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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Commentator Adil E. Shamoo overlooks two crucial points necessary to understanding the current Israel-Hamas conflict ( "Israel's unjust war," Aug. 1). First, Hamas under its charter and by the statements of its leaders is committed to Israel's destruction. Given those circumstances, Israel has the right under Article 51 of the United Nations Charter to defend itself. Second, while Mr. Shamoo correctly bemoans the civilians killed in the current war between Israel and Hamas, there is a moral issue he overlooks: Who bears the greater moral responsibility - Hamas, which places its rockets and fighters in heavily populated Palestinian areas, or Israel, which responds to the rockets fired from those heavily populated areas?
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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Commentator Adil E. Shamoo overlooks two crucial points necessary to understanding the current Israel-Hamas conflict ( "Israel's unjust war," Aug. 1). First, Hamas under its charter and by the statements of its leaders is committed to Israel's destruction. Given those circumstances, Israel has the right under Article 51 of the United Nations Charter to defend itself. Second, while Mr. Shamoo correctly bemoans the civilians killed in the current war between Israel and Hamas, there is a moral issue he overlooks: Who bears the greater moral responsibility - Hamas, which places its rockets and fighters in heavily populated Palestinian areas, or Israel, which responds to the rockets fired from those heavily populated areas?
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NEWS
July 6, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH had the nerve to invoke Valley Forge on Monday during a speech about the war in Iraq. Americans persevered through "terrible hardships and losses" back then, he said, and presumably Iraq will be no different. Question No. 1: In what ways are the American Revolution and the war in Iraq similar? Answer: In no ways. Question No. 2: In what ways are George Washington and George W. Bush similar? Answer: See above. If the commander in chief needs reminding, the encampment at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-1778 was the darkest hour of the struggle for independence.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2008
All over Maryland and around the country, politicians, veterans and the civic-minded of all stripes paid tribute to military service members who died fighting in wars around the world, some long ago concluded and others that have yet to end. "Today we ask Americans not to have sad thoughts at the passing of our heroes, but rather to have thoughts of their legacy of life that was made possible by their commitment, their loyalty and their patriotism," said...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Garret Condon and Garret Condon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2003
Coalition forces are pounding Iraqi targets as war protesters fill the streets of cities across the world - including many in the United States. The stock market is flat. The homeland is insecure. Who knows what the future holds? Actually, no one. But there are hardheaded oracles - called futurists - who get paid to look beyond the horizon. Nationally known prognosticators don't necessarily agree on what's ahead, but several say America and the world are at a major turning point. "The revolution has begun," said Gerald Celente, director and founder of the Trends Research Institute in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and author of Trends 2000.
NEWS
By CHRIS DAVIS | December 23, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration should convene a bipartisan panel of judges and law professors to study the issue of detained terrorist suspects and how to treat them and to recommend a policy. The lack of a policy toward detainees is damaging our efforts in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of our allies may view our lack of a coherent detainee policy as a tacit endorsement of torture. Nor will people in the Middle East accept democracy if the strongest democracy in the world seems to advocate immoral and inhuman treatment of prisoners.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991 Washington Post Writers Group | January 23, 1991
NEW YORK -- One of the hoariest myths in America is that wars, awful as they are, at least rev up the economy and create jobs. I'll argue with that idea in a moment. But before I do, let me note that war with Iraq hasn't even lived up to its myth. From the moment it hovered into view, it has been destroying jobs.Iraq's invasion of Kuwait drove up oil prices, which swiftly increased the price of gasoline and heating oil. That left consumers with less money to spend on other goods. Fear of war, in addition to the pocketbook pinch, helped set off a crash in consumer confidence in the fourth quarter of 1990.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke in early 2004, thanks to leaked photos taken by some of our soldiers, I suggested then that cameras should be issued to all of our soldiers. Then we wouldn't have to wait for the Pentagon or the White House to let us folks back home know what we should be outraged about. I wrote as a Vietnam-era veteran who was appreciating - more than Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was - the ability of today's digital technology to empower ordinary GIs to get their side of war stories out, warts and all. Little did I know that filmmaker Deborah Scranton was in the process of providing video cameras to three National Guardsmen from New England so they could do what I was suggesting: record video journals of their unit's yearlong deployment in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
NEWS
By KENNETH LAVON JOHNSON | May 28, 2006
As a veteran of the Vietnam War, I hold a special place in my heart for Memorial Day. Certainly, we all honor those who have given their lives in American wars in pursuit of freedom for mankind at home and abroad, for they well deserve to be remembered for making the ultimate sacrifice. But this Memorial Day, we who served in the Vietnam War are still being told that our service was in vain, because that war was unjust - and we have to wonder: Will the same be said of those who are fighting, and dying, in the current war in Iraq?
