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Curfew Law

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NEWS
May 19, 2014
Next month, the Baltimore City Council is set to approve a new curfew which will call for youth under 14 to be off the street by 9 p.m. and 14- to 17-year-olds to be indoors by 11 p.m. ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youths ," May 12). The reality is that there are 5- and 6-year-olds wandering the streets of Baltimore. Some parents have their young adolescent children making errands to corner stores at 2 a.m., which isn't safe. What is a young person under the age of 14 doing outside after 9 p.m. without a parent or guardian?
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
Next month, the Baltimore City Council is set to approve a new curfew which will call for youth under 14 to be off the street by 9 p.m. and 14- to 17-year-olds to be indoors by 11 p.m. ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youths ," May 12). The reality is that there are 5- and 6-year-olds wandering the streets of Baltimore. Some parents have their young adolescent children making errands to corner stores at 2 a.m., which isn't safe. What is a young person under the age of 14 doing outside after 9 p.m. without a parent or guardian?
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
An article in late editions of The Sun yesterday stated incorrectly action taken by the Baltimore City Council concerning a new curfew law Thursday night. The curfew was tentatively approved and is up for final passage at Monday's council meeting.Also, the article should have said that the jail term for a second curfew violation is 60 days.The Sun regrets the errors.Hoping to protect Baltimore's youth from the ever-escalating violence in the streets, the City Council adopted a strict curfew yesterday that requires parents to keep their children inside at night or face tough fines.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
City Councilman Brandon Scott had the right idea this week when he said the bill he is sponsoring to toughen up the city's curfew law to require children under 14 to be indoors year-round by 9 p.m. is not about arresting kids or cutting crime rates. It's about keeping the city's young people safe, and that can't happen if they are allowed to wander the streets late at night. It's really the parents' responsibility to make sure their children are where they're supposed to be at all times, especially after dark.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 24, 1994
Union Bridge council members debated Monday night how effective the town's curfew law has been in keeping teens off the streets and out of trouble.Most members reported there had been no violations of the 1978 law, which says youngsters under age 18 should be inside by 10 p.m. on weeknights and by midnight Friday and Saturday.Council members recently called for stronger enforcement of the law when residents complained that teens were being disruptive late at night.But Councilwoman Bonnie Hyde said she felt the law wasn't being enforced, citing an incident on a recent Friday in which she saw 25 teens on a street corner near West Broadway at 11:30 p.m.Ms.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Town police chiefs and officials and town codesSun Staff Writer | July 24, 1995
New Windsor is the only one of Carroll County's eight municipalities where town leaders are battling juveniles who stay out late causing trouble. But officials in three other towns say they may revise their curfew laws so they would be prepared if problems arise.Manchester, Sykesville and Union Bridge officials are examining their curfew laws because of their similarity to Frederick's, which Maryland's highest court ruled last month was unconstitutional.The June 30 Court of Appeals ruling said Frederick's law was too vague about certain exceptions to the curfew.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1995
The state's highest court has struck down Frederick's curfew, ruling that its wording, which is identical to Baltimore's curfew law, is too vague to be constitutional.The Court of Appeals decision Friday may trigger a legal challenge to Baltimore's year-old law because the ruling warns that a municipality may be liable if it uses an unconstitutional curfew to detain juveniles, legal experts said."What it means is any municipality, like Baltimore, that continues to enforce a curfew that could be unconstitutional is doing so at its own peril," said Deborah A. Jeon, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Howard Libit and Melody Simmons and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writers | July 29, 1994
Children, do you know where your parents are?That is the question police will be asking tonight at 11 when Baltimore's tough new curfew law begins its second night.Technically, the curfew went into effect last night after the bill was signed, but police had no enforcement mechanism in place. Tonight, officers will be out looking for 12- and 13-year-old violators and will gradually enforce the law more aggressively, city officials said today. Children and their parents also will learn about the curfew from city school officials after classes begin in the fall, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
City police are cracking down on nighttime truancy, and children caught on the streets during curfew hours are detained at an East Baltimore site. The parents of repeat curfew-breakers can face fines of up to $300. The city curfew applies to those 16 and younger and lasts from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and from midnight to 6 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Col. Debbie Owens, chief of patrol, said first-time offenders will not be issued citations because many parents don't know about the curfew law. Juveniles picked up are taken to the Baltimore Truancy Assessment Center at 400 N. Caroline St., where a nighttime truancy program was restarted six weeks ago, Owens said.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
