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Curbside Recycling

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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
The county launches its curbside recycling program Wednesday for residents in unincorporated areas, but most municipalities won't begin their programs until later this summer.The dozen or so trash haulers serving residents outside municipal borders are required to offer curbside recycling by Wednesday in order to secure a solid-waste collection license from the county. Several haulers are waiting to receive equipment and will start their recycling programs later.Recycling is voluntary for residents in unincorporated areas.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 20, 2012
Recycling is the right thing to do. By now, only the resentful, the slothful and people who want to abolish the Federal Reserve must feel otherwise. We're all supposed to remove junk mail, jugs, cans and bottles from the trash so that the paper, plastics, aluminum and glass from them might be used again. Americans lead the world in per-capita trash, so the more trash we recycle, the less we have to bury in landfills. That's the basic understanding. All but the cranky, the indolent and the tree-hugger-haters are well past acceptance of this idea.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | July 28, 1991
Positive responses to a survey on curbside recycling have been pouring in to the city offices for the past month.The town surveyed 1,200 families to gauge interest in the plan."
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
As Baltimore County residents start raking their leaves into bags, the street or their neighbor's yard, the Department of Public Works is launching its campaign to make sure the fallen foliage doesn't find its way into gutters and storm drains. The department will collect bagged leaves from curbs to reduce the amount of trash brought to county landfills and to protect the environment in other ways. The county encourages residents to dispose of their leaves by using them for compost or mulch, but the Bureau of Solid Waste Management hauls away tons of yard debris for recycling each fall.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
Curbside recycling will come to Manchester in November, following the Town Council's approval last night of a new 14-month contract with the town's trash hauler.The contract with Hughes Trash Removal Inc. calls for weekly pickup of trash and recyclables at the doorsteps of the town's 975 households.The approximately $44,000 price tag for the new contract represents an increase of more than $13,000 over the current agreement.Town officials had budgeted as much as $20,000 for the added cost of recycling when they passed the 1993 budget in May.Residents will have trash and recyclables picked up at the same time on Wednesdays under the agreement, which goes into effect Nov. 1. The first trash pickup under the contract is Nov. 4.Residents will be able to place recyclable material at the curb in containers of their choice.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Contributing writer | November 11, 1990
Curbside recycling is out and a mammoth trash-sorting facility is in as part of a plan by Harford administrators to meet state-ordered reductions in garbage.After delays, glitches and plenty of fine-tuning, Harford's plan to reduce county waste by the state-mandated 15 percent is ready for shipment to the County Council, said Robert Donald, director of the county Department of Public Works.Over the last few weeks, revisions ordered by County Executive Habern Freeman Jr. were inserted into the plan, which could land before the council in December, said Donald.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 26, 2001
SOMETHING wrong with this picture: Baltimore County proudly announces that its curbside recycling program has been setting records and raising sweet amounts of cash to offset the cost of trash removal while the city of Baltimore gloomily announces that it needs to cut its underachieving blue-bag program to save $500,000. I know: The county doesn't have a violent-crime crisis, a shrinking population and tax base, and the highest concentration of the state's poor. But maybe it also has smarter management of its government and, when it comes to recycling, maybe a stronger public-awareness effort to get more of its residents to participate.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Heather Dresbach tossed an empty soda bottle into the trash Sunday."I said, 'No,' " her mother, Nancy, recalled yesterday. For the Dresbach family on Rosalie Avenue in northeast Baltimore, and about 20,000 other families in the city, used soda bottles, milk jugs and other recyclables no longer are to be considered castaways bound for the dump.Yesterday marked the start of Baltimore's large-scale curbside recycling effort, at 1,700 homes in certain northeast and north-central neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
Some County Council members say they want more information before deciding whether to support the county executive's proposed curbside recycling plan.And some trash haulers in the county also say the government should do more research before launching a program based on residential sorting of recyclables.Under County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's plan, county residents who want to recycle would buy special blue plastic trash bags to hold glass, aluminum cans and other recyclables.The blue bags wouldbe collected along with other trash, taken to the county's waste-to-energy facility on Aberdeen Proving Ground and sorted before being sold.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