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 1, 2004
THE MAN ON the television news offers the latest body count from Iraq and then switches to Washington for the opening of the new World War II memorial. Buzz Williams probably isn't watching. His war was fought in the Persian Gulf under George Bush I. At moments such as this, Williams is learning one of the uncomfortable points of American history: You can't tell the wars without a scorecard. Williams has written a heart-thumping book about his war. It is called Spare Parts: A Marine Reservist's Journey from Campus to Combat in 38 Days.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke in early 2004, thanks to leaked photos taken by some of our soldiers, I suggested then that cameras should be issued to all of our soldiers. Then we wouldn't have to wait for the Pentagon or the White House to let us folks back home know what we should be outraged about. I wrote as a Vietnam-era veteran who was appreciating - more than Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld was - the ability of today's digital technology to empower ordinary GIs to get their side of war stories out, warts and all. Little did I know that filmmaker Deborah Scranton was in the process of providing video cameras to three National Guardsmen from New England so they could do what I was suggesting: record video journals of their unit's yearlong deployment in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
NEWS
By KENNETH LAVON JOHNSON | May 28, 2006
As a veteran of the Vietnam War, I hold a special place in my heart for Memorial Day. Certainly, we all honor those who have given their lives in American wars in pursuit of freedom for mankind at home and abroad, for they well deserve to be remembered for making the ultimate sacrifice. But this Memorial Day, we who served in the Vietnam War are still being told that our service was in vain, because that war was unjust - and we have to wonder: Will the same be said of those who are fighting, and dying, in the current war in Iraq?
NEWS
By CHRIS DAVIS | December 23, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration should convene a bipartisan panel of judges and law professors to study the issue of detained terrorist suspects and how to treat them and to recommend a policy. The lack of a policy toward detainees is damaging our efforts in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of our allies may view our lack of a coherent detainee policy as a tacit endorsement of torture. Nor will people in the Middle East accept democracy if the strongest democracy in the world seems to advocate immoral and inhuman treatment of prisoners.
NEWS
July 6, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH had the nerve to invoke Valley Forge on Monday during a speech about the war in Iraq. Americans persevered through "terrible hardships and losses" back then, he said, and presumably Iraq will be no different. Question No. 1: In what ways are the American Revolution and the war in Iraq similar? Answer: In no ways. Question No. 2: In what ways are George Washington and George W. Bush similar? Answer: See above. If the commander in chief needs reminding, the encampment at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-1778 was the darkest hour of the struggle for independence.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 1, 2004
THE MAN ON the television news offers the latest body count from Iraq and then switches to Washington for the opening of the new World War II memorial. Buzz Williams probably isn't watching. His war was fought in the Persian Gulf under George Bush I. At moments such as this, Williams is learning one of the uncomfortable points of American history: You can't tell the wars without a scorecard. Williams has written a heart-thumping book about his war. It is called Spare Parts: A Marine Reservist's Journey from Campus to Combat in 38 Days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Garret Condon and Garret Condon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2003
Coalition forces are pounding Iraqi targets as war protesters fill the streets of cities across the world - including many in the United States. The stock market is flat. The homeland is insecure. Who knows what the future holds? Actually, no one. But there are hardheaded oracles - called futurists - who get paid to look beyond the horizon. Nationally known prognosticators don't necessarily agree on what's ahead, but several say America and the world are at a major turning point. "The revolution has begun," said Gerald Celente, director and founder of the Trends Research Institute in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and author of Trends 2000.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 13, 1991
For nine months in 1943, Pauline Nell didn't know whether her new husband was alive or dead.Nell, now 76 and living in Mount Airy, was then a nurse working in Oklahoma City. Her husband, Richard, was listed as missing in action by the Air Force."Everything just drains out of you," she said. "I just kept up hope he would come back. There's nothing else you can do."Nine months later she received a letter from her husband. Richard was in Central America on a secret mission. He was OK and had been doing Air Force undercover work he wasn't allowed to tell her about.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 2001
MADISON, Wis. - The bricks are still charred in one corner of the Red Gym at the University of Wisconsin here, burned by a bomb hurled by anti-war protesters trying to destroy the offices of the ROTC, or Reserve Officers' Training Corps. But that was another time and another war. Today, even on this legendarily radical campus, uniformed ROTC members drill at will and train to become military officers without fear of disdain or worse from what one student newspaper calls "the peace-mongers."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
As rites of passage often do, the Johns Hopkins University's undergraduate commencement yesterday blended the sober with the festive. For fun, it was hard to top the sight of retired Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr., who received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree, bedecked in the university's gold and sable academic colors - instead of in Oriole black and orange - and wearing a tasseled black cap. All that was missing was an "8" on the back of...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 2001
MADISON, Wis. - The bricks are still charred in one corner of the Red Gym at the University of Wisconsin here, burned by a bomb hurled by anti-war protesters trying to destroy the offices of the ROTC, or Reserve Officers' Training Corps. But that was another time and another war. Today, even on this legendarily radical campus, uniformed ROTC members drill at will and train to become military officers without fear of disdain or worse from what one student newspaper calls "the peace-mongers."
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