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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
The thought of killing his mother had been building inside Jason Aaron DeLong for years before he and his girlfriend of one week took knives to his mother's Westminster apartment and plunged them into his mother and her boyfriend, a prosecutor said yesterday.During opening statements before a nine-woman, three-man Carroll Circuit Court jury, Baltimore Assistant State's Attorney Timothy J. Doory called Mr. DeLong a "cunning" thief and criminal who decided, along with "the purple-haired girl of his dreams," to kill Cathryn Brace Farrar and George William Wahl so they could steal her car and money.
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NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Daddy, I wanna punch Clare." Dave Alexander - who is standing in a large meadow inside Greenbelt National Park, eyes fixed on the topographical map he's holding - wisely ignores that pronouncement made by daughter Mairead, age 7. Daddy employs a diversionary tactic to get the girl's mind off her 5-year-old sister and back on the business at hand. "Is anybody gonna look at the map with me?" he cheerfully asks. Alexander is taking the lead on a dual-family outing. He and his wife, Rachel, and their two children, along with friends Bob Candey and Amy Hansen and their two young boys, are a team entry in a recent Sunday afternoon race organized by Quantico Orienteering Club.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 23, 1998
Leos Janacek was a composer who left a lot to the listener's imagination. All he tells us at the end of his "The Cunning Little Vixen," for example, is that the Forester, the main character, "lets his gun slip from his hands."In his lifetime, the composer steadfastly refused to let his interpreters make more of that conclusion than he thought they should, including suggestions that the Forester has joined the Vixen in death. The composer wanted to leave what happens to the imagination. He concluded "The Cunning Little Vixen" with some of the most powerful music ever composed for an opera's close -- music that suggests the inexorability of nature from generation to generation.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
A bunch of whiz kids from South Carroll High School built a better mousetrap-powered car; now they're beating a path to Laurel. With a Rube Goldberg minicar sporting wheels of gray weather stripping, the team of South Carroll ninth-graders edged out groups from five other high schools to win the county championship and a spot at the Maryland Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement contest this month. South Carroll earned a top-three finish in five of six categories among the six high schools that competed in the MESA county contest Friday at Westminster High School.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1998
Leos Janacek's "The Cunning Little Vixen" is often called a children's opera.It's a fairy tale set in a forest in which animals talk and understand the language of humans. The opera, which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre Nov. 19-22, is charming, funny and simple enough for a child to follow. A baby vixen is captured by a gamekeeper; she grows up and, after killing the forester's chickens, escapes to the forest, where she meets and marries a handsome fox. Though she eventually dies, she leaves behind a brood of fox cubs, including a cunning little vixen.
NEWS
December 5, 2002
IN THIS cynical age, it seems an appropriate bit of scientific revisionism that the latest studies of the age-old partnership of man and his so-called best friend cast humankind as saps played for all they're worth by cunning dogs. The recent genetic and behavioral studies, published in the journal Science, essentially find that instead of the man-dog symbiosis arising out of man taming stray wolves, it was they who sought to mooch off us. It was their move, not ours. It all started with a few clever scavengers who figured out it was worth putting up with us in exchange for our easy pickings.
NEWS
November 30, 1996
I was more than a trifle disturbed by the Nov. 16 editorial ''The Army's challenge.'' On the surface, your editorial sounds fair; as if you are addressing both sides of this issue in a just manner. But on the deeper level, your suggestions are insidious.You have said that female army recruits might report imagined harassment just to avenge the ''brutish training'' dished out by them by drill instructors.That's all we need -- military officials thinking the way you do and providing themselves with the perfect loophole to investigate only the most egregious crimes reing the less serious allegations.
NEWS
By Russell Baker and Russell Baker,New York Times | June 20, 1991
THE ASSOCIATED Press reports that a man known only as Rashid, who looked like Stalin, died the other day at age 92 in Krasnodar. So closely did Rashid resemble the Soviet dictator, the Associated Press reports, that he was employed to sit in for Stalin at meetings and banquets.I knew Rashid slightly, and rather liked him, for despite his astounding resemblance to the murderous dictator one could not help noticing that he was decidedly timid.I once discussed this with him. It was at the Potsdam conference, where Stalin met with President Truman and Prime Minister Attlee in 1945.
NEWS
By HAL PIPER | June 11, 1994
My mother wonders if the extraordinary media event that D-Day became on its 50th anniversary might promote a glorification of war as the solution to our problems -- in North Korea, say, or Haiti.It's a good question. I think the D-Day celebration was something healthier than that, but perhaps that merely reflects my recent reading.One of the pleasures of having teen-agers in the house is revisiting our school days, without the distracting anguish of worrying about our complexions, our social standing or the opposite sex. My 9th-grader read some wonderful books this year, and she was kind enough to want to share them with me. So during these D-Day days I have been reading about older wars -- World War I (''All Quiet on the Western Front'')
SPORTS
By Robert Seltzer and Robert Seltzer,Knight-Ridder | January 17, 1992
He was not an actor, but he generated more drama than a troupe of Broadway stars.He was not a magician, but his hands were so fast that slow-motion cameras sometimes failed to pick up his punches.He was not a politician, but he could be more elo-quent and impassioned than those who were.And although it seems impossible, Muhammad Ali, the man who captivated both the sports world and the "real" world with his skill, wit and grace, turns 50 today.Fifty.Some fans may remember him as the athlete of towering skills who made some of his bouts look as easy as shadow-boxing sessions.
