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By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 28, 1996
LONDON -- When Peter Ward, the former chief executive of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd., took over last June at Cunard Line Ltd., a passenger cruise line company, he may have felt a sense of deja vu.He again found himself at the helm of an unprofitable company with a brand name and flagship product that were far from the assets they once were.At Rolls in the early 1990s, Ward is credited with having fashioned a profitable car company from a tarnished world-class brand that was losing money and its reputation, and had failed to move with the times.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 28, 1996
LONDON -- When Peter Ward, the former chief executive of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd., took over last June at Cunard Line Ltd., a passenger cruise line company, he may have felt a sense of deja vu.He again found himself at the helm of an unprofitable company with a brand name and flagship product that were far from the assets they once were.At Rolls in the early 1990s, Ward is credited with having fashioned a profitable car company from a tarnished world-class brand that was losing money and its reputation, and had failed to move with the times.
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TRAVEL
September 28, 2008
Best large-ship cruise lines and best small-ship cruise lines 1 Crystal Cruises (Large) Silversea Cruises (Small) 2 Regent Seven Seas Cruises Sea Dream Yacht Club Cruises 3 Disney Cruise Line The Yachts of Seabourn 4 Oceania Cruises Grand Circle Small Ship Cruises 5 Cunard Line Lindblad Expeditions 6 Celebrity Cruises Windstar Cruises 7 Holland America Line Viking River Cruises 8 Princess Cruises Uniworld Boutique River Cruise Collection...
TRAVEL
By Tricia Eller | December 5, 1999
Whether looking for glitz, glamour and gluttony or subdued sophistication, travelers on today's vast ocean cruisers sail aboard virtually self-contained cities.Once the only mode of ocean-hopping, liners gradually developed from cattle-like herding to floating vacation. When the emerging airlines outpaced and nearly outdated cruise ships, the passenger liner industry had to find a new draw -- opulence.The creators of the Titanic grasped the concept of opulence with both hands, although the ship's ill-fated maiden voyage of 1912 showed just how uncivilized the sea could be. More than 1,500 died in the dark waters, but we continued our love affair with the sea undaunted.
NEWS
July 1, 2004
Margaret K. Ramsberg, a retired elementary school educator and guidance counselor who was an avid trans-Atlantic ship traveler, died of Alzheimer's disease Sunday at the Wesley Home in Mount Washington. She was 98. Born Margaret Kyle in Baltimore and raised in the city's Pimlico section, she was a 1924 graduate of Western High School. She attended what was then Western Maryland College on a scholarship and earned a degree in education in 1928. That year, Mrs. Ramsberg began teaching French and English in Vienna, Dorchester County.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 1997
I was told that cruise lines are interested in older men to serve as "gentlemen in waiting." I've just turned 65 and have a lot of time on my hands.In an effort to balance out the preponderance of women on some cruises and to provide dance partners, at least nine ship lines provide hosts, who also socialize at meals and to pitch in with some chores.Most lines recruit through Lauretta Blake, the Working Vacation, 610 Pine Grove Court, New Lenox, Ill. 60431; (815) 485-8307, fax (815) 485-7142.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | April 23, 2000
Theme cruises have always been around as a sort of off-season incentive to travel, but today they are becoming main attractions. "There's a cruise out there for everyone," says Karen Bohning, spokeswoman for Cruise Lines International Association, a trade group representing 25 of the top lines. "If you want to go on a Star Trek cruise," she says, "you can find one." Cunard Line alone has 33 theme cruises from which to choose, including "Big Bands at Sea," a trans-Atlantic voyage featuring the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, and a six-day "Great Authors of the Century" sail from New York to Southampton with Frank McCourt, author of the best-selling "Angela's Ashes."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
Constance Gilchrist Edwards, 99, a retired art needlework instructor, died Thursday in her sleep at Keswick Multi-Care Center.Mrs. Edwards, who lived all her life in Baltimore, was a knitter who made hundreds of sweaters and afghans for family and friends. In the 1950s, she taught the craft in the art needlework department of Hutzler's store in Towson.She grew up on Mount Royal Terrace north of North Avenue and attended the Bryn Mawr School before graduating from the New School in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 8, 1995
Dr. William Kroger, 89, a pioneer and longtime champion of the medical uses of hypnosis, died Monday in Los Angeles. He specialized in obstetrics, gynecology and endocrinology until he became intrigued by the psychosomatic causes of many illnesses he encountered. His interest led him to become a psychiatrist and to use hypnosis to deal with the psychological components of many disorders, particularly the pain of childbirth.At a time when hypnosis was regarded as little more than a potentially dangerous parlor trick, his writings and demonstrations gradually won the confidence of the medical establishment.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
For those who love the sea and its great ships, this book serves as a reminder that the era of the great Trans-Atlantic liners will finally draw to a close when the Queen Elizabeth 2 -- known commonly as the QE2 -- finally sails on its last voyage to the breakers' yard.The ship is descended from a grand pantheon of Cunarders with a pedigree so hallowed on the Great Circle Route that the years have not washed away their memory.The Mauretania, Lusitania, Aquitania, Berengaria, and the superliners Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth -- legendary predecessors on the North Atlantic route -- figure mightily in the QE2's heritage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 14, 2009
Margie Herskovitz, a retired railroad worker who was also an astrologer and water aerobics instructor, died Feb. 7 of complications from cancer at a Las Vegas hospice. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 83. Born Margolia Levine in Pittsburgh, she moved to Baltimore to marry Irwin M. Herskovitz, who owned a dry cleaning business. Mrs. Herskovitz had been an administrator at the Randallstown Convalescent Center and also worked for the Chessie System, later CSX, in downtown Baltimore.
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