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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Under Armour CEO and founder Kevin Plank and celebrity judges will pick from six finalists Friday in the annual Cupid's Cup national entrepreneurship competition. The annual competition, designed to foster interest in student entrepreneurship, is chaired by Plank in partnership with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. It's open to undergraduate and graduate-level students at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as recent graduates.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Every day companies mine online data to track consumer habits, but two University of Maryland law professors say Facebook and dating service OkCupid went too far by manipulating their users' experience to study their behavior. At the professors' urging, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler agreed to review this week whether the companies' actions are akin to patients being pulled into medical research without their knowledge. Federal law requires participants' consent and independent oversight of such experiments, and a state law broadened those regulations.
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SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
For years, Meg Rowe has been a periodic patient at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center, awaiting test results and undergoing procedures. But on Feb. 15, she plans to run a mile through the bitter cold - happily and in her underwear. "I figure, I've been through chemo[therapy], and I've been through radiation treatments," said Rowe, who in her early childhood was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis, a rare genetic disorder that affects her nervous system and can cause malignant tumors.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Under Armour founder Kevin Plank was so impressed with Friday's winner of the nationwide entrepreneur competition he runs with the University of Maryland, he offered the graduate student $25,000 in exchange for a stake in his company. Disease Diagnostic Group founder John Lewandowski walked away with $105,000 in total from the Cupid's Cup Business Competition - $75,000 in first place winnings, $5,000 as the audience favorite and the sweetener from Plank. Carrie Handwerker, a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, said Plank arranged for the equity stake to be held by his Cupid Foundation.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 17, 1990
He has thought of everything. The ring. The fireside table at the Milton Inn. The tokens of his affection, including slinky, sapphire-blue lingerie. But Bob (as we'll call him so as not to spoil the surprise) figures his crowning moment will come Christmas Eve when his girlfriend opens a certain brightly wrapped box and finds several smaller boxes, each featuring a gift tag with one hand-written word.Together, the tags spell out something he's been too afraid to say: I-LOVE-YOU-WILL-YOU-MARRY-ME?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRTITC | September 26, 1998
Jeremy Piven ("Ellen") plays a guy in modern-day Chicago who claims to be Cupid, god of love. He says he got temporarily bounced from Olympus and needs to put 100 couples together in the Windy City before he can get back in.Paula Marshall ("Spin City") plays the lady shrink who is called in to check him out. She thinks he's a nutcase, but she's kind of attracted to him -- you know, the way Maddie was attracted to the nutcase named David on "Moonlighting."Give ABC credit: this is not your standard sitcom premise.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
Valentine's Day has many drawbacks. It is too commercial. It makes single people feel bad. It promotes the wearing of red, unflattering to some complexions. And then there's Cupid.Cupid -- mythological son of Venus, winged archer of love, chubby naked infant, take your parenthetical pick -- is no Santa Claus. Santa Claus is an easily recognizable fat man with a white beard and a red suit. As befits the Christmas season, he is generous and warmly dressed. People don't hesitate to climb onto his lap and share their intimate wishes.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
1867: SCHOOL FOR `COLORED PEOPLE' On Oct. 26, 1867, Joseph Peaker and several trustees of the Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church arranged to build "a school for the colored people of Havre de Grace." The Anderson Institute was built on Stokes Street on land that Peaker inherited from his father, Cupid Peaker, and sold to the trustees. Though the institute no longer stands, the Hosanna School remained in its place for many years. Cupid Peaker and his sons Joseph and James were at the forefront of the struggle for equality in Harford County.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | April 25, 1993
Q. I have a 23-by-25-inch rectangular scarf from the Hollan America steamship line. Its red background is decorated in black and white with an ocean liner in an oval in the center surrounded by a heraldic emblem, an American eagle with flags, and the words, "New Twinscrew Steamers 12500 Tons." The names of various European and American cities appear in its corners and along the sides. Is it worth much?A. The Holland America Line produced at least two variations of its popular souvenir cotton scarves around the turn of this century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
