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NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
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NEWS
August 11, 2014
Erica Green 's recent article concerning the progressive pedagogy on tap at the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School details deeply troubling trends in education today ( "Mount Washington school redefines education," Aug. 7). Instead of insisting on the educator's authority in the classroom, school leaders misguidedly attempt to "democratize" the learning process. Their radical reforms (student proposed curricula, hiring decisions decided on by a student vote, etc.) do anything but. The tyranny of the child majority, comprised of young children still in the process of becoming, is far more oppressive than the command of any adult presence.
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NEWS
September 22, 2010
State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's plan to add environmental education to the curriculum of public elementary, middle and high schools is a welcome move toward making all students more aware of our responsibility to care for the planet and the impact our choices have on it. Many important public policy debates — from climate change and conservation to man-made disasters such as BP's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico —...
NEWS
July 17, 2014
I think the new curriculum is not good at all ( "MSA warning signs," July 15). As a country, we focus more on test and test scores than we actually do on teaching these kids. The old ways of doing things were better and way more effective. We should adapt with the time without compromising our children's education - meaning add on instead of taking away or switching up. Also, those making these decisions should not be people who never stepped foot in a classroom as a teacher.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
I couldn't agree more emphatically with letter writer Tony DiStephano that the new Common Core curriculum is ill-timed and lacks appropriate resources ("Common Core isn't ready for prime time," Oct. 1). He correctly refers to the orderly way in which substantive curriculum change took place in Baltimore County as recently as the 1990s. Whenever a new approach was offered (usually by a major university) several experienced teachers were chosen to participate in the writing and development of that approach and to pilot it with one or more of their regular classes.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future has launched a free, online curriculum for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. Teaching the Food System is designed to be inserted into anything from social studies, to environmental science and biology classes. The center which is part of the Bloomberg School of Public Health is offering $2,000 grants to teachers who need money for materials or field trips. 
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Westowne Elementary teacher Kathleen Mannion has spent long hours after classes using a cumbersome website to access the curriculum she is supposed to teach the next day. "I almost feel like I am living in an alternative universe," said Mannion, who told of how she and fellow teachers at the Catonsville area school regularly leave school at 9 p.m. "I do feel frustrated. " One month into the new school year and rigorous new standards known as Common Core, a number of glitches have arisen within Maryland's public school districts.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
As Baltimore County prepared for a major shift in education to take effect this school year, Superintendent Dallas Dance promised that the system's 53,000 elementary students would be taught with a "world-class" curriculum. But the initial multimillion-dollar effort to develop course plans for language arts collapsed as complaints flew in both directions between school officials and a Washington-based company hired for the project, according to email and other documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun in a public records request.
NEWS
August 19, 2012
Thanks for your report about the National Science Foundation's efforts to increase knowledge of global warming in the mid-Atlantic region ("Maryland gets grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 15). Climate change is indeed a "touchy" subject to the uninformed; this initiative is necessary to combat such shortsightedness. Here's hoping that a discussion about "what our options are" to deal with the problem includes a discussion of the fee-and-dividend model to reduce emissions.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 9, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - Now that Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy has ruled that our moral, ethical, even legal framework in the matter of capital punishment for murderers under 18 is to be determined by "evolving standards," let us move on to another application of that flawed philosophy: sex. In the produce section of the grocery store, the lowly cucumber is about to achieve an elevated position in some Montgomery County public schools. Montgomery County has long been known as a "bedroom community" in the affluent Washington, D.C., suburbs - an appropriate moniker given what young students are about to be taught.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Dreambuilder was making slow progress. The 35-foot-long sailboat meandered in the waters off Annapolis on Wednesday as its teenage crew stood on deck and watched in dismay. “I don't think I've ever gone so fast,” Tommy Pipher, 16, said dryly from the helm. “I think the rudder's broken,” said Ellie Wood, 16. Pipher and Wood, rising juniors at South River High School in Edgewater, are part of a group of 13 students who have been learning the ins and outs of sailing and navigation over two weeks at the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a sailing education nonprofit in Annapolis.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
Dan Furman Age: 30 Occupation: Delegation Counsel, Howard County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly and Attorney/Owner Dan Furman, Attorney at Law, LLC. Education: J.D., Catholic University of America, B.A., Political Science, University of Maryland Baltimore County Previous elected office/community investment:   Nearly two years as Student Member of the Howard County Board of Education, Maryland State...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
After 22 years of teaching in Baltimore County, JoAnne Field says she will be leaving her third-grade classroom this year. She loves the children, has a principal she believes is "wonderful and supportive" and is committed to public education. But because of the rapid changes to the county's curriculum for elementary schools, she doesn't feel she has been as successful with her class this year as she should have been. "If I do what ... the county is now expecting me to do, I can't look at my children in the eyes.
NEWS
Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Union officials and lawmakers seized on Baltimore County's bungled rollout of a Common Core curriculum to renew calls to give teachers and school districts more time to implement the new rigorous education standards. The county school system paid $2.1 million last year to edCount LLC, the company it hired to write new language-arts course plans, even though it described the work as unsatisfactory in email exchanges obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The district severed ties with the company in June and had a team of county teachers and administrators take up the work.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
As Baltimore County prepared for a major shift in education to take effect this school year, Superintendent Dallas Dance promised that the system's 53,000 elementary students would be taught with a "world-class" curriculum. But the initial multimillion-dollar effort to develop course plans for language arts collapsed as complaints flew in both directions between school officials and a Washington-based company hired for the project, according to email and other documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun in a public records request.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
After reading your report about the moonlighting of Baltimore County's school superintendent, I am going to start a coaching school for superintendents ( "Dance quits consulting job with company doing business with school system," Dec. 14). Since the current superintendent only had principal training, I am sure he would find my curriculum both challenging and relevant. The first lesson would deal with the basic rules for a highly paid school superintendent: (1) Read you contract before you sign it. Know what it says.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Erica Green 's recent article concerning the progressive pedagogy on tap at the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School details deeply troubling trends in education today ( "Mount Washington school redefines education," Aug. 7). Instead of insisting on the educator's authority in the classroom, school leaders misguidedly attempt to "democratize" the learning process. Their radical reforms (student proposed curricula, hiring decisions decided on by a student vote, etc.) do anything but. The tyranny of the child majority, comprised of young children still in the process of becoming, is far more oppressive than the command of any adult presence.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Opponents of national standardization and centralized control of education could quibble with the analysis of Kalman R. Hettleman, a former member of the Baltimore School Board ("The brewing battle over the Common Core," July 14). However, it was refreshing to read the take of one "ardent fan of national standards and tests" who recognizes (1) the existence of a bipartisan, conservative-liberal coalition opposing the Common Core juggernaut, and (2) the reasonableness of at least slowing down the train to let classrooms adjust before authorities start holding students and teachers accountable for scores from the online testing.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Baltimore County teachers at a town hall meeting Thursday night told Superintendent Dallas Dance they are desperately trying to keep up with the fast pace of state-mandated educational changes that have brought them more work and much frustration. Teachers, some in tears and some angry, said the first year of the county's introduction of its new curriculum tied to the Common Core had significant problems that have yet to be addressed. More than 100 teachers attended the forum, the first Dance has held with teachers.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
At The Atlantic , Olga Khazan has followed up on an article disputing that journalists should be taught computer code , with one suggesting what they should  be taught.  I can heartily endorse some of her suggestions. Statistics? Sure. If you could see how often professional journalists go awry on something as simple as computing percentages, you would want them to be more numerate. Take special note of opinion polling so that reporters don't fall for every shoddy, slanted survey that comes down the pike.
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