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NEWS
June 14, 2013
The answer to the new stormwater fees and requirements is porous asphalt ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). When such asphalt is used, rainwater drains through the top layer and eventually runs back into the soil underneath the asphalt. This eliminates the need for drainage structures and drainage areas and stops runoff into ecologically sensitive or protected waterways. Moreover, it costs less overall than traditional paving options, is better for the environment and should be exempt from the high fees imposed by local governments.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
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NEWS
November 7, 2012
I would urge all voters to contact their election board and ask them to include a concise, one-page sample ballot at the polls to study as people wait in the long lines. It sure is irritating to see each voter spending so much time scratching their chin as they study each question and candidate. Many did not receive a sample ballot in the mail, and of those that did, they forgot to bring them. George B. Wroe, Glyndon
NEWS
April 29, 2014
Email sports copy to howardcountysports@patuxent.com by 9 a.m. Monday. Soccer Registration is open for WHC Soccer's Fall 2014 season . The recreational program is open to boys and girls ages 4-18. Register by June 30 for a $20 discount. WHC Soccer will make a donation to local participating school PTAs for each registered player. For more information or to register online, go to http://www.whcsoccer.org. The Soccer Association of Columbia will be holding tryouts for the Fall 2014/Spring 2015 travel season beginning May 14. The league is open to players ages 7 to 17. Go to sackick.com for the tryouts schedule. To register for all SAC programs, go to sackick.com, or for more information, contact asksac@sac-hc.org.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
As a retired educator, I read your article about growing student enrollments at area schools with keen interest ("Growing enrollments, aging schools, straitened finances," Aug. 23). In order to promote successful programs, increasing the tax base that supports public schools should be our number one priority if we are to guarantee our students the kind of education they will need in order to compete successfully with the rest of the world. Quinton D. Thompson, Towson
NEWS
December 19, 2009
Maryland's leg of the annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, held Oct. 18 in Hunt Valley, reached its $3 million goal, the local affiliate announced this week. The final tally shows the event drew 29,000 participants, 2,000 survivors and 1,000 volunteers. More than 75 percent of the money raised stays in Maryland to finance local research programs and assist breast cancer patients. The remaining money goes to Susan G. Komen for the Cure headquarters in Dallas, where it assists in national research projects, many of which take place at Maryland's top medical institutions.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | January 4, 2014
It has been 30 years since Dr. Robert Gallo became internationally famous for his role in the discovery of the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. He has wrestled with the question of a cure countless times since then. But only within the last year, he says, did he conclude that working toward a "functional cure" makes the most sense. AIDS has killed more than 36 million people around the world since the early 1980s. A similar number of people are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that Gallo and French scientists co-discovered.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
David Berdan likes the Komen Maryland Race for the Cure so much, he'll do it twice Sunday, once as the two-time defending champion of the Hunt Valley event and later as a family man whose loved ones have suffered from breast cancer . Before the race, Berdan, 30, said: "If I win again, awesome, because then I'll be interviewed and can talk about the campaign to end this disease. " In fact, the science teacher and cross-county coach at Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills did win again, topping the men's division Sunday morning.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
As the sun rose Sunday on the 19th Komen Maryland Race for the Cure, it illuminated a makeshift city nearly the size of Annapolis, all decked out in shades of pink ranging from the palest pastel to the hottest hue. And for one day, everyone looked fabulous in it. Cherub-cheeked toddlers. White-haired grandfathers. Rambunctious teenaged girls. Beefy men with hairy legs. "We are a community. We all have something in common," said all-in-pink Susan Willingham of Baltimore as she bounced up and down trying to stay warm.
FEATURES
October 4, 1998
Today is the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Race for the Cure: One-mile "fun" walk for all begins at 8:30 a.m. near Rash Field at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, followed by 5K walk/run for women at 8:40 a.m. A 5K walk/run for all begins at 9:25 a.m. Forms available at 6:30 a.m. Fee: $25. Call: 410-433-7223.Pub Date: 10/04/98
NEWS
By Cory Booker | April 23, 2014
This year, approximately 60,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson's, joining the 1 million people already living with the disease in the United States and the 4 million to 6 million diagnosed with it worldwide. Their painful struggle is one that I know all too well. I remember when my dad first had symptoms of Parkinson's, a motor system disorder that results from the loss of certain brain cells. For him, it started with a persistent numbness in his arm and hand that led to a decades-long battle with the ever-increasing symptoms that eventually took his life in 2013.
