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By Don Markus and Don Markus,FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. women's national soccer team, one of the legitimate contenders for a gold medal at this summer's Olympic Games, will make its only area appearance today when it meets China at RFK Stadium.The noon game, which will be televised live on ESPN, is part of the six-game, four-country U.S. Women's Cup competition. Japan and Canada will play in the first game of today's doubleheader, beginning at 9: 30 a.m.The U.S. team, which finished third in last year's World Cup competition, is 14-1-1 this year, including Women's Cup shutout victories this week over Japan (6-0)
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Under Armour CEO and founder Kevin Plank and celebrity judges will pick from six finalists Friday in the annual Cupid's Cup national entrepreneurship competition. The annual competition, designed to foster interest in student entrepreneurship, is chaired by Plank in partnership with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. It's open to undergraduate and graduate-level students at U.S. colleges and universities, as well as recent graduates.
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NEWS
September 5, 1997
Harriet Browne, 65, a tap dancer who toured with Cab Calloway in the 1950s and later danced with the Silverbelles, died Monday in New York after a long illness.Kaaren Erickson, 44, a soprano who sang at the Metropolitan Opera, died Saturday in Maryville, Tenn., after a two-year battle with cancer.James Wear Walker, 90, the uncle of President George Bush and son of the founder of golf's Walker Cup, died Saturday in Hobe Sound, Fla. An avid golfer, he was the son of George Herbert Walker, the founder of the Walker Cup competition, an international tournament for amateur golfers.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli | May 12, 2010
Humility is part of NASCAR team owner Rick Hendrick's demeanor, at least outwardly. He leaves hyperbole to everybody else who talks about him and his team. They use it liberally. Hendrick, though, is quick to credit other teams and the job they have done. He talks about "being competitive" rather than being on top and repeated that sentiment to reporters Tuesday in Charlotte at the opening of NASCAR's Hall of Fame. "The problem is you have things that are out of your control," Hendrick said.
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY | February 22, 2006
Curling JOHN SHUSTER TV: CNBC, 5-8 p.m. -- John Shuster is one of three members of coach Bob Fenson's curling club in Bemidji, Minn., who are here competing for the U.S. team. Fenson is the coach, and his son, Pete, is the skip. It's obviously a good combination. After finishing eighth four years ago in Salt Lake City, the United States has a chance for a medal here, playing Canada in today's semifinals. Shuster, 23, is the team's lead. He decided to stop playing basketball when he was 14 and needed a new sport, so curling was it. Virtually his entire family plays at home in Duluth, Minn.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
Here's more evidence that in major sports, winning isn't the most important thing, it's the only thing. Dennis Conner will go down in yacht racing history as the only skipper to lose the America's Cup twice. No matter that he is also the only one to win it three times (plus a fourth at the helm). He's a loser, beaten at his own game by many of his old tactics -- and by a much nicer bunch of guys.New Zealand's triumph in what many regard as the crowning event in world-class sailing may prove another turning point in the America's Cup's 144-year history.
NEWS
February 3, 1992
You can tell the men from the boys, they say, by the cost of their toys. Some of the most expensive toys in the world are on display these days off San Diego, competing for the America's Cup. Once the sailing trophy of the elite, the cup competition is now open to anyone -- anyone with tens of millions of dollars to blow, that is.There are essentially two kinds of sailors, those who cruise for the pleasure of it and those who find greater satisfaction in...
NEWS
May 6, 1995
Somehow the America's Cup competition always boils down to being about Dennis Conner.Whether you think Mr. Conner is the obnoxious Ty Cobb of sailing, as one commentator put it, or the loveable Babe Ruth of the sport, as a rival described him, the best-known U.S. skipper is front and center once again as the 29th contest for the most cherished trophy in sailboat match racing begins today.Twice in the competition to defend the cup against foreign challengers, Mr. Conner was counted out. His Stars & Stripes lost out to two other U.S. boats in the semi-finals, but in a back-room deal he was permitted to compete in the finals with a handicap.
SPORTS
By Jaime Diaz and Jaime Diaz,New York Times News Service | September 28, 1991
KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. -- A resolute U.S. team jumped out to a quick lead yesterday morning, and then, contradicting recent history, held on to the lead yesterday afternoon to hold a 4 1/2 -points-to-3 1/2 edge over Europe after the first day of the 29th Ryder Cup.In team match play, the United States was led by Raymond Floyd and Fred Couples, who won both of their matches. In the second, they handed Europe's star team, Nick Faldo and Ian Woosnam, its second defeat of the day.It was the first time since 1985 that the United States ended the first of three days of cup competition in the lead.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
UNDOUBTEDLY, Luciano Pavarotti will sing again. But his last-minute withdrawal from Saturday's appearance at the Metropolitan Opera trumpets the inevitable: The long reign of the "King of the high C's" is over. The Met's general manager, Joseph Volpe, certainly understood the significance of the moment. "This is a hell of a way to end a beautiful career," he reportedly told the tenor, who had flip-flopped for hours about whether to sing. Was Mr. Pavarotti truly too ill to sing before 3,000 spectators, some of whom had paid $1,500 for their tickets?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
Baltimore has made the list of 18 potential host cities should the United States win the rights to soccer's World Cup in 2018 or 2022. The USA Bid Committee, which has been evaluating facilities around the country, said Tuesday that two Maryland sports facilities, M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore and FedEx Field in Landover, will be included in its bid of stadium sites for a future FIFA World Cup. Baltimore will compete with cities such as...
