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NEWS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff Writer | March 29, 1992
You've made all the arrangements to put your house up for sale, going through countless discussions on equity, multiple listing and setting a price -- but have you made sure your house has curb appeal?What's curb appeal?"It's that first appearance -- how the house looks when you pull up to the curb," explains Jim Mattingly, president of Vantage Real Estate, a realty with several locations in Anne Arundel County. He saysthat many homes go unsold because of their initial appearance to prospective buyers.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
A Colonial-style home sitting on an acre in Howard County's CattaiI Ridge neighborhood is on the market for $939,000. "The first point you notice when you see the house is its presence," said listing agent Ronna Corman-Chew of Long & Foster Realtors in Ellicott City. "This house has magnificent curb appeal. After that, there is a very open floor plan that is just beautiful. " Adjacent to the Cattail Creek Country Club golf course, the two-story brick and Hardie plank-sided home offers 5,277 square feet of living space.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones- Bonbrest and Nancy Jones- Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2009
After three years of placing her Harford County house on the market only to take it off again when interest in the house waned or when offers came in lower than expected, Christine McGreevy decided to get serious. So, with the help of her real estate agent, she hired a home stager and professional photographer to get her house looking its best. Part of that work included sprucing up the home's exterior by replacing lighting fixtures, adding flowers and plants, placing a rocking chair on the front porch and buying a new American flag.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones- Bonbrest and Nancy Jones- Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2009
After three years of placing her Harford County house on the market only to take it off again when interest in the house waned or when offers came in lower than expected, Christine McGreevy decided to get serious. So, with the help of her real estate agent, she hired a home stager and professional photographer to get her house looking its best. Part of that work included sprucing up the home's exterior by replacing lighting fixtures, adding flowers and plants, placing a rocking chair on the front porch and buying a new American flag.
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas and Trif Alatzas,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | March 16, 2003
Whether a mailbox is shaped like a fish or encased in brick, homeowners willing to invest several hundred dollars in one are offering passers-by a glimpse of their personality or boosting the curb appeal of their home. A largemouth bass has swallowed a standard black mailbox along Mountain Road in Fallston. A brick mailbox on Harford Road near Fork was built to look like the house it serves and to protect the mail from vandals who knocked over its predecessors with baseball bats. "It makes us feel good about the house," said Kelli Dial, who with her boyfriend had a brick mailbox installed last summer because vandals batted down four $8 mailboxes in a year.
BUSINESS
By ANNE LAUREN HENSLEE and ANNE LAUREN HENSLEE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
1. Keep landscaping trimmed and outdoor areas neat. 2. Clean, paint or refinish the front door. 3. Eliminate clutter. Make sure closets and other areas are in order. Keep garbage, lawn mowers and hoses out of site. 4. Make repairs to gutters, chimneys and driveway. 5. Wash wallpaper, tiles, paneling, floors, carpets, tubs and showers. 6. Paint or wash the exterior of the home, including windows, shutters, siding and doors. 7. Brighten rooms by painting. Choose colors based on what will appeal to the most buyers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | January 25, 2007
Amante Pizza and Pasta, a Sykesville restaurant that opened in November, has two strikes against it before you even walk in the door. It lacks both location and curb appeal. Potential customers driving past the sad little building on a lonely stretch of Liberty Road won't know that the restaurant is actually quite charming on the inside. Poor:]
BUSINESS
June 1, 2003
Survey finds many homeowners want more curb appeal Most homeowners believe the front of their home could use some improvements to enhance the curb appeal in any real estate sale. That's according to a recent Rust-Oleum Corp. survey of 1,500 Americans. The survey found that 82 percent of homeowners believe the front areas of their homes could use some work. And 42 percent of the respondents said they would make recommendations for a neighbor's home if they could do it anonymously. Real estate experts insist that curb appeal is the most important and least expensive way to sell a house.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | October 21, 2007
Food *** (3 stars) Service ** (2 stars) Atmosphere**1/2 (2 1/2 stars) I didn't give My Thai, Mount Vernon's new Thai restaurant, much chance to survive until I ate there. Basement restaurants by their nature don't have much curb appeal. Add to that the competition: Thairish in the same block (true, it's mostly carry out), Thai Landing -- almost a Baltimore institution -- farther north on Charles, and Ban Thai just to its south. Poor:]
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2004
When Doug and Leslie Kornreich decided to sell their Elkridge home, they knew they would have to spruce up the place inside and out before listing it for sale. It was important to them to have the house in tiptop shape to boost its value, he said. "The idea is to get a good price as well as get it to sell quickly." The first impression is critical when selling a house. Buyers form an opinion even before walking into a home, say experts. The way the house is viewed from the outside, known as curb appeal, often can help or hurt a sale.
