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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | April 8, 2004
Coffee is not my thing. So when a representative of Philips called me to try out the Senseo Coffee Maker, I called in an expert. My mother loves coffee, and I made a few cups for her using this art deco machine. The Senseo ($69), designed by Philips, launched in 2001 in the Netherlands where it became a big hit with the Dutch, according to the manufacturer. Now, it's available in American stores and at Amazon.com. Sleek and cool-looking, the Senseo looks like it means business. The idea is that the gadget uses coffee pods - ground coffee in a porous package - to make single servings of coffee.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 6, 2007
One of the ongoing story lines of professional sports has been the use of performance-enhancing substances. Or anything stronger than a cough drop, it would seem. What's that? No cough drops, either? Huh. Anyway, a reader wrote as a result of one of our posts, perhaps it was the Barry Bonds-asterisk thing last week, that this business of competitors and drug testing can crop up in the most unlikely of places - like bridge, for instance. In fact, one bridge player was stripped of a medal five years ago for refusing to take a drug test.
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FEATURES
By Betsy Hornick and Betsy Hornick,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 14, 2001
Chances are you're reading this with a cup of coffee, tea or soda within reach. Rest assured, the evidence so far on such caffeine-containing beverages suggests you can take another sip without worry. "When it comes to unexplained health problems, it's easy to point a finger at caffeine, especially since caffeine does have effects on the body," says Dr. Herbert Muncie, a family-practice physician and professor at the University of Maryland. But Muncie agrees with other experts who believe that caffeine's effects do not pose health risks for most people.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
Lewis E. Pearce Sr., a retired Baltimore County herb farmer who ascribed his longevity to his wife's cooking - and especially her homemade fudge - died Saturday of congestive heart failure at his Glen Arm home. He was 107. Mr. Pearce was born at home in Glen Arm, and then moved to a 12-acre farm that his parents had purchased in 1906, where he would live and work for the rest of his life. "He was born Jan. 12, 1900, and often joked that if only his mother had gone into labor 12 days earlier, he could say that he had lived in three centuries," said Elaine Pearce, a daughter-in-law.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 23, 2005
Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in the world, consumed in coffee, tea and soft drinks by hundreds of millions of people to get started in the morning and as a pick-me-up during the day. That people like the jolt they get from caffeine is no secret, but what caffeine does in the brain has been unknown. Now Austrian researchers using brain imaging technology have discovered that caffeine perks up the part of the brain involved in short-term memory, which helps us focus attention on the tasks at hand.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,New York Times News Service | September 14, 1995
With coffee bars proliferating from Seattle to Baltimore, and the specialty coffees they feature promising to turn around a decades-long decline in American coffee consumption, the news about coffee's effects on health is surprisingly good.A substantial amount of research, including several large studies done in the last few years, has turned up little solid scientific evidence to indict a moderate intake of coffee or caffeine as a serious or even minor health threat."Some of the most serious hazards that were linked to caffeine in the past have not panned out," said Dr. James L. Mills, who studies caffeine's effects on pregnancy at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | June 7, 1994
Women today are deluged with information about what is and is not good to do during pregnancy -- or while they are trying to get pregnant. They are careful to eat proper nutrients. They give up smoking. They exercise and cut out alcohol.For many women, a good cup of coffee in the morning is probably the only treat they do allow themselves.But new studies have claimed that pregnant women who consume as little as 48 milligrams of caffeine a day may have a greater risk of miscarriage than those who consume no caffeine.
HEALTH
By Gerri Kobren | October 16, 1990
Coffee has taken its share of lumps in recent years, but grounds for concern about coffee's apparent relationship with heart disease have shifted drastically.Caffeine used to be considered the culprit, but caffeine may now be in the clear as de-caf, once the wise alternative, has come under suspicion.The latest wisdom appeared last Thursday: Based on a study of 45,589 male medical professionals, Harvard researchers reported that up to six cups of caffeinated coffee per day had no ill effects in the heart or coronary arteries.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | November 6, 2007
One of the ongoing story lines of professional sports has been the use of performance-enhancing substances. Or anything stronger than a cough drop, it would seem. What's that? No cough drops, either? Huh. Anyway, a reader wrote as a result of one of our posts, perhaps it was the Barry Bonds-asterisk thing last week, that this business of competitors and drug testing can crop up in the most unlikely of places - like bridge, for instance. In fact, one bridge player was stripped of a medal five years ago for refusing to take a drug test.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 26, 2007
CHICAGO -- Pregnant coffee drinkers, take heart: A new study provides evidence that the mother's moderate caffeine intake will not cause a baby to be born early or underweight. Doctors still agree it's probably not a good idea to have 10 grande lattes a day. But with the new data, "you're essentially telling women, `Don't worry about it.' We can drink coffee during pregnancy and not have problems," said Dr. Marilynn Frederiksen, a maternal fetal medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 26, 2007
CHICAGO -- Pregnant coffee drinkers, take heart: A new study provides evidence that the mother's moderate caffeine intake will not cause a baby to be born early or underweight. Doctors still agree it's probably not a good idea to have 10 grande lattes a day. But with the new data, "you're essentially telling women, `Don't worry about it.' We can drink coffee during pregnancy and not have problems," said Dr. Marilynn Frederiksen, a maternal fetal medicine specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By JOHN FAUBER and JOHN FAUBER,MCCLATCHEY-TRIBUNE | July 14, 2006
When it comes to your heart, coffee has taken a couple of lumps in the past year, although in a recent large study it got a clean bill of health. Tea, on the other hand, consistently is portrayed as a heart-healthy beverage, although the Food and Drug Administration recently denied that claim once again. Coffee and tea have been studied intensely in the past several years, and while medical science has not definitively decided how the popular beverages affect the heart, it is inching closer to a conclusion.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | June 29, 2006
My sandy-haired, gap-toothed daughter has written "I love Daddy" in green chalk on the driveway, and of course it's gratifying to get this endorsement, but a father is never sure if he's doing the right thing or not. I am an indulgent parent who wants to make her happy, but instead of taking her to swim class, I wonder if I shouldn't send her to hoeing school. I learned to hoe when I was her age and soon thereafter to pick potatoes. How will she find happiness if she doesn't learn about work?
