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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
Eight months after the Victorian cupola of a historic Sheppard Pratt hospital building in Towson collapsed in a four-alarm fire, work crews raised a 17,000-pound replacement yesterday afternoon. The installation restores the 113-year-old tower of the B Building, which, with its companion A Building, is on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. The cupola's replacement also provides a sense of closure for psychiatric patients traumatized by last summer's fire and ensuing evacuation, hospital staff said.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Picture an old cupola sitting in the middle of a meadow, kept company by its bell, base and tower. "It's a lost art. They don't make them like this anymore," Mel Wilkins, 66, said yesterday as he and other local volunteers inspected the curves and squares of the former Anne Arundel County Courthouse embellishments wrought from mahogany, copper and white cedar. "All together, this structure would be 30 feet tall," he added. The beautifully crafted objects date back more than 50 years and are the only surviving pieces of the courthouse, which was demolished a decade ago on Church Circle in downtown Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1997
A 19th-century cupola that survived more than 100 years atop a piano factory near Camden Yards and was nearly lost to the construction of Oriole Park may now be scrapped to make way for the football stadium.The cupola was built for the sprawling Knabe Brothers Piano Co., which opened in 1869. The piano factory was later converted into an ice cream cone factory for Maryland Cup Corp., and was torn down in 1989 to make way for parking south of Oriole Park.The cupola was moved in 1989 to the roof of Herbert Greenbaum & Associates cabinet company, where it was a familiar sight for motorists on Interstate 395.The Greenbaum building was purchased and demolished this year to make way for stadium parking.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG and JOHN EISENBERG,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
A century ago this year, a filly named Whimsical pulled away in the stretch on a sunny Tuesday afternoon to win the Preakness Stakes - at Gravesend Race Track in Brooklyn, N.Y. That's right, New York. The 1906 running of Baltimore's signature sports event was one of 16 staged far from the city between 1890 and 1908, when the current doomsday scenario for Maryland racing - the Preakness' departure - was a reality. But the race's profile was so low then, before today's popular Triple Crown format was established, that few Marylanders noticed it was gone.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
Saved from possible destruction, a 19th-century cupola that used to grace the top of a Baltimore cabinet company building finally will get a new home -- as an Inner Harbor ice cream stand.The Maryland Stadium Authority will be glad to be rid of the 1-ton structure, which has been sitting for seven months in a Camden Yards parking lot while the Ravens stadium goes up. The Baltimore Museum of Industry, soon to become the cupola's owner if everything goes as planned, is happy to have it.And People Encouraging People Inc., a nonprofit organization that hopes to turn the 13-foot-wide, 20-foot-high dome into an ice cream business, can't wait to start using it, with the museum's permission.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
The cupola atop the Towson courthouse was the target of criticism from the moment it was completed in 1856. Judged too tall, the 70-foot octagonal structure was reduced by more than half only seven years later. Now repairs are again being made -- but nothing as drastic as that first refitting. Manolis Painting Co. of Timonium is stripping away layers of lead paint and replacing broken windows on the structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Baltimore County landmark.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Picture an old cupola sitting in the middle of a meadow, kept company by its bell, base and tower. "It's a lost art. They don't make them like this anymore," Mel Wilkins, 66, said yesterday as he and other local volunteers inspected the curves and squares of the former Anne Arundel County Courthouse embellishments wrought from mahogany, copper and white cedar. "All together, this structure would be 30 feet tall," he added. The beautifully crafted objects date back more than 50 years and are the only surviving pieces of the courthouse, which was demolished a decade ago on Church Circle in downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Johnathon E. Briggs and Richard Irwin and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
Severe thunderstorms moving rapidly across Maryland last night fired off a bolt of lightning that struck the five-story cupola of a Victorian building housing psychiatric patients at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson, sparking a four-alarm fire. One female patient was reported injured during the evacuation of 51 residents and 10 staff members from the historic brick structure on the 110-acre campus off the 6500 block of N. Charles St. Baltimore County firefighters from as far as Pikesville and Providence fought the blaze for more than an hour but could not save the ornate, 19th- century rooftop section, which collapsed in flames.
NEWS
November 4, 1994
State and Annapolis investigators yesterday were investigating the cause of a late-night fire that damaged the roof near the cupola on the Louis L. Goldstein Treasury Building at 80 Calvert St.Annapolis Fire Department crews extinguished the fire, which broke out at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday.Damage to the building, which is 35 years old, was estimated at about $2,000, said Cpl. Leonard Clark, a Fire Department spokesman. The cupola's interior was not damaged, but some of its wood panels were charred, he said.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
The 51 psychiatric patients displaced by Wednesday's four-alarm fire at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson returned to their living quarters yesterday, as hospital officials and historic preservationists alike expressed relief that damage wasn't worse. Lightning struck a cupola atop a five-story section of a 19th-century red-brick building when severe storms blew through the area at 7:58 p.m. Wednesday. The resulting blaze caused the cupola's roof - with ornate slate and gingerbread trim - to collapse.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2005
Cross Street Market in Federal Hill is undergoing a $1.3 million face-lift over the next two months, temporarily shutting down a popular seafood bar as part of the first major renovation since the structure was built more than 50 years ago. In an effort to better mesh with other revitalization projects in the South Baltimore neighborhood, the market's entrances - now marked by a retro-style multicolored cupola - will feature a new brick facade with a...
