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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 14, 1995
Say this for "The Indian in the Cupboard": The movie plays it straight. It's really about an Indian in a cupboard.If only Steven Spielberg had directed Melissa Mathison's screenplay, as he did for "E.T." the movie might have had the sense of imagination-expanding wonder and glory that film packed. Instead, the screenplay has been entrusted to the literal-minded Frank Oz, who seems to specialize in petty cruelty, as he's displayed in such films as "What About Bob?" and "Dirty Rotten Scandals," and even in the snippy hauteur he brought to Miss Piggy when he was her principal puppeteer.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Scents of savory sausage, freshly cooked pancakes and hot coffee emanated from the church hall at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Rosedale for the annual Shrove Tuesday dinner. Many of the guests donned colorful beads and masks. Like diners at Christian congregations throughout the area, the crowd of about 200 at Prince of Peace dug into steamy stacks, smothered in maple syrup and melting butter — the typical Fat Tuesday meal and the last festive dinner before Lent begins. For many, the modest, calorie-laden supper means Mardi Gras more than any celebration with parades and parties.
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NEWS
By JUDITH B. ROSENFELD SISTER WATER By Nancy Willard Knopf 255 pages; $21 and JUDITH B. ROSENFELD SISTER WATER By Nancy Willard Knopf 255 pages; $21,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 1993
THE MYSTERYOF THE CUPBOARDLynne BanksMorrow, 246 pages; $13.95; 12 and up This fourth book in the "Indian in the Cupboard" series is about Omri, the youngest son in his family. His mother and father are there when they are needed in his life or in the story, but generally, he manages to be private about his comings and goings. The cupboard -- an earlier birthday gift -- has been wrapped and carefully placed in the bank for safe-keeping.When Omri opens the cupboard with a special key, small plastic "people" come alive.
NEWS
November 22, 2009
The economic downturn that has caused millions of Americans to lose their jobs, homes and sense of financial well-being has also produced a drastic increase in the number of people who go to bed hungry at night. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported last week that nearly 50 million Americans - including almost a quarter of the nation's children - lacked consistent access to enough to eat in 2008. That was the highest figure recorded since the department began keeping such statistics in 1995.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 14, 2006
Call me the crank of Charles Village, but when the Baltimore Marathon undermines my normal Saturday walking routine, I get grouchy. The runners cross through my neighborhood not once but twice, and they cut off the streets where I normally pass. Last year, I was doing errands with a friend, and we had to take the Jones Falls Expressway downtown and cross under the Howard Street Bridge just to reach Hampden and get home again. And it's not just the marathon.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | March 18, 2007
Shake off your red-checkered curtains and bring in Le Corbusier chairs. Country is going modern. Not that it hasn't been a tad modern all along. Old gas station signs have always been a kissing cousin to pop art. And Shaker interiors are as pure and clean-lined as anything dreamed up by the Bauhaus, the German art school that so influenced modern design. But the point being made by the authors of a new book, Modern Country (Gibbs Smith, $34.95), is that it's a good idea to marry country and contemporary pieces.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
You know the scene all too well: The door of your refrigerator is open and there you stand, peering into its depths. There's food in there, of course. You've got some beets, some chocolate sauce, Parmesan cheese, some milk, some butter, pickles, mayonnaise, capers left over from a party recipe, carrots beginning to grow hair.Minutes pass as you stare at the food -- a blank and somewhat worried look on your face -- while you wish that somehow things would magically rearrange themselves into the ingredients for a meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | July 14, 1995
A young boy meets a small, magical creature that becomes the greatest friend he ever had.Yes, that's the synopsis for "E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial," the highest-grossing movie ever made. But it's also a good thumbnail description of "The Indian in the Cupboard," the film adaptation of Lynne Reid Banks' award-winning children's book, opening today.Both pictures were scripted by Melissa Mathison. She would rather no comparisons were made between them at all."Basically, I was working against elements that were comparable to 'E.T.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 18, 1999
IT MADE NO SENSE. It was totally impractical. It was one of those rare occurrences, a few hours of spontaneous fun. The other night, on a whim, my 14-year-old son and I set up the model train in the living room.The living room floor is not the recommended spot to put a train. If you put a train track on the floor, there is a good chance someone will trip over it. Threading the tracks through the furniture can be problematic.A better spot would have been down in the basement, on top of the long, flat ping-pong table.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
