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NEWS
May 27, 2014
The Matthew A. Henson Neighborhood Association, which represents more than 1,000 homes, business and churches and is over 50 years old, recently unanimously opposed the Baltimore City Council's curfew bill ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youth," May 12). It is the sincere belief of our residents that passage of this bill will bring about both a discriminatory and arbitrary implementation. While we readily agree that we, as parents, first and foremost, and fellow residents, must significantly improve upon the actions and conduct of our children, the city has not fully and successfully implemented the current curfew.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In the first month of Baltimore's tough new youth curfew, about four kids a night were picked up by police - a smaller-than-expected number that supporters say shows the law is working. City officials say the figures - which show that police issued 120 curfew violations in the program's first 30 days - indicate that parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be inside at night. "The message has gotten out," said City Councilman Brandon M. Scott, who sponsored the curfew bill.
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NEWS
May 31, 2014
We are Baltimore youth with experiences of homelessness. We are trying to better ourselves and find somewhere to live and prosper. The mayor and City Council say they want to expand curfew hours to save kids and reduce crime ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youths," May 12). Instead of a curfew, what about helping homeless youth and other young people? A lot of kids who will be affected by an expanded curfew live in low-income areas. They don't have a yard to play in or a porch to sit on. What are they supposed to do?
NEWS
September 11, 2014
City officials report that Baltimore police picked up fewer children than expected on the streets late at night after the city's new curfew law went into effect last month. Supporters of the tougher curfew say that suggests parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be indoors at night. But others question whether it's simply a result of police not enforcing the law. While it may be too soon to judge how well the curfew is being enforced, ultimately the success of the new law will depend on families getting the counseling and other services they need to address the problems that led to their kids being out late in the first place.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Before the start of the next school year, Baltimore City youths will need to abide by a new curfew that calls for them to be off the street as early as 9 p.m. under legislation the City Council approved Monday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who pledged to sign the bill into law, said the measure will keep the city's children and teens safe and identify families in need of intervention. The law won't take effect until about mid-August, a delay that's expected to give the administration time to open a year-round curfew center.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
City officials report that Baltimore police picked up fewer children than expected on the streets late at night after the city's new curfew law went into effect last month. Supporters of the tougher curfew say that suggests parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be indoors at night. But others question whether it's simply a result of police not enforcing the law. While it may be too soon to judge how well the curfew is being enforced, ultimately the success of the new law will depend on families getting the counseling and other services they need to address the problems that led to their kids being out late in the first place.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Percy Smith is against Baltimore's new curfew. Like many of its critics, he's fine with keeping kids off the street late at night; he's just concerned about how it will be implemented. "I'm asking from an economic perspective," he said, "will this be Fells Point or East Baltimore?" He added later that he doesn't want a curfew "just protecting the Inner Harbor. " The Govans man and more than 100 other city residents came to Morgan State University on Monday night to learn about and voice their support of or opposition to the policy, which goes into effect Aug. 8. Residents asked pointed questions to a panel of city officials that included Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Councilman Brandon Scott, who sponsored the law. Some worried about how police will engage youths; others asked how parents will be held accountable for allowing their children to roam the city unsupervised.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Baltimore officials will open two youth centers in advance of the strict new curfew law that takes effect Aug. 8, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Thursday. The curfew centers will open early next month on the city's east and west sides with staffs of about eight, including police officers and social workers, to link young people and their families with services, officials said. The curfew — believed to be among the strictest in the country — will require unsupervised children to be indoors by as early as 9 p.m. It is designed to identify youths and families in need of help, not bring more youths into the criminal system, Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew - among the strictest in the country - takes effect Friday amid mixed reaction, with some parents saying it could help keep youths safe and experts noting that there's no evidence that it will. Police will begin taking children out too late without supervision to one of two curfew centers, where they will be evaluated and their families connected to services. "The primary goal of all of this is to make sure young people who may be in challenging situations late at night are able to get home safely," said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In the first month of Baltimore's tough new youth curfew, about four kids a night were picked up by police - a smaller-than-expected number that supporters say shows the law is working. City officials say the figures - which show that police issued 120 curfew violations in the program's first 30 days - indicate that parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be inside at night. "The message has gotten out," said City Councilman Brandon M. Scott, who sponsored the curfew bill.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew fell like an unseen curtain across the city Friday night, and on many blocks, children continued to play outside for the first few minutes, oblivious to the controversial law. But at Poe Homes in West Baltimore, two mothers sitting on their front porches said they were obeying the rules willingly and happily. "It gets dark at 8 o'clock," said Nicole Williams as her 8-year-old son, Isaiah Turner, ran around just before the new law fell into place. "What child has reason to be outside?"
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew - among the strictest in the country - takes effect Friday amid mixed reaction, with some parents saying it could help keep youths safe and experts noting that there's no evidence that it will. Police will begin taking children out too late without supervision to one of two curfew centers, where they will be evaluated and their families connected to services. "The primary goal of all of this is to make sure young people who may be in challenging situations late at night are able to get home safely," said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Two town hall meetings presenting the implementation of new curfew hours for Baltimore children left many attendees with serious unanswered questions ( "Residents see some gray areas in city's new curfew," July 21). While the mayor's presenting panel gave passionate testimony as to why the curfew is being enacted, the people of Baltimore were not allowed the time nor given the respect we were expecting. One member of the audience did ask for more time for the community to have input before the curfew start date, but that question was not answered.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Percy Smith is against Baltimore's new curfew. Like many of its critics, he's fine with keeping kids off the street late at night; he's just concerned about how it will be implemented. "I'm asking from an economic perspective," he said, "will this be Fells Point or East Baltimore?" He added later that he doesn't want a curfew "just protecting the Inner Harbor. " The Govans man and more than 100 other city residents came to Morgan State University on Monday night to learn about and voice their support of or opposition to the policy, which goes into effect Aug. 8. Residents asked pointed questions to a panel of city officials that included Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Councilman Brandon Scott, who sponsored the law. Some worried about how police will engage youths; others asked how parents will be held accountable for allowing their children to roam the city unsupervised.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
As Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake set out on foot Saturday to pitch an upcoming community forum on the city's new youth curfew law, the controversial measure drew — as it has in the past — a mixed response from residents. Charlie Heyman, an Ednor Gardens-Lakeside resident and father of seven, said children need more "structure" and responsibility in their lives. "I would love to have this enforced," Heyman, 49, said after shaking hands with the mayor. "I was raised on a curfew, and I see the benefits of a curfew.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Baltimore officials will open two youth centers in advance of the strict new curfew law that takes effect Aug. 8, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Thursday. The curfew centers will open early next month on the city's east and west sides with staffs of about eight, including police officers and social workers, to link young people and their families with services, officials said. The curfew — believed to be among the strictest in the country — will require unsupervised children to be indoors by as early as 9 p.m. It is designed to identify youths and families in need of help, not bring more youths into the criminal system, Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Two town hall meetings presenting the implementation of new curfew hours for Baltimore children left many attendees with serious unanswered questions ( "Residents see some gray areas in city's new curfew," July 21). While the mayor's presenting panel gave passionate testimony as to why the curfew is being enacted, the people of Baltimore were not allowed the time nor given the respect we were expecting. One member of the audience did ask for more time for the community to have input before the curfew start date, but that question was not answered.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Before the start of the next school year, Baltimore City youths will need to abide by a new curfew that calls for them to be off the street as early as 9 p.m. under legislation the City Council approved Monday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who pledged to sign the bill into law, said the measure will keep the city's children and teens safe and identify families in need of intervention. The law won't take effect until about mid-August, a delay that's expected to give the administration time to open a year-round curfew center.
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