BUSINESS
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | April 13, 2008
A few years ago, when Alicia Morgan-Cooper and her husband Fred decided they needed more space for their growing family, several items on their house-hunting list were non-negotiable. "We wanted plenty of trees and greenery, a large backyard for the kids, and it had to have a garden," says Morgan-Cooper, a pediatrician and mother of two, with a baby on the way. "I'm an avid gardener, and my garden is my sanctuary." In spring 2005, the couple moved into their dream home, a six-bedroom colonial situated on half an acre in the city's Guilford neighborhood.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | October 21, 2007
Food *** (3 stars) Service ** (2 stars) Atmosphere**1/2 (2 1/2 stars) I didn't give My Thai, Mount Vernon's new Thai restaurant, much chance to survive until I ate there. Basement restaurants by their nature don't have much curb appeal. Add to that the competition: Thairish in the same block (true, it's mostly carry out), Thai Landing -- almost a Baltimore institution -- farther north on Charles, and Ban Thai just to its south. Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | January 25, 2007
Amante Pizza and Pasta, a Sykesville restaurant that opened in November, has two strikes against it before you even walk in the door. It lacks both location and curb appeal. Potential customers driving past the sad little building on a lonely stretch of Liberty Road won't know that the restaurant is actually quite charming on the inside. Poor:]
FEATURES
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2006
For years, we relegated gardens to the back yard or to discretely planted aprons around the house. But lately, gardeners -- hungry for beauty and eager to embellish any bit of earth available -- have begun to create curbside gardens. "People want to see some color when they pull in," says Kelly Williams, manager of Kingsdene Nurseries and Garden Center in Monkton. Many also want to make a personal statement. "They want their house to stand out," Williams added. Curbside gardens can enhance the strip between curb and sidewalk, the napkin of ground around the mailbox, or even the dirt around street trees, which can host a gorgeous collection of tough shade-lovers like hosta and coral bells (Heuchera)
NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
Along a block of North Calvert Street, surrounded by crumbling and boarded-up rowhouses, homebuyers are shelling out $400,000 and more for luxury townhouses sprouting on the site of long-demolished buildings. At Clipper Mill in Hampden, residents are moving into a cluster of former industrial buildings converted to apartments and condominiums and are snapping up new townhouses. And in Owings Mills, bulldozers have just begun digging ground for a nearly 50-acre town center of homes, offices, shops, restaurants, a hotel, community college branch and public library.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
It began simply as a wedding present from father to son. But could Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, have ever envisioned that his gift of Homewood House to son Charles Jr. would keep giving? Today, Homewood House, built in 1801, is the property of Johns Hopkins University. It is open for tours, workshops, programs and its annual "Homewood by Candlelight" holiday event (this year it's from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Dec. 6). The house endures as one of the finest examples of Federal period residential architecture.
BUSINESS
By Adriane Miller and Adriane Miller,Special to The Sun | October 14, 1990
Location, the right price and good financing all play major roles in influencing the decision to buy a house. But curb appeal -- the first impression a potential buyer gets of a house -- is the lure that gets the buying process started.Without curb appeal -- the favorable first impression that makes a casual shopper sit up and take notice -- potential buyers may never cross the threshold to see what's inside.In Harford County, where home sales are up 12 percent from last year, Realtors say that giving a home curb appeal is simple and can be inexpensive.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 2000
Real estate brokers often say that one of the most important features of a house is its curb appeal. And the most eye-catching aspect of a house, the brokers say, is usually the front door. Homeowners with even the most ordinary-looking houses can get a healthy infusion of curb appeal, the brokers say, by simply replacing a drab, nondescript entryway with a new low-maintenance, energy-efficient front door. "This is the first thing people really focus on when they approach your house," said Aris Crist, an architect in Greenwich, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2004
When Doug and Leslie Kornreich decided to sell their Elkridge home, they knew they would have to spruce up the place inside and out before listing it for sale. It was important to them to have the house in tiptop shape to boost its value, he said. "The idea is to get a good price as well as get it to sell quickly." The first impression is critical when selling a house. Buyers form an opinion even before walking into a home, say experts. The way the house is viewed from the outside, known as curb appeal, often can help or hurt a sale.
BUSINESS
By ANNE LAUREN HENSLEE and ANNE LAUREN HENSLEE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
1. Keep landscaping trimmed and outdoor areas neat. 2. Clean, paint or refinish the front door. 3. Eliminate clutter. Make sure closets and other areas are in order. Keep garbage, lawn mowers and hoses out of site. 4. Make repairs to gutters, chimneys and driveway. 5. Wash wallpaper, tiles, paneling, floors, carpets, tubs and showers. 6. Paint or wash the exterior of the home, including windows, shutters, siding and doors. 7. Brighten rooms by painting. Choose colors based on what will appeal to the most buyers.
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