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By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2002
Days after eager children leave their classrooms for summer vacation, their desks are filled with teachers and administrators debating what the students should be taught when they return. Which books to read. Which science to learn. How history should be studied. It is a hot-weather ritual at school districts throughout the state and country, especially the larger ones in the Baltimore area that have staffs dedicated to curriculum development. In this age of high-stakes testing, it is important work, affecting not only whether the students can progress to the next grade but whether their schools will be taken over by the state.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
For many students who took the Maryland School Assessments this year, parts of the math sections just didn't add up. Amid the rollout of new curriculums aligned with the more rigorous Common Core standards, pass rates on the Maryland School Assessments plunged, with this year marking the steepest drops in the test's history because of a dive in math scores. There was a good chance students in grades three through eight might not have recognized at least three concepts in which they were being asked to demonstrate mastery.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
For two months every year, Ryan Schaaf the third-grade teacher trades in his marking pens and planning books for tools and repair manuals to become Mr. Fix It for the Columbia Association's aquatics department. He is one of thousands of Maryland teachers taking on summer jobs to supplement their incomes by writing curricula, mowing lawns, painting houses, waiting tables or - in Schaaf's case - battling with pool filters. "Getting a second job is almost a necessity," said Sheila M. Finlayson, president of the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
The group of about 125 elementary school children gathered at Harford Glen Environmental Education Center for a firsthand look at how the earth is formed. They spent the school day outdoors testing the water, measuring contour lines and learning about land forms. "Throughout the day, the children had a chance to see that science is not just in the classroom," said Pamela Lottero-Perdue, an assistant professor of science education at Towson University. "There is a big push for 'No Child Left Inside.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The first day of school will be a day of anxiety, stress and confusion not only for hundreds of new pupils, but also for Carroll County's 140 new teachers.To ease the transition from college to classroom, Carroll County public schools are holding the 10th annual new-teacher training program this week.Teachers will kick off the program this morning at North Carroll High School. The mandatory sessions give new teachers a chance to learn about curricula, school policies and procedures, fringe benefits and contract issues.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
`Afrocentric' lessons help all children learn Gregory Kane missed the mark in his recent column "An Afrocentric curriculum won't makes students better" (Oct. 13). Although an Afrocentric curriculum itself would not "fix the problems" in our public schools, it would at least provide all students, and black students in particular, a much-needed appreciation for the faith, sacrifice and endurance exhibited by people of African ancestry from the beginning of recorded history to the present.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
For many students who took the Maryland School Assessments this year, parts of the math sections just didn't add up. Amid the rollout of new curriculums aligned with the more rigorous Common Core standards, pass rates on the Maryland School Assessments plunged, with this year marking the steepest drops in the test's history because of a dive in math scores. There was a good chance students in grades three through eight might not have recognized at least three concepts in which they were being asked to demonstrate mastery.
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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
Time was when a student didn't graduate from college without studying Plato's "Republic," Shakespeare's "Hamlet," Milton's "Paradise Lost." The texts were read lovingly with sharp attention to detail, to beauty, to allusion.That time is long past.Now, argues Yale University professor Harold Bloom, few students receive a bachelor's degree without reading the novels of Alice Walker. Shakespeare, if studied at all, is examined for evidence of class warfare; Plato is reviled as fascist and "Paradise Lost" as sexist.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki and Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
EL DORADO, Ark. - President Bush proposed new requirements yesterday for vocational training curricula and for science and math education that he said would help Americans acquire needed skills for jobs in the fast-changing economy. "We want every citizen in this country to be able to get the skills necessary to fill the jobs of the 21st century. There are new jobs being created," the president said at the South Arkansas Community College. Bush's appearance was part of a recent drive to highlight his efforts on job-creation - an issue that looms large in his reelection bid. During an hour-long event that the White House billed as a "conversation" on job training and the economy, Bush pronounced the economy to be in solid recovery, citing in part Friday's Labor Department report that 308,000 jobs were created last month.
