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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Local cartoonist Michael Cotter asked the assembled youngsters at the Annapolis area library to name a big story in the news, and 13-year-old Rhaei Brown, who was sporting a Ravens jersey, couldn't utter his answer fast enough. "The lockout!" the Annapolis resident exclaimed, referring to the NFL work stoppage that recently ended. Then Rhaei created a cartoon about the lockout in which he depicted an NFL executive and a football player tugging at opposite sides of an oversized dollar bill.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
How much do you know about the week's new events? Or the geography of the Middle East? Or Batman movies? Coleman Anderson and his partner, Andrew Schuster, are betting a few hundred thousand of their investors' dollars that whatever you know, you'll want to test yourself, and that you're willing to spend time in the pursuit on their new website: Newsup. "The goal really is to make news a more meaningful experience for folks," especially young people, said Anderson, the chief marketing officer, who is 29. The site — http://www.newsup.me — presents news about national and world events, entertainment and sports in the form of an array of brief quizzes on a particular topic.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1994
If you're interested in history and current events, tonight's TV offers a don't-miss trifecta, and you can watch all three sequentially by flipping channels. Start with NBC's superb, inventive and highly original "World War II: When Lions Roared" miniseries, which dramatizes the speeches, conversations and strategies of three world leaders: Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. When that's over, switch to MTV, where Bill Clinton holds forth on violence. When that's over, switch to ABC, where Ted Koppel is host of a "Viewpoint" on Whitewater and the media.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 20, 2014
As Oliver Hardy used to tell Stan Laurel is those old black-and-white movie comedies, "Well, here's another nice mess you've gotten me into!" That continues to be Barack Obama's refrain to his predecessor, George W. Bush, as he struggles in his sixth year in the Oval Office to bring about the change in Washington he promised in 2008. Mr. Obama's latest quandary is how to cope with Iraq's Islamist insurgency and revived sectarian conflict in the war he essentially declared over in 2011 by withdrawing the last American fighting troops.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | December 9, 2007
Recent news stories have convinced me it's time for another Janet's World Current Events Poetry Column, where I attempt to make sense of what's being reported on the local and national scene through meticulously crafted verse with snappy end-rhymes. But first, let me say that I understand your discomfort when you hear the word "poetry." Like me, you probably think, "But I spent a week reading T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock in high school, and I still don't know what in the blazes it means."
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1996
I AM MARRIED to a man who considers it a privilege to pay taxes, and reminds me that our nation's tax rate is among the lowest in the world. I try hard to remember that about this time every year. It doesn't do me much good, but I offer his attitude in the hopes that it will give some comfort today, to someone.Sleepover with 'Chelsea'One thing that does give comfort is the indomitable energy and enthusiasm of youth. Take, for example, the bevy of students, ages 5 to 18, who are preparing an original musical for presentation at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing Writer | October 30, 1994
It's a klatch -- minus the coffee -- of about 15 senior citizens that meets every Monday morning at the Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia.Calling themselves the SPRING Currents, members discuss national and international current events. The group is one of 12 operating at the senior center under a program known as SPRING, short for Senior Peer Resources: Individuals, Networksand Groups.On a recent Monday morning, seven women and six men sat around a conference table and chatted amicably as they waited for their leader, Charles "Bud" Hochberg, to start the meeting by presenting the first news topic of the day."
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
I've been thinking about all the wasted green space. ... It should be used for open vegetable gardens," announced Bob Spongberg, after shuffling through his index cards of discussion ideas. "This is my current shtick." Spongberg, 82, fell silent for a moment and glanced around the room at the 17 other senior citizens who had assembled at Florence Bain Senior Center in Harper's Choice on a recent Monday morning. With name cards displayed and chairs pulled up to four tables set at right angles, the setting for the Current Events Group appears more formal than it actually is. The structure of these meetings - which have been held weekly for more than 15 years - calls for no strict rules of order, except there is a facilitator and no one shows disrespect for another person's opinion.
