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NEWS
August 6, 2012
They called it the "seven minutes or terror" for the complex maneuverings and rocket blasts conducted in the final moments of a 354 million mile journey from home, but the Curiosity rover executed its landing flawlessly. Those who doubted U.S. preeminence in space exploration — or even in science and engineering in an era of outsourcing and global competition — should pay heed. Too bad there was no film crew on the surface of Mars (at least as far as we distant earthlings can tell)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Nabisco was all ready with a special  Oreo cookie celebrating the successful landing of the Mars rover, Curiosity. That's some cool stuff. The Oreo Daily Twist is part of Nabisco's ongoing celebation of the Oreo centennial. The special Oreo is not available on Earth, though. It's just something cool to look at.
BUSINESS
Patrick Maynard and Dana Amihere and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Check back on this slug frequently for updated details about the Xbox release. Microsoft today showcased details of its next-generation gaming platform, Xbox One, which will succeed the Xbox 360. The announcement at Microsoft's Redmond campus followed significant speculation about the new device, which is expected to include a built-in version of the formerly detached Kinect module. Don Mattrick, president of the interactive entertainment business, debuted the box at 1 p.m. EST Tuesday, with the Microsoft team showing off a "hub"-style device that relies heavily on voice commands and gestures for control.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,TPG Communications | August 10, 1992
"What a distressing contrast there is between the radiant curiosity of the child and the feeble mentality of the average adult," Freud once wrote. Sad to say, he's got a point.In advanced societies, knowledge is the basis for almost all value. Corporations that wish to become "knowledge-intensive" must invest heavily in training and electronic networks. But to become knowledge-intensive as a matter of course calls for something that goes far beyond bits, bytes and hours in the classroom. Perhaps the management issue for the '90s, largely avoided by gurus and practitioners alike, is unleashing imagination.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | May 3, 2003
BALTIMORE IS a great place to live, but you'd better have been born into the sixth generation of a local family to know its secrets. This town will not unfold itself to just anybody. I'm not sure that what I'm about to recommend will satisfy all your curiosity about old Baltimore, but it will be a fine way to spend three successive Sunday afternoons in May. I speak of a trio of interesting house tours, one tomorrow at St. Paul and 22nd streets (the Old Goucher neighborhood), another in Fells Point on May 11 and the other, just over the Baltimore County line, in Bare Hills, adjacent to Lake Roland, on May 18. I have long been a sucker for house tours.
NEWS
November 28, 2011
Is there life elsewhere in the universe? It's a question that has long intrigued astronomers and science fiction buffs alike, and now the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has launched its most ambitious attempt yet to find the answer. Curiosity, NASA's 1-ton wheeled rover vehicle, blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center on Saturday for the 346 million-mile journey to Mars, where it will spend two years roaming the Red Planet's surface in search of tell-tale organic compounds that could signal the presence of life there, either now or in the distant past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | October 15, 2000
One hot, sweaty August day a few years back, my friend Tom and I decided to take in a freak show at the Wisconsin State Fair. It wasn't something we'd normally do. Tom was the kind of guy who wore bow ties, and I've never exactly been Ms. Let-It-All-Hang-Loose. For some reason, the meshing of our personalities resulted in weirdly spontaneous behavior. The sideshow was made up of several mobile homes, each containing a different attraction. We paid admission to one, and went inside. It wasn't air-conditioned, so the lights were turned off to minimize the heat.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
His last name was common in South Carolina - maybe not as plentiful as "Smith" or "Jones," but it certainly wasn't unique. Then in John R. Gourdin's travels with the Marines, he began to realize he was meeting fewer and fewer people of the same name. For the next 15 years, he scoured phone books in search of other Gourdins, making contact in person or over the phone to trace their history. "Without exception, all of the Gourdins I've met, that I've run into, I've been able to trace them back to South Carolina," he said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | April 11, 1994
FREDERICK -- Some came for money. Some came looking for a new place to worship. Others ventured to Frederick Christian nTC Fellowship out of curiosity -- wondering what kind of church doles out $10 to visitors.Hoping to attract new members, the nondenominational church yesterday offered a $10 bill to the first 200 adult visitors. About 125 people more than usual -- adults and children -- showed up for Sunday services, and 32 adults took the $10 offer. But many put the money into the collection plate during the service.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration reported this week that ancient rocks on Mars analyzed by its Curiosity rover, which landed on the Red Planet in August, show that what is today a barren and inhospitable environment might well have supported living organisms quite comfortably in the distant past. Several billion years ago, scientists say, Mars had a thicker atmosphere and warmer weather and was awash in water flowing across its surface that was safe enough to drink. Humans, of course, did not yet exist in that primeval past, which long predated even the appearance of the first dinosaurs on Earth some 230 million years ago. But microbial life could easily have flourished during that era. Though Curiosity's lab isn't equipped to detect Martian life, past or present, it can determine whether the kind of organic molecules that are essential to life - at least as we know it - are present in the Martian environment.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