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
Eight months after the Victorian cupola of a historic Sheppard Pratt hospital building in Towson collapsed in a four-alarm fire, work crews raised a 17,000-pound replacement yesterday afternoon. The installation restores the 113-year-old tower of the B Building, which, with its companion A Building, is on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. The cupola's replacement also provides a sense of closure for psychiatric patients traumatized by last summer's fire and ensuing evacuation, hospital staff said.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
The 51 psychiatric patients displaced by Wednesday's four-alarm fire at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson returned to their living quarters yesterday, as hospital officials and historic preservationists alike expressed relief that damage wasn't worse. Lightning struck a cupola atop a five-story section of a 19th-century red-brick building when severe storms blew through the area at 7:58 p.m. Wednesday. The resulting blaze caused the cupola's roof - with ornate slate and gingerbread trim - to collapse.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Johnathon E. Briggs and Richard Irwin and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2003
Severe thunderstorms moving rapidly across Maryland last night fired off a bolt of lightning that struck the five-story cupola of a Victorian building housing psychiatric patients at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson, sparking a four-alarm fire. One female patient was reported injured during the evacuation of 51 residents and 10 staff members from the historic brick structure on the 110-acre campus off the 6500 block of N. Charles St. Baltimore County firefighters from as far as Pikesville and Providence fought the blaze for more than an hour but could not save the ornate, 19th- century rooftop section, which collapsed in flames.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
The cupola atop the Towson courthouse was the target of criticism from the moment it was completed in 1856. Judged too tall, the 70-foot octagonal structure was reduced by more than half only seven years later. Now repairs are again being made -- but nothing as drastic as that first refitting. Manolis Painting Co. of Timonium is stripping away layers of lead paint and replacing broken windows on the structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Baltimore County landmark.
NEWS
June 4, 2001
A $700,000 exterior renovation of McDowell Hall, cornerstone of the St. John's College campus, has begun and is expected to last until late August. The building dates to 1742, when construction began on what was to be the home of Maryland Colonial Gov. Thomas Bladen. But the work went unfinished, and the building and 4 surrounding acres were given to St. John's when the college was chartered in 1784. Named for John McDowell, the college's first president, it was until 1837 the lone building on campus - housing classrooms, dormitories and the dining area.
NEWS
June 4, 2001
A $700,000 exterior renovation of McDowell Hall, cornerstone of the St. John's College campus, has begun and is expected to last until late August. The building dates to 1742, when construction began on what was to be the home of Maryland Colonial Gov. Thomas Bladen. But the work went unfinished, and the building and 4 surrounding acres were given to St. John's when the college was chartered in 1784. Named for John McDowell, the college's first president, it was until 1837 the lone building on campus - housing classrooms, dormitories and the dining area.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | May 2, 1991
IT is no secret that the Walters Art Gallery has always had impressive holdings in Asian art. William T. Walters was a voracious collector of such art in the second half of the 19th century, but much of this art remained in storage, from his day to our own, for lack of exhibition space. With the opening Sunday of Hackerman House, the new museum of Asian art at the Walters, we can all finally get a look at what has been uncrated.Until recently, the Walters had a mere 125 pieces of Asian art on display in a section of the 1974 museum annex.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
Saved from possible destruction, a 19th-century cupola that used to grace the top of a Baltimore cabinet company building finally will get a new home -- as an Inner Harbor ice cream stand.The Maryland Stadium Authority will be glad to be rid of the 1-ton structure, which has been sitting for seven months in a Camden Yards parking lot while the Ravens stadium goes up. The Baltimore Museum of Industry, soon to become the cupola's owner if everything goes as planned, is happy to have it.And People Encouraging People Inc., a nonprofit organization that hopes to turn the 13-foot-wide, 20-foot-high dome into an ice cream business, can't wait to start using it, with the museum's permission.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1997
A 19th-century cupola that survived more than 100 years atop a piano factory near Camden Yards and was nearly lost to the construction of Oriole Park may now be scrapped to make way for the football stadium.The cupola was built for the sprawling Knabe Brothers Piano Co., which opened in 1869. The piano factory was later converted into an ice cream cone factory for Maryland Cup Corp., and was torn down in 1989 to make way for parking south of Oriole Park.The cupola was moved in 1989 to the roof of Herbert Greenbaum & Associates cabinet company, where it was a familiar sight for motorists on Interstate 395.The Greenbaum building was purchased and demolished this year to make way for stadium parking.
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