Suddenly, the cupboard at Maryland's Department of Transportation is bare. Changes in driving habits since the Persian Gulf crisis and the onslaught of the economic recession have sent revenues tumbling. DOT now finds itself with a projected deficit of $205 million over the next 18 months and $521 million over the next six years. A gas-tax increase seems inevitable.What might have been the most appealing option -- delaying all road and transit projects until revenues rebound -- is out of the question.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | March 18, 2007
Shake off your red-checkered curtains and bring in Le Corbusier chairs. Country is going modern. Not that it hasn't been a tad modern all along. Old gas station signs have always been a kissing cousin to pop art. And Shaker interiors are as pure and clean-lined as anything dreamed up by the Bauhaus, the German art school that so influenced modern design. But the point being made by the authors of a new book, Modern Country (Gibbs Smith, $34.95), is that it's a good idea to marry country and contemporary pieces.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 14, 2006
Call me the crank of Charles Village, but when the Baltimore Marathon undermines my normal Saturday walking routine, I get grouchy. The runners cross through my neighborhood not once but twice, and they cut off the streets where I normally pass. Last year, I was doing errands with a friend, and we had to take the Jones Falls Expressway downtown and cross under the Howard Street Bridge just to reach Hampden and get home again. And it's not just the marathon.
SPORTS
By GARY LAMBRECHT and GARY LAMBRECHT,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Virginia senior defenseman Michael Culver had just concluded his last great day's work as a collegiate lacrosse player by doing the improbable in the NCAA championship game. For the first time in 35 games, Massachusetts senior attackman Sean Morris came up empty as a goal scorer, largely because of the way Culver denied him the ball and shut down any chance for Morris to get into shooting position. One first-team All-American having his way with the other. Culver said it was up to him and other seniors to lead the way, to finish off a perfect 17-0 season - the best in Division I history - and to deliver Virginia its third NCAA crown under 14th-year coach Dom Starsia, and the fourth in school history.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Alyson Nachman's boys couldn't wait for the man in the green and white grocery truck to pull up to their Owings Mills house - and neither could she. Among the first in the Baltimore area to order her groceries over the Internet from a company called Peapod by Giant, Nachman stood by as the driver brought red peppers, milk and other everyday supplies to her kitchen counter. Instead of tearing through the aisles of a local Giant, sons Jason, 4, and Alex, 2, quietly ogled the truck and the neat green totes full of groceries.
NEWS
May 6, 2001
TWENTY-TWO years ago, Bill Ewing was deep in the doldrums. His first marriage had ended, and the former banker and schoolteacher desperately needed a purpose. Mr. Ewing, now 58, found his calling in hunger. From his misery came not only direction in his life but also a mission to reduce the misery quotient among Maryland's homeless and hungry. His work began when a friend, civic activist Peggy Waxter, told him about an operation to collect food for shelters, pantries and soup kitchens.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 18, 1999
IT MADE NO SENSE. It was totally impractical. It was one of those rare occurrences, a few hours of spontaneous fun. The other night, on a whim, my 14-year-old son and I set up the model train in the living room.The living room floor is not the recommended spot to put a train. If you put a train track on the floor, there is a good chance someone will trip over it. Threading the tracks through the furniture can be problematic.A better spot would have been down in the basement, on top of the long, flat ping-pong table.
NEWS
February 2, 1991
Charles L. Benton, who is Gov. William Donald Schaefer's long-time fiscal wizard, had to pull just about every rabbit out of his magical hat to balance this year's financial blueprint. Plunging revenues, rising costs for mandated programs and a "no new taxes" mood forced him to jerry-rig a budget that is precariously balanced with bubble gum and bailing wire. The $11.6 billion state budget unveiled yesterday calls for overall growth of a mere 1 percent -- the smallest increase in 46 years.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
Yvonne Brown has come so far -- from sunken-cheeked addict to teacher's assistant, from drawing government checks to making her own money and her own way.Yet there she was, leaning over the counter of the food pantry at the Bethel Outreach Center in West Baltimore this week, waiting as emergency services director Georgia Crawford filled plastic bags with frozen salmon and peanut butter, dried milk and canned corn, spaghetti and bread."
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