They called it the "seven minutes or terror" for the complex maneuverings and rocket blasts conducted in the final moments of a 354 million mile journey from home, but the Curiosity rover executed its landing flawlessly. Those who doubted U.S. preeminence in space exploration — or even in science and engineering in an era of outsourcing and global competition — should pay heed. Too bad there was no film crew on the surface of Mars (at least as far as we distant earthlings can tell)
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 6, 2012
Visitors to the Maryland Science Center's "SpaceLink" exhibit had an extra source to answer questions about Mars rover Curiosity on Monday -- a scientist who helped develop one of its instruments. Jennifer Stern, a space research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, was on hand with a model of Curiosity and a life-size version of one of its wheels. Stern is part of a team that has worked on the  Sample Analysis at Mars, or SAM, a set of three instruments that will be used to analyze rock and soil samples from the Martian surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Nabisco was all ready with a special  Oreo cookie celebrating the successful landing of the Mars rover, Curiosity. That's some cool stuff. The Oreo Daily Twist is part of Nabisco's ongoing celebation of the Oreo centennial. The special Oreo is not available on Earth, though. It's just something cool to look at.
NEWS
November 28, 2011
Is there life elsewhere in the universe? It's a question that has long intrigued astronomers and science fiction buffs alike, and now the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has launched its most ambitious attempt yet to find the answer. Curiosity, NASA's 1-ton wheeled rover vehicle, blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center on Saturday for the 346 million-mile journey to Mars, where it will spend two years roaming the Red Planet's surface in search of tell-tale organic compounds that could signal the presence of life there, either now or in the distant past.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Florence Tan says she'll have fingers and toes crossed when NASA's latest Mars mission blasts off as early as Saturday morning from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The 47-year-old electrical engineer from Montgomery County oversaw all the wiring of an instrument package on board that was designed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center here. In the years leading up to the launch, Tan has painstakingly checked and rechecked all 2,000 pieces of wire inside the microwave oven-sized box — enough to stretch more than a third of a mile if strung together.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | November 23, 1990
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Michael Brown Jr. sits in a small swing, his hands clenched and legs rigid as he stares into the distance. He cries for no reason and ignores the world around him.Curiosity -- and crack -- robbed the 15-month-old toddler of a normal life.Almost five weeks ago, Michael ate pieces of crack cocaine that police say were left on a table in his mother's Pompano Beach apartment. The boy suffered violent seizures, which caused severe brain damage, and he lapsed into a coma.
FEATURES
February 10, 1999
There are plenty of ``Do's'' when it comes to reading aloud to your child. Here are some ``Don'ts.''* Don't start a reading if you won't have enough time to do it justice. Having to stop after one or two pages only serves to frustrate, rather than stimulate, the child'sinterest in reading.* Don't be unnerved by questions during the reading, particularly from very young children. Answer their questions patiently. Don't put them off. Don't rush your answers. There is no time limit for reading a book but there is a time limit on a child's inquisitiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 5, 2011
Terry Shepard, a reader from Otterbein, wrote me to share these thoughts: "As we review the lessons of the career of William Donald Schaefer, Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller may wish to particularly note one: Don't hang on too long. "As studies have shown, as we age, the frontal lobes of the brain atrophy. And since these help inhibit, among other things, some inner thoughts from becoming speech, their atrophy allows hidden bigotry to be revealed. (See the October, 2007, journal Current Directions in Psychological Science or the Newsweek article on it by Googling ' Why Grandpa Says Inappropriate Things ')
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
With a balloon, a straw, a clothespin, tape and string, a group of young scientists designed a rocket that could fly across a room on a trajectory between two chairs. During their aerodynamics experiment, the children discovered that as the balloon releases air, it will travel along the string from one point to another. Then, they tested the theory with multiple balloons and organized races in their lab at the Aberdeen Boys and Girls Club in Harford County. "I learned how to make a rocket out of a balloon today," said Jeremy Valerio, 12. "With just a little material, you can make something big. " During a 10-week, after-school program, a dozen children are pursuing informal science lessons, meeting with area scientists and engineers, and testing their own math and science skills.
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