NEWS
By Robert Gallo | April 20, 2014
Wednesday is the 30-year anniversary of the day my colleagues and I reported that a new retrovirus, now known as HIV, was the agent causing AIDS. We also announced the development of an effective HIV blood test and the capacity to continuously produce the virus so that drugs could be tested. Since then, basic science has driven a better understanding of how HIV infects humans, resulting in the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Last summer the National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project reported that "a 20-year-old HIV-positive individual on ART in the U.S. or Canada is expected to live into their early 70s, a life expectancy approaching that in the general population.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
For two busy surgeons, the home they have created offers a serene retreat at the end of the day. Troy Pittman's and Michael Somenek's sleek condo at the Ritz-Carlton Residences provides a chance to relax and renew mind, body and spirit. The couple achieved this level of comfort with a simple design style: a clever use of natural and artificial light along with neutral decor and a discriminating use of color. One of their first tasks after moving in was to place every light switch on a dimmer.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | January 4, 2014
It has been 30 years since Dr. Robert Gallo became internationally famous for his role in the discovery of the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. He has wrestled with the question of a cure countless times since then. But only within the last year, he says, did he conclude that working toward a "functional cure" makes the most sense. AIDS has killed more than 36 million people around the world since the early 1980s. A similar number of people are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that Gallo and French scientists co-discovered.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Participation in the Komen Maryland Race for the Cure dropped for the second straight year, according to officials at the Sunday event. Yet those who braved the blustery climes to take part in the 21st annual event in Hunt Valley said they wouldn't dream of staying away. Thousands of runners, many wearing T-shirts decorated to commemorate loved ones who have either survived or died from cancer, began gathering for the event near the Hunt Valley Towne Centre well before dawn, eager to take part in a 5K competitive run or to walk for the cause.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Roads around Hunt Valley will be closed Sunday morning because of the Susan G. Komen Maryland Race for the Cure, according to Baltimore County police. Road closures will begin at 6 a.m. with traffic delays expected in some spots until 11:30 a.m. Police recommend that drivers avoid the area during that period. The route is a loop on streets in the area immediately south of the Hunt Valley Towne Centre. The streets affected by closures include Shawan Road, York Road, McCormick Road, Schilling Road, Beaver Dam Road, Gilroy Road and Schilling Circle.
NEWS
By Colorado Springs Gazette | March 21, 1999
An increasing body of evidence suggests that walking can cure what ails you.A Finnish study last year, significant for the large number of people who participated (16,000), showed that those who take as few as six brisk, 30-minute walks a month have a 43 percent lower risk of premature death than non-exercisers and a 29 percent lower risk than occasional exercisers.Until the 1970s, doctors and therapists commonly treated chronic back pain with bed rest. Then studies showed that being a full-time couch potato was less likely to cure patients than to make them one with the couch.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
A team of runners and walkers from Transformations Fitness for Women studios will participate in Sunday's Komen Maryland Race for the Cure, but their team will be much smaller than previous years. The fitness studio with three Baltimore area locations signed up 342 people to its team in 2011 and raised nearly $24,000. So far this year, 280 people have signed up, and they've raised about $16,000. Shelley Sharkey, who owns Transformations' Catonsville location, said the teams lost some runners this year because of a decision by the national Komen organization to stop funding social-services organization Planned Parenthood.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The answer to the new stormwater fees and requirements is porous asphalt ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). When such asphalt is used, rainwater drains through the top layer and eventually runs back into the soil underneath the asphalt. This eliminates the need for drainage structures and drainage areas and stops runoff into ecologically sensitive or protected waterways. Moreover, it costs less overall than traditional paving options, is better for the environment and should be exempt from the high fees imposed by local governments.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
Oh, no! Here we go again with another "awareness conversation" ("Breast cancer: Angelina Jolie starts the conversation," May 16). After the fortunes raised by Race for the Cure and the other breast cancer groups, must we consider having both our breasts removed? I'm beginning to think being a woman is a life-long death sentence. In "starting the conversation," why didn't Angelina Jolie mention how much her surgery, reconstruction and rehabilitation cost? If an initial exam is $3,000, what is the price of the entire procedure?
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