NEWS
March 10, 2006
Epidemiology Immunizations cut measles deaths A worldwide immunization drive cut measles deaths by almost 50 percent between 1999 and 2004, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund announced today. Global deaths attributed to measles fell from 871,000 to 454,000 over the five-year period. The largest reduction, 60 percent, occurred in sub-Saharan Africa, the region with the highest incidence of the disease. SUN STAFF Astronomy Next sunspot cycle to be stronger Scientists say the next sunspot cycle - the season of solar storms that can disrupt satellites and global positioning systems - will begin late next year and will be up to 50 percent stronger than the last one. Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research also say the next 11-year cycle will be a year late and reach its peak about 2012.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 23, 2005
Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in the world, consumed in coffee, tea and soft drinks by hundreds of millions of people to get started in the morning and as a pick-me-up during the day. That people like the jolt they get from caffeine is no secret, but what caffeine does in the brain has been unknown. Now Austrian researchers using brain imaging technology have discovered that caffeine perks up the part of the brain involved in short-term memory, which helps us focus attention on the tasks at hand.
BUSINESS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 2005
Whether you make it at home or get it from your neighborhood shop, that cup of morning coffee is about to get a lot more expensive. Blame it on the weather in other parts of the world and on your fellow coffee drinkers, who are drinking more cups of joe. Don't be surprised if a $4 coffee drink appears soon on the menu board at your favorite gourmet coffeehouse. Droughts in Brazil and Vietnam and continued high demand are conspiring to drive coffee prices to new four-year highs almost daily.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 11, 1990
The largest study to date on coffee-drinking and heart disease has found no evidence that moderate amounts of the stimulating brew increase the risk of heart attacks or stroke.A slight increase in heart disease risk showed up among drinkers of decaffeinated coffee, but researchers said the link was not confirmed anddid not justify switching from decaf to regular.The two-year study of more than 45,000 men seems likely to put to rest, at least for now, suspicions that caffeine -- whether in the form of coffee, tea, colas or candy -- might have adverse effects on the heart and blood vessels.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2001
Q. I have suffered migraines all my life. During the past few years, they got worse. Someone suggested I see an allergist. I discovered I am allergic to a lot of the foods I had been eating every day, including coffee, wheat, rice, oats, eggs and tomatoes. Now that I have changed my diet, my head is much better. A. Some people might be sensitive to certain foods. The most notorious are red wine and other alcoholic beverages. Coffee, tea, icy drinks, ice cream, chocolate, aged cheese, nuts, soy-based foods and pork have also been reported as triggers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | April 8, 2004
Coffee is not my thing. So when a representative of Philips called me to try out the Senseo Coffee Maker, I called in an expert. My mother loves coffee, and I made a few cups for her using this art deco machine. The Senseo ($69), designed by Philips, launched in 2001 in the Netherlands where it became a big hit with the Dutch, according to the manufacturer. Now, it's available in American stores and at Amazon.com. Sleek and cool-looking, the Senseo looks like it means business. The idea is that the gadget uses coffee pods - ground coffee in a porous package - to make single servings of coffee.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
At 1:30 a.m., Annie Spoonire awakens in her Millersville home. Two hours later, she is pointing her 1990 aqua-and-silver Plymouth through the morning darkness toward the popular Bel-Loc Diner in Towson, where she will dispense hot coffee and hard-earned wisdom from her counter pulpit. On this particular morning, she is on a familiar mission. She has to make coffee, fill the salt shakers, squeeze the oranges for juice, wipe down the counters and booths. When the diner opens at 6 a.m. -- pot of decaf in one hand, jet fuel in the other -- she greets the sleepy-eyed customers in a profession some believe attracts the most tireless and least appreciated working women.
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