Take your raked up leaves and recycle them during a once-a-week curbside recycling service sponsored by Howard County.This program can help save taxpayers money and space in the local landfills. Leaves may be put out with newspapers.Almost all of Howard County's curbside recycling routes accept leaves and yard waste through December. Here are the communities that will take the leaves in unlimited quantities: Elkridge, Ellicott City east of Bethany Lane, Scaggsville east of Route 29, all Howard County routes in North Laurel and Columbia.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Gady A. Epstein and Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
The city's "blue bag" curbside recycling program might be spared the budget-cutting knife after all. Mayor Martin O'Malley gave local environmental activists 30 days yesterday to devise a plan to make the recycling program profitable -- a goal activists believe they can reach. "I'm optimistic," O'Malley said after meeting yesterday afternoon with more than a half-dozen recycling advocates. O'Malley's preliminary budget plan called for cutting curbside collection of glass, metals and plastics to save the city as much as $500,000 a year, part of a larger effort to cut tens of millions of dollars in spending to balance next year's budget.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Curbing recycling will ultimately worsen city's `grime crisis' Blue-bag recycling is more than a feel-good service. It's a solution to the crisis of running out of land to bury Baltimore's trash. We should be trying to increase participation and close the recycling loop, not backtracking on hard-won curbside service ("City to dump blue bags," March 20). When drugs first swept onto Baltimore's corners in the late 1980s, a nationwide recession followed hot on their heels, and the city froze the hiring of police to make fiscal ends meet.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 26, 2001
SOMETHING wrong with this picture: Baltimore County proudly announces that its curbside recycling program has been setting records and raising sweet amounts of cash to offset the cost of trash removal while the city of Baltimore gloomily announces that it needs to cut its underachieving blue-bag program to save $500,000. I know: The county doesn't have a violent-crime crisis, a shrinking population and tax base, and the highest concentration of the state's poor. But maybe it also has smarter management of its government and, when it comes to recycling, maybe a stronger public-awareness effort to get more of its residents to participate.
NEWS
March 21, 2001
THIS IS A SAD day for everyone who supplemented their education with the wisdom of Kermit the Frog. Baltimore's decision to scale down the curbside recycling program shows he was dead right when he sang, "It's Not Easy Being Green." With a big budget deficit looming, it's hard to argue against Mayor Martin O'Malley's belt-tightening efforts. But the end of pickups for glass, metal and plastic through the 10-year-old program -- just like the closing of public libraries -- also scrubs a secondary service whose elimination carries a devastating symbolic impact.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2001
It appears Baltimore's budget woes have laid waste to another victim: curbside recycling of bottles, cans and other plastics, glass and metals. The city plans to discontinue the pickup of so-called "blue bags" of bottles and cans by June 30, saving more than $500,000 during the next fiscal year, officials said yesterday. Curbside recycling was a major goal of local environmental and community activists for years before the program started in 1990. Recycling pickup of mixed paper will not be affected by the cut, and the city will maintain drop-off sites for glass, plastic and metal.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
WHEN HOWARD and Baltimore county residents gained curbside recycling, they gave up one of their two trash-collection days. Sure, some people grumbled, but many saw it as an even swap. Anne Arundel County should have done the same when it began curbside recycling in 1991. But it didn't. Local governments started curbside recycling, after all, to discourage citizens from carelessly discarding reusable materials such as plastic, aluminum, cereal boxes and newspapers. Here, the message wasn't clear.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
A telephone survey in Sykesville reached less than 20 percent of the town's households, but officials are calling it a boon to charting the municipal future.Results show that 74 percent of the respondents were pleased with local government. That was a comforting pat on the back for the mayor and six-member council. The margin for error was about 6 percent."Our approval rating was unusually high for a government," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "The research shows governments usually get around 30 percent approval."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
A telephone survey in Sykesville reached less than 20 percent of the town's households, but officials are calling it a boon to charting the municipal future.Results show that 74 percent of the respondents were pleased with local government. That was a comforting pat on the back for the mayor and six-member council. The margin for error was about 6 percent."Our approval rating was unusually high for a government," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "The research shows governments usually get around 30 percent approval."
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