NEWS
September 29, 2001
LONG THE SUBJECT of inexcusable neglect, middle schools are finally getting proper attention from area school systems. Baltimore's schools chief Carmen Russo, delighted that the system's elementary students are making gains, will place added focus on disappointing middle school programs. Baltimore County school officials have added resource teachers and replaced the principal and some staffers at Woodlawn Middle School. That school's students have performed so abysmally that the state is threatening a takeover.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
A three-year plan for improving math curricula and teaching in Carroll County schools would ease students' transitions from elementary through high school, encourage the use of test data in instructional decision-making and place a math-resource teacher at every school. The draft plan, expected to cost more than $2 million to implement, is the second of three designed for different skill areas. The school system recently launched a two-year, comprehensive reading improvement plan that calls for more frequent assessments of students, among other reforms.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,Special to The Sun | April 4, 2007
School officials couldn't quite fill all the seats when Meade High School launched a specialized pre-engineering curriculum four years ago. Now, overwhelmed by student demand, they plan to add a biomedical program to accompany the engineering courses. That will be in addition to scores of students - 50 percent to 60 percent of them minorities - expecting to take International Baccalaureate classes at Meade in 2008. "We've got academic momentum," Acting Principal Daryl Kennedy said. "And there's no stopping us."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Planning for Anne Arundel County's first two charter schools could begin in earnest if school board members approve two applications at a meeting today. Representatives of the two proposed schools say they feel secure about the process and their applications. "I'm pretty confident that things are going to go well on Wednesday," said B. Jallon Brown, who would be principal of one of the schools, KIPP Harbor Academy. KIPP, which stands for Knowledge Is Power Program, would offer a college-preparatory education in the Annapolis area to middle school pupils starting in July.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki and Edwin Chen and Erika Hayasaki,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
EL DORADO, Ark. - President Bush proposed new requirements yesterday for vocational training curricula and for science and math education that he said would help Americans acquire needed skills for jobs in the fast-changing economy. "We want every citizen in this country to be able to get the skills necessary to fill the jobs of the 21st century. There are new jobs being created," the president said at the South Arkansas Community College. Bush's appearance was part of a recent drive to highlight his efforts on job-creation - an issue that looms large in his reelection bid. During an hour-long event that the White House billed as a "conversation" on job training and the economy, Bush pronounced the economy to be in solid recovery, citing in part Friday's Labor Department report that 308,000 jobs were created last month.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
NO LONGER is a high school diploma a ticket to college. That's because the nation's high schools and colleges don't work well together. What should be a seamless pipeline from kindergarten through college leaks like a sieve, particularly at the high school level. The problems are many: Steadily increasing tuition rates are shutting out more students, even from previously inexpensive community colleges, some of which are limiting enrollment in popular programs. Many states, including Maryland, are requiring students to pass tests to graduate from high school, but those tests, and the curriculum on which they're based, aren't aligned with the expectations of colleges and employers.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
For two months every year, Ryan Schaaf the third-grade teacher trades in his marking pens and planning books for tools and repair manuals to become Mr. Fix It for the Columbia Association's aquatics department. He is one of thousands of Maryland teachers taking on summer jobs to supplement their incomes by writing curricula, mowing lawns, painting houses, waiting tables or - in Schaaf's case - battling with pool filters. "Getting a second job is almost a necessity," said Sheila M. Finlayson, president of the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff | June 5, 1998
Maryland's business leaders were warned yesterday that middle school students -- even the high achievers -- are being dragged down by chaotic and shallow curricula in math and science."
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,Special to The Sun | April 4, 2007
School officials couldn't quite fill all the seats when Meade High School launched a specialized pre-engineering curriculum four years ago. Now, overwhelmed by student demand, they plan to add a biomedical program to accompany the engineering courses. That will be in addition to scores of students - 50 percent to 60 percent of them minorities - expecting to take International Baccalaureate classes at Meade in 2008. "We've got academic momentum," Acting Principal Daryl Kennedy said. "And there's no stopping us."
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
Calling Baltimore County's middle schools a "weak link," Superintendent Joe A. Hairston is proposing an overhaul that would toughen instruction for sixth- to eighth-graders and focus their learning on core subjects such as language arts and math. The goal is to improve academic achievement, which test scores indicate drops after pupils leave elementary school. "Middle schools must challenge students to meet higher academic standards, and the curriculum should emphasize a deeper understanding of concepts," said Hairston, who presented the plan to the school board last week.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
Howard County is known for its fine public school system. But for those parents who feel private school is the best option, many choices are available within the county lines. Although the words private school often conjure the image of the rich and elite, the families of those who attend say that is a stereotype. The dozens of nonpublic schools, as they are called by the State Department of Education, are as varied as the students who attend. The county is home to schools steeped in tradition, newer schools with fresh ideas, schools affiliated with religious organizations and schools for children with learning differences.
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