City Councilman Brandon Scott had the right idea this week when he said the bill he is sponsoring to toughen up the city's curfew law to require children under 14 to be indoors year-round by 9 p.m. is not about arresting kids or cutting crime rates. It's about keeping the city's young people safe, and that can't happen if they are allowed to wander the streets late at night. It's really the parents' responsibility to make sure their children are where they're supposed to be at all times, especially after dark.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun and By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Earlier this year, Baltimore Police made rare use of its Twitter account to float a policy proposal: " We are thinking about moving the juvenile curfew time to 10 pm ," the message read. "What do you think?" Within days, Police Commissioner Anthony Batts told residents at a community meeting that he had "stirred the pot" and was told to "leave [the idea] alone. " Now, city officials have united around the idea of moving up the city's youth curfew . City Councilman Brandon Scott said Monday he will introduce legislation that could require children younger than 14 to be off the streets by 9 p.m., and he unveiled the idea with the support of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young, and Batts.  Batts has established himself as a proponent of curfews in his leadership stints in three cities.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Top city leaders are supporting an effort to tighten Baltimore's curfew law that could require children younger than 14 to be off the street as early as 9 p.m. Councilman Brandon M. Scott introduced legislation Monday that would abolish the city's midnight curfew for children and teens and instead set a staggered deadline for youths to be indoors based on their age and whether school's in session. Scott called the current curfew - established nearly 20 years ago - absurd for failing to distinguish between an infant or teenager, and for allowing youths to stay outdoors so late.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun Reporter | July 12, 2008
It's about 3:20 a.m. when a mother in a smiley-face do-rag, sweats and pink bedroom slippers steps into the bright lights of the elementary school gymnasium, anything but happy as she scans a semicircle of kids in folding chairs for her teenage daughter. Close behind is a woman in all black, clutching a pack of Newport cigarettes. She shakes her head in disgust when her 16-year-old boy spots her and smiles broadly. These sleepy mothers have come to retrieve their children from Baltimore's new curfew center at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School in Barclay, open from midnight to 4 a.m. each Friday, Saturday and Sunday until school resumes this fall.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
City police are cracking down on nighttime truancy, and children caught on the streets during curfew hours are detained at an East Baltimore site. The parents of repeat curfew-breakers can face fines of up to $300. The city curfew applies to those 16 and younger and lasts from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and from midnight to 6 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Col. Debbie Owens, chief of patrol, said first-time offenders will not be issued citations because many parents don't know about the curfew law. Juveniles picked up are taken to the Baltimore Truancy Assessment Center at 400 N. Caroline St., where a nighttime truancy program was restarted six weeks ago, Owens said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
Concerned about Northern High School students who commit crimes while playing hooky, city police stepped up patrols in the area yesterday and arrested 33 truant Northern students. About 30 officers participated in operation "Be My Valentine." After stopping the students for violating the city's 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. curfew for children 16 and younger - and handcuffing at least some - officers returned them to Northern, where school officials suspended the youths and sent them home. The school's principal, Betty Donaldson, and School Police Chief Jansen M. Robinson did not return calls seeking comment.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
A group of Anne Arundel County residents is asking the County Council to create a curfew for people younger than age 17 that it believes would solve nuisance problems in neighborhoods. A curfew of midnight Friday and Saturday nights and 11 p.m. other nights has been requested by members of the county's Western District Police Community Relations Council. Under the proposal - based on the curfew law in Laurel City - it also would be illegal for children to be in public places when school is in session.
NEWS
December 27, 1997
THERE WAS A hell of a fight two years ago in Baltimore over the imposition of an updated juvenile curfew law. New data released this month by the U.S. Conference of Mayors indicates curfews are growing in popularity and are being given partial credit for drops in juvenile crime. The information suggests Baltimore was right to continue its curfew law, but public officials must keep in mind the tool has only limited value.Baltimore first imposed a curfew in 1983 that prohibited unsupervised minors from being on the street after 11 p.m. The shooting of a 10-year-old boy led to passage of an even tougher law in 1994, but it couldn't stand up to constitutional scrutiny.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
A group of Anne Arundel County residents is asking the County Council to create a curfew for people younger than age 17 that it believes would solve nuisance problems in neighborhoods. A curfew of midnight Friday and Saturday nights and 11 p.m. other nights has been requested by members of the county's Western District Police Community Relations Council. Under the proposal - based on the curfew law in Laurel City - it also would be illegal for children to be in public places when school is in session.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
A group of Anne Arundel County residents is asking the County Council to create a curfew for people younger than age 17 that it believes would solve nuisance problems in neighborhoods. A curfew of midnight Friday and Saturday nights and 11 p.m. other nights has been requested by members of the county's Western District Police Community Relations Council. Under the proposal - based on the curfew law in Laurel City - it also would be illegal for children to be in public places when school is in session.
NEWS
December 27, 1997
THERE WAS A hell of a fight two years ago in Baltimore over the imposition of an updated juvenile curfew law. New data released this month by the U.S. Conference of Mayors indicates curfews are growing in popularity and are being given partial credit for drops in juvenile crime. The information suggests Baltimore was right to continue its curfew law, but public officials must keep in mind the tool has only limited value.Baltimore first imposed a curfew in 1983 that prohibited unsupervised minors from being on the street after 11 p.m. The shooting of a 10-year-old boy led to passage of an even tougher law in 1994, but it couldn't stand up to constitutional scrutiny.
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