NEWS
By Don Spatz | January 5, 1996
Nothing can make youfeel older,With the years stacked aroundyou like monumentsThan to learn that your child'shistory lessonsAre what you once thought ofas current events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | October 18, 2007
What's the point? -- This site is definitely not just for moms, despite the name. It features a rotating cast of snarky columnists weighing in on everything from current events to parenting trends and products. What to look for --Check out Advice Smackdown by Amalah for to-the-point, well-researched and often-hilarious suggestions on hair products, fashion, skin care, makeup and more.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
The Baltimore Sun's op-ed page is valuable real estate. One would hope it would provide a home for people with interesting, creative, perhaps unorthodox perspectives on current events. This is what I have not seen from Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. whose views track closely with the current right-wing talking points. Mr. Ehrlich's most recent column ("Musings on intolerant lefties and wars on women," May 18) is a prime example. It includes an attack on "college lefties," then on Sandra Fluke's "desire to enjoy taxpayer-financed sex" (Obamacare attack, part 1)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Roberta L. Nevitt, a retired social worker who had worked for the Baltimore County Department of Aging, died July 27 of cancer at the Hospice of the Piedmont in Charlottesville, Va. She was 64. Roberta Lee Nevitt was born in Atlanta and later moved with her family to Baltimore, where she grew up in Govans. She was a 1965 graduate of Eastern High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1968 from Kalamazoo College in Michigan and a master's in social work from the University of Maryland in 1973.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Local cartoonist Michael Cotter asked the assembled youngsters at the Annapolis area library to name a big story in the news, and 13-year-old Rhaei Brown, who was sporting a Ravens jersey, couldn't utter his answer fast enough. "The lockout!" the Annapolis resident exclaimed, referring to the NFL work stoppage that recently ended. Then Rhaei created a cartoon about the lockout in which he depicted an NFL executive and a football player tugging at opposite sides of an oversized dollar bill.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
I've been thinking about all the wasted green space. ... It should be used for open vegetable gardens," announced Bob Spongberg, after shuffling through his index cards of discussion ideas. "This is my current shtick." Spongberg, 82, fell silent for a moment and glanced around the room at the 17 other senior citizens who had assembled at Florence Bain Senior Center in Harper's Choice on a recent Monday morning. With name cards displayed and chairs pulled up to four tables set at right angles, the setting for the Current Events Group appears more formal than it actually is. The structure of these meetings - which have been held weekly for more than 15 years - calls for no strict rules of order, except there is a facilitator and no one shows disrespect for another person's opinion.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | December 9, 2007
Recent news stories have convinced me it's time for another Janet's World Current Events Poetry Column, where I attempt to make sense of what's being reported on the local and national scene through meticulously crafted verse with snappy end-rhymes. But first, let me say that I understand your discomfort when you hear the word "poetry." Like me, you probably think, "But I spent a week reading T.S. Eliot's The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock in high school, and I still don't know what in the blazes it means."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 4, 2007
In a day and age when documentary filmmaking is defined for many by Michael Moore's sharply edited images and his wise-guy narrator persona, K. Ryan Jones goes looking for truth the old-fashioned way in Fall From Grace, premiering tonight on Showtime. Like CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow in his famous 1954 See It Now expose of hate-mongering Sen. Joseph McCarthy, Jones comes face to face with his subject and doesn't back down. Eye-to-eye, Jones and his camera never blink as Fred Phelps, pastor of Kansas' cultlike Westboro Baptist Church, spews bizarre interpretations of current events -- seeing the war in Iraq and Sept.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | October 25, 1998
KEITH SMITH'S efforts to have Montel Williams, Rosie O'Donnell and Oprah Winfrey write letters on behalf of Anne Arundel County's gifted and talented program is pretty easy to dismiss.Why would County Executive John G. Gary or the school board pay any more attention to these afternoon television personalities than they would to parents who live and vote in the county?Mr. Smith, a former teacher of gifted and talented students, obviously is willing to try anything to revive this program, which was eliminated during this year's education budget slashing.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
The Baltimore Sun's op-ed page is valuable real estate. One would hope it would provide a home for people with interesting, creative, perhaps unorthodox perspectives on current events. This is what I have not seen from Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. whose views track closely with the current right-wing talking points. Mr. Ehrlich's most recent column ("Musings on intolerant lefties and wars on women," May 18) is a prime example. It includes an attack on "college lefties," then on Sandra Fluke's "desire to enjoy taxpayer-financed sex" (Obamacare attack, part 1)
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 18, 2007
Every once in a while, I'll stumble upon someone offering a critique of a certain sports broadcasting personality and see him bring out what obviously looms in his mind as a big club. "This guy never played pro ball, so what does he know?" To quote Charlie Brown, arrgghhh. The fact is, he might know a lot. Here's one way to look at it: On ESPN's NFL studio shows, who most often tells you things you didn't know? Chris Mortensen. On Fox NFL Sunday, who is most likely to supply you with new information?
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | October 18, 2007
What's the point? -- This site is definitely not just for moms, despite the name. It features a rotating cast of snarky columnists weighing in on everything from current events to parenting trends and products. What to look for --Check out Advice Smackdown by Amalah for to-the-point, well-researched and often-hilarious suggestions on hair products, fashion, skin care, makeup and more.
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