Gordon, by Edith Templeton. Pantheon. 240 pages. $22. It is both a jolt and a reprieve to read the 1960s erotic novel Gordon and leave behind the wisecracking lonely women of so-called chick lit, with their oh-so-normal weirdnesses and cute neuroses, for the sterner depravities of Edith Templeton's characters. The girls of the guides and diaries put up a fair show of worldly ways, but in the end their cynical shells tend to crack and reveal a marshmallow core. They're lambs in wolves' clothing compared to Templeton's hungry souls.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Under Armour CEO and founder Kevin Plank and celebrity judges will pick from six finalists Friday in the annual Cupid's Cup national entrepreneurship competition. The annual competition, designed to foster interest in student entrepreneurship, is chaired by Plank in partnership with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. It's open to undergraduate and graduate-level students at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as recent graduates.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
For years, Meg Rowe has been a periodic patient at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center, awaiting test results and undergoing procedures. But on Feb. 15, she plans to run a mile through the bitter cold - happily and in her underwear. "I figure, I've been through chemo[therapy], and I've been through radiation treatments," said Rowe, who in her early childhood was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis, a rare genetic disorder that affects her nervous system and can cause malignant tumors.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Looking for that perfect Valentine? Or maybe you and your true four-legged love are looking to share the snuggles this year. Either way, Columbia's Camp Bow Wow is gearing up for its fifth annual Cupids and Canines event to be held Feb. 9 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Enchanted Forest Shopping Center, Ellicott City. More than a dozen animal-rescue organizations from the mid-Atlantic region will be on-site that day to help match up orphaned dogs with their human soulmates and send them to their forever homes.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
The five start-up companies that competed for thousands of dollars in prize money Friday at the University of Maryland, College Park couldn't have been more different. But as the founders gave their sales pitches to a panel of judges and an audience of students and potential investors, they all had one thing in common: They had to impress Kevin Plank, founder and chief executive of Under Armour Inc., and a judge and key sponsor of the Cupid's Cup business competition. "We want big ideas.
NEWS
March 19, 2010
Judges are required to make all sorts of decisions from the bench, many of which have life-altering consequences for the parties before them. But rarely are judges tempted to play the role of Cupid in domestic disputes. That crosses a line where jurists should fear to tread. Yet Baltimore County Judge G. Darrell Russell Jr. apparently felt no compunction about wading into matters of the heart where his court had no business. Confronted with a domestic violence case in which the alleged perpetrator sought to evade conviction by marrying his victim, the judge was only too happy to oblige.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
1867: SCHOOL FOR `COLORED PEOPLE' On Oct. 26, 1867, Joseph Peaker and several trustees of the Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church arranged to build "a school for the colored people of Havre de Grace." The Anderson Institute was built on Stokes Street on land that Peaker inherited from his father, Cupid Peaker, and sold to the trustees. Though the institute no longer stands, the Hosanna School remained in its place for many years. Cupid Peaker and his sons Joseph and James were at the forefront of the struggle for equality in Harford County.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | November 20, 1994
Q : I have two framed pictures of a little girl with a bow and arrow. She is awake in one picture and sleeping in the other. Each measures 13 by 19 inches, and each is signed "M. B. Parkinson." What can you tell me about my pictures?A: These photos are known as "Cupid Awake" and "Cupid Asleep." Over 50 million prints of the original photos were produced in the early 1900s by the Ohio Art Co. M. B. Parkinson was the original photographer and Josephine Anderson was the model. Photos signed by Parkinson are more valuable than the prints.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
Flowers and candy might cut it the rest of the year, but not this week -- no way. Valentines frown on generic gift-giving. Time to pull all the stops, show some flair, really wow 'em. You've got three days left, lovebirds. Better get a move on it, especially if you're Internet shopping. Every day counts when trying to avoid those overnight shipping fees. Here are a few ideas to get you going: Love powder Avoid mincing words. Let her know how you feel in a compact way -- literally. Three face-powder compacts by Terry are stamped with sentiments ("I t You," "Kiss" and "Love")
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 3, 2003
After scouring catalogs and online purveyors of fine goods, our astute trend spotters have come to two conclusions: This holiday season, scarlet is the new black and, perhaps more shockingly, the moose is the new reindeer. Don't be confused by the fact that the two animals both have antlers. Moose are easily distinguished by their longer snouts and their general lack of sleekness. Much the same way as you would tell the difference between your Great-aunt Martha and a Victoria's Secret model.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
Gordon, by Edith Templeton. Pantheon. 240 pages. $22. It is both a jolt and a reprieve to read the 1960s erotic novel Gordon and leave behind the wisecracking lonely women of so-called chick lit, with their oh-so-normal weirdnesses and cute neuroses, for the sterner depravities of Edith Templeton's characters. The girls of the guides and diaries put up a fair show of worldly ways, but in the end their cynical shells tend to crack and reveal a marshmallow core. They're lambs in wolves' clothing compared to Templeton's hungry souls.
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