are noteworthy not for the sports they played, but for what they did outside the athletic arena.One of these is Muhammad Ali, pugilist par excellence who defied federal authorities in their attempt to draft him into the Army so he could - at least tacitly - support an unjust and unpopular war in Vietnam. When he refused induction into the Army in April of 1967, Ali made the leap from superb boxer to folk hero.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1997
Former major-league outfielder Curt Flood, who put his career on the line to challenge baseball's reserve clause, died yesterday of throat cancer at the age of 59.Flood, a three-time All-Star and a seven-time Gold Glove winner, was one of the best center fielders in the game when he sued baseball in 1970 in a vain attempt to overturn a long-standing provision in the Major League Agreement that bound each player to his team for the length of his career....
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
ATLANTA -- The Major League Baseball Players Association and Major League Baseball have received a letter signed by two U.S. senators and a senator-elect that outlines the damage that the labor dispute will cause in Florida and Arizona and threatens unspecified legislative action if it is not resolved.Sen. John McCain of Arizona, Sen.-elect John Kyl of Arizona and Sen. Connie Mack of Florida signed the letters, which also made reference to the pending re-examination of baseball's antitrust exemption.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The TV ratings for this World Series might be disappointing, but there's one reason for the nation to feel melancholy when this is over. Detroit Tigers manager Jim Leyland won't be around to quote until February. Leyland, the chain-smoking, gravel-voiced baseball lifer, steals the spotlight every time he sits in front of a microphone and spouts his truisms about life and sport. Here are some of his best comments from pre-game yesterday - when Leyland was on a roll - with a few of his Series' greatest hits sprinkled in. Leyland on how to get Placido Polanco to start hitting after the second baseman went hitless in the first three games: "I have no clue.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | January 27, 1997
NEW YORK -- Curt Flood was treated as a hero when he died last week two days after his 59th birthday. That was nice, but many of the people praising his guts now are the same ones who vilified him and then ignored him when he sued the owners of professional baseball rather than accept a trade from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies.He challenged the bosses, and they destroyed him with the help of other players (employees) and the sports press now saying how heroic he was.''I am a man, not a consignment of goods to be bought and sold,'' he said in 1970, suing for the right to change employers.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 7, 1997
If you're looking for someone to feel sorry for this weekend, besides the coaches and players on teams whose holds on NCAA tournament bids rest precariously, have some pity on whoever drew short straw in the ESPN sound engineering department.That poor person will not only have to listen in on Dick Vitale and Digger Phelps, who will be manning the studio through the end of "Championship Week," but also Louisiana State men's coach Dale Brown as soon as the Tigers are knocked out of the Southeastern Conference tournament.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The TV ratings for this World Series might be disappointing, but there's one reason for the nation to feel melancholy when this is over. Detroit Tigers manager Jim Leyland won't be around to quote until February. Leyland, the chain-smoking, gravel-voiced baseball lifer, steals the spotlight every time he sits in front of a microphone and spouts his truisms about life and sport. Here are some of his best comments from pre-game yesterday - when Leyland was on a roll - with a few of his Series' greatest hits sprinkled in. Leyland on how to get Placido Polanco to start hitting after the second baseman went hitless in the first three games: "I have no clue.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight For Free Agency in Professional Sports Brad Snyder Viking / 472 pages / $25.95. In 1969, after 12 years as an outstanding outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, Curt Flood learned from a sportswriter that he had been traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. The next day a form preprinted on an index card made it official. "If I had been a foot-shuffling porter," Flood fumed, "they might have at least given me a pocket watch." With roots in St. Louis, including a portrait and photography business, Flood opted to forgo his $90,000 salary and retire.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 7, 1997
If you're looking for someone to feel sorry for this weekend, besides the coaches and players on teams whose holds on NCAA tournament bids rest precariously, have some pity on whoever drew short straw in the ESPN sound engineering department.That poor person will not only have to listen in on Dick Vitale and Digger Phelps, who will be manning the studio through the end of "Championship Week," but also Louisiana State men's coach Dale Brown as soon as the Tigers are knocked out of the Southeastern Conference tournament.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 29, 1997
There are, in my view, very few genuine sports heroes. My favorites are the ones who are noteworthy not for the sports they played, but for what they did outside the athletic arena.One of these is Muhammad Ali, pugilist par excellence who defied federal authorities in their attempt to draft him into the Army so he could - at least tacitly - support an unjust and unpopular war in Vietnam. When he refused induction into the Army in April of 1967, Ali made the leap from superb boxer to folk hero.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | January 27, 1997
NEW YORK -- Curt Flood was treated as a hero when he died last week two days after his 59th birthday. That was nice, but many of the people praising his guts now are the same ones who vilified him and then ignored him when he sued the owners of professional baseball rather than accept a trade from the St. Louis Cardinals to the Philadelphia Phillies.He challenged the bosses, and they destroyed him with the help of other players (employees) and the sports press now saying how heroic he was.''I am a man, not a consignment of goods to be bought and sold,'' he said in 1970, suing for the right to change employers.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1997
Former major-league outfielder Curt Flood, who put his career on the line to challenge baseball's reserve clause, died yesterday of throat cancer at the age of 59.Flood, a three-time All-Star and a seven-time Gold Glove winner, was one of the best center fielders in the game when he sued baseball in 1970 in a vain attempt to overturn a long-standing provision in the Major League Agreement that bound each player to his team for the length of his career....
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2006
A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight For Free Agency in Professional Sports Brad Snyder Viking / 472 pages / $25.95. In 1969, after 12 years as an outstanding outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, Curt Flood learned from a sportswriter that he had been traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. The next day a form preprinted on an index card made it official. "If I had been a foot-shuffling porter," Flood fumed, "they might have at least given me a pocket watch." With roots in St. Louis, including a portrait and photography business, Flood opted to forgo his $90,000 salary and retire.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2007
A year ago, one of baseball's most prolific home run hitters decided he'd rather quit playing than lower himself to accepting a minor league contract. Later this month, Sammy Sosa will report to spring training with the Texas Rangers because he would rather accept a minor league contract than quit playing. Sosa, 38, reportedly will earn $500,000 if he makes the Opening Day roster, plus an additional $2 million if he meets all his incentives. He's 12 home runs shy of 600 for his career, which seemed as out of reach during his one season with the Orioles in 2005 as the balls he once launched into upper decks throughout the majors.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
Curt Flood received 71 votes in his last year of Hall of Fame eligibility. The man who started baseball's economic revolution was named on about 15 percent of the ballots cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and so will get a footnote instead of a plaque for a courageous effort that brought him more pain than fame.Flood was the first player to mount a serious legal challenge to Major League Baseball's reserve clause, which allowed teams to hold indefinite contractual control over their players.
SPORTS
By Gordon Edes and Gordon Edes,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 25, 1995
CLEVELAND -- So far, he has tolerated the chemotherapy; the second cycle began Monday. But now Curt Flood is to undergo radiation for throat cancer tomorrow morning, and the doctors say he cannot skip the treatment.So Curt Flood hopes his friend of 50 years, Vada Pinson, will understand if he is unable to make it to Oakland for Pinson's funeral that day."Vada would say, 'You did what? Get out of here,' " Flood said yesterday from his home in Los Angeles, where he looks up from the phone and every day sees the same picture on the wall: Vada Pinson, Curt Flood and Lou Brock on a framed cover of the Sporting News.
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