NEWS
December 5, 2002
IN THIS cynical age, it seems an appropriate bit of scientific revisionism that the latest studies of the age-old partnership of man and his so-called best friend cast humankind as saps played for all they're worth by cunning dogs. The recent genetic and behavioral studies, published in the journal Science, essentially find that instead of the man-dog symbiosis arising out of man taming stray wolves, it was they who sought to mooch off us. It was their move, not ours. It all started with a few clever scavengers who figured out it was worth putting up with us in exchange for our easy pickings.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 14, 2002
Nine Queens neatly meets the twin demands of any con-man caper. It keeps us amused as a scam unfolds and leaves us satisfied when its secrets are revealed. The chief players here are Ricardo Darin as a practiced street hustler and Gaston Pauls as the son of another con man. Because he needs a ton of dough fast to help out his dad, Pauls joins up with Darin and swiftly becomes part of a scheme that could net the pair $450,000: selling some rare old German postage stamps known as the "Nine Queens" to a shady financial wizard and philatelist who is about to be deported.
TOPIC
By STORY BY DOUGLAS BIRCH | July 9, 2000
ILIFI, Kenya -- It's a calamity occurring in slow-motion, something that many see happening but no one is sure how to stop. Here in Africa, where AIDS and tuberculosis rage, doctors are witnessing another health catastrophe in the making, a surge in fatal cases of malaria. The reason? The rise of resistance to anti-malarial drugs. First came the collapse of chloroquine -- one of the wonder drugs of the 20th century -- as a reliable treatment. Now health officials are turning to their second line of defense, a drug called Fansidar.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
He scurried beneath the pines to hide from the police chopper and its infrared eye. He climbed a tree to evade the bloodhounds. Once, he draped his camouflaged body with twigs and leaves, lying motionless as an all-terrain search vehicle nearly ran him over. Another time, he all but laughed at how easy it would have been to gun down a line of sitting-duck police officers. These were a fugitive's tales, an account of Joseph C. Palczynski's 10 days on the lam. They were the experiences claimed by a wanted man who seemed both lucky and cunning.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 23, 1998
Leos Janacek was a composer who left a lot to the listener's imagination. All he tells us at the end of his "The Cunning Little Vixen," for example, is that the Forester, the main character, "lets his gun slip from his hands."In his lifetime, the composer steadfastly refused to let his interpreters make more of that conclusion than he thought they should, including suggestions that the Forester has joined the Vixen in death. The composer wanted to leave what happens to the imagination. He concluded "The Cunning Little Vixen" with some of the most powerful music ever composed for an opera's close -- music that suggests the inexorability of nature from generation to generation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1998
Leos Janacek's "The Cunning Little Vixen" is often called a children's opera.It's a fairy tale set in a forest in which animals talk and understand the language of humans. The opera, which will be performed by Peabody Opera Theatre Nov. 19-22, is charming, funny and simple enough for a child to follow. A baby vixen is captured by a gamekeeper; she grows up and, after killing the forester's chickens, escapes to the forest, where she meets and marries a handsome fox. Though she eventually dies, she leaves behind a brood of fox cubs, including a cunning little vixen.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
Larry Flynt is the primordial man you hate to love, and the case for his canonization is pretty tricky, if a case at all. The best thing about "The People Vs. Larry Flynt" is that nobody bothers to make it very hard.The movie is instead a bright purple polyester celebration of the oozing vulgarity, the corpulent greed, the sick, out-of-control ego of that infected bedsore on the butt of the body politick that is Flynt himself, founder of Hustler magazine and its wall-to-wall, full-color gyno-vision school of publishing.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Daddy, I wanna punch Clare." Dave Alexander - who is standing in a large meadow inside Greenbelt National Park, eyes fixed on the topographical map he's holding - wisely ignores that pronouncement made by daughter Mairead, age 7. Daddy employs a diversionary tactic to get the girl's mind off her 5-year-old sister and back on the business at hand. "Is anybody gonna look at the map with me?" he cheerfully asks. Alexander is taking the lead on a dual-family outing. He and his wife, Rachel, and their two children, along with friends Bob Candey and Amy Hansen and their two young boys, are a team entry in a recent Sunday afternoon race organized by Quantico Orienteering Club.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Ian Johnson and Robert Benjamin and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 1997
BEIJING -- Deng Xiaoping, who dramatically transformed China while brutally maintaining Communist political supremacy, died yesterday. He was 92.The death of the resilient former guerrilla fighter -- twice purged from power before becoming paramount leader of the world's most populous nation in 1978 -- was announced by Xinhua, China's state news agency.Xinhua said Deng died of complications from Parkinson's disease and a lung infection. He had been hospitalized since last week and had been sick for years.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
Larry Flynt is the primordial man you hate to love, and the case for his canonization is pretty tricky, if a case at all. The best thing about "The People Vs. Larry Flynt" is that nobody bothers to make it very hard.The movie is instead a bright purple polyester celebration of the oozing vulgarity, the corpulent greed, the sick, out-of-control ego of that infected bedsore on the butt of the body politick that is Flynt himself, founder of Hustler magazine and its wall-to-wall, full-color gyno-vision school of publishing.
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