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,Special To The Sun | December 20, 2006
George Farber spent several minutes wading through a cluster of happy parents and spectators at Soccerdome II in Harmans Friday night. The coach of the Fort Meade indoor soccer team in the under-11 girls second division league received a number of compliments, shook hands and talked for several minutes, laughing and joking along the way. Fort Meade had suffered a tough 3-2 loss to the first-place Lady Red Devils, but not many parents or fans of the...
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 27, 2006
In the aftermath of Europe's one-sided victory in the Ryder Cup, there is only one logical explanation for the collapse of American golf hegemony: We let them win. Sure, you could chalk the whole thing up to the seemingly obvious factors, like the fantastic teamwork of the European players or that tabloid spoof about American golf wives that totally psyched out Tiger Woods, but it can't be that simple. There's just no way that an American team could lose that badly unless there was some greater geopolitical strategy at work.
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY | February 22, 2006
Curling JOHN SHUSTER TV: CNBC, 5-8 p.m. -- John Shuster is one of three members of coach Bob Fenson's curling club in Bemidji, Minn., who are here competing for the U.S. team. Fenson is the coach, and his son, Pete, is the skip. It's obviously a good combination. After finishing eighth four years ago in Salt Lake City, the United States has a chance for a medal here, playing Canada in today's semifinals. Shuster, 23, is the team's lead. He decided to stop playing basketball when he was 14 and needed a new sport, so curling was it. Virtually his entire family plays at home in Duluth, Minn.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
The competition at the International Federation of Women's Lacrosse Associations World Cup hasn't exactly been nail-bitingly close during the first three days. The average margin of victory through the first 11 games was 12.5 goals. The closest? Two games decided by seven goals. That figures to change today, especially with the marquee game of the five-day pool-play round - the four-time defending champion United States vs. Australia at 2 p.m. at the Naval Academy's sold-out Glenn Warner Soccer Facility.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE | November 16, 2003
Last weekend, Matt Kenseth did what no one else with Roush Racing has been able to do in team owner Jack Roush's 16 years in Winston Cup competition - win the series championship. Roush is joyful, but it's apparent he is still not ready to totally embrace the trophy. "It ranks in the top five," he said this week. And then he went on to recall the first championship he won in 1973 in drag racing, his first win in the 24 Hours of Daytona, his first Winston Cup win with Mark Martin in Rockingham, N.C., in 1989, and his last win with Martin in the 2002 Coca-Cola 600 in Charlotte, N.C. "I don't know which of those I'd rank as the highest," said Roush, whose teams have won more than 30 titles in various forms of motor racing.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1994
Sarah LeBrun Ingram has her priorities in order. It seems as though it always has been that way for the Baltimore native.Whatever drew her attention -- family, horses, golf, academics -- there was a focus on the interest at hand.That's why this week is so important to her. She is a repeat selection for the United States in the 28th Curtis Cup competition. The matches will be played today and tomorrow at The Honors Course outside Chattanooga, Tenn.Ingram, bothered by a muscle spasm in her neck and left shoulder, was bypassed for this morning's singles matches.
SPORTS
October 25, 1991
Kings release injury-prone SampsonThe Sacramento Kings bought out the remaining two years on Ralph Sampson's $2 million per year contract yesterday, releasing the injury-prone center to become a free agent.Sampson, 31, described his two years with the Kings as "very difficult." During that time, the former All-Star played only 51 games. Last season, he played in a career-low 25 games and started four.He said he hoped to join another NBA team as a player or coach.The Kings acquired Sampson in September 1989 from the Golden State Warriors for forward-center Jim Petersen.
NEWS
May 15, 2002
UNDOUBTEDLY, Luciano Pavarotti will sing again. But his last-minute withdrawal from Saturday's appearance at the Metropolitan Opera trumpets the inevitable: The long reign of the "King of the high C's" is over. The Met's general manager, Joseph Volpe, certainly understood the significance of the moment. "This is a hell of a way to end a beautiful career," he reportedly told the tenor, who had flip-flopped for hours about whether to sing. Was Mr. Pavarotti truly too ill to sing before 3,000 spectators, some of whom had paid $1,500 for their tickets?
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