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NEWS
April 18, 1994
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said in an opinion of the Supreme Court last year that voting rights cases involving "the propriety of race-based [efforts] designed to benefit members of historically disadvantaged racial minority groups" are among "the most complex and sensitive" courts have to resolve. Things just got more complex and sensitive: U.S. District Court Judge Joseph H. Young ruled last week that Worcester County must use the cumulative voting method to benefit blacks in county commission elections.
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NEWS
By Samuel Issacharoff and Richard H. Pildes | November 20, 1996
THE DECADE-OLD federal policy of clustering blacks and whites into racially designed districts led this fall to a bitter public spectacle. New court decisions forced several black congressional representatives to run in majority-white districts. In the end they were re-elected, but not before much concern that they might lose their seats.But as this drama played itself out, the South is also experimenting with another, less public solution to the problem of deep-seated racial and political division.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | September 18, 1994
EASTON -- Worcester County residents waiting to conduct a County Commission election that has been delayed by a legal battle over voting rights will have to wait longer.An opinion released late Friday by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., agreed with a ruling by a lower court judge that Worcester's traditional election system was unlawful.But the three-member panel ordered the matter resolved at the county level. The jurists rejected a lower court judge's imposition this summer of a new, controversial voting system, but declined to suggest what kind of system should be used.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court ordered Worcester County yesterday to hold a county commission election this fall using a redistricting plan that probably will mean a black candidate will win a seat there for the first time.The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., refused to give the county more time to draw up new districts for the board. Instead, it adopted one of the plans put forward by black voters in the county.In a key part of the ruling, the appeals court cast aside a plan drafted by Senior U.S. District Judge Joseph H. Young of Baltimore.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1994
Yesterday's Q&A column with Saunders Marshall Jr., a Worcester County voting-rights activist, was incorrectly accompanied by a photograph of Honiss W. Kane Jr., a Pocomoke City town councilman and colleague of Mr. Marshall's. Mr. Marshall's photo is shown here.The Sun regrets the errors.POCOMOKE CITY -- Saunders Marshall Jr. was 8 and living in Worcester County in 1933 when a mob of angry whites stormed a jail in neighboring Somerset County and lynched a black man from a tree."The main thing I remember about that is we were told to stay off the streets," he says.
NEWS
By Samuel Issacharoff and Richard H. Pildes | November 20, 1996
THE DECADE-OLD federal policy of clustering blacks and whites into racially designed districts led this fall to a bitter public spectacle. New court decisions forced several black congressional representatives to run in majority-white districts. In the end they were re-elected, but not before much concern that they might lose their seats.But as this drama played itself out, the South is also experimenting with another, less public solution to the problem of deep-seated racial and political division.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | August 6, 1994
SNOW HILL -- Worcester County voters will join other Marylanders at the polls this fall, but candidates for the county's highest political office -- commissioner -- will be missing from the local ballots.In a surprise ruling announced yesterday in a landmark voting-rights case for the Eastern Shore county, three 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges ordered an indefinite delay in the election of the five-member county commission.While the appellate judges' ruling gives them more time to consider both sides of the suit, it leaves Worcester's aspirants for county commissioner wondering what -- if anything -- they can do next.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | April 7, 1994
EASTON -- Plaintiffs in a Worcester County voting-rights suit said yesterday they will celebrate a federal judge's unusual order that would allow voters to cast more than one vote for the same county commission candidate on Election Day.Challengers to the county's system of voting for county commissioners said the order by U.S. District Senior Judge Joseph H. Young marks the death of the county's at-large election system."
NEWS
By William T. Coleman Jr | June 7, 1993
THE Lani Guinier affair gave those who know her a sense of Kafkaesque unreality.Her experience, character, respect for the law and balanced approach to the issues would have made her one of the finest assistant attorneys general ever to serve our country. She is superbly qualified, mainstream and pro-integrationist in the tradition of Thurgood Marshall.President Clinton's withdrawal of her name last Thursday not only was unfair; it was an example of political cowardice.Those intimately familiar with the history of racial discrimination in this country and with recent cases under the Voting Rights Act understand all too well the problems that Ms. Guinier addresses in her scholarly writings, which explore possible court remedies for the worst instances of racial discrimination in the political process.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1994
EASTON -- Minority citizens fighting to change Worcester County's way of electing commissioners are telling a federal judge that they still want new districts drawn that would all but guarantee election of the county's first black commissioner.Plaintiffs in the voting-rights case, which has gone on for nearly two years, made the assertion in answering a move earlier this month by the commissioners to retain the status quo.As a result, the stage is set for arguing the case a second time in federal court in Baltimore starting Dec. 2 -- a fight that eventually could end up with an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
Lani Guinier just wants to talk about it.Yes, the woman most famous for the job she didn't get unwittingly keeps paraphrasing the advertising slogan made famous by local attorney Stephen L. Miles as she moves through her appearances yesterday at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.In fact, she is so eager for dialogue that she misreads the sign instructing her to speak directly into the microphone for a question-and-answer session with honors students."It says, 'Please talk into mike,' " she notes.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1995
Worcester County is being told by a federal judge in Baltimore to adopt a new, hybrid method of electing commissioners that would apply one set of rules to primary elections and a different set to general elections.Such a variant on traditional voting systems for local government would be unique in Maryland, at least.U.S. District Senior Judge Joseph H. Young's new order is the latest development in a 2-year-old voting-rights fight to determine how Worcester countians will elect commissioners.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1994
EASTON -- Minority citizens fighting to change Worcester County's way of electing commissioners are telling a federal judge that they still want new districts drawn that would all but guarantee election of the county's first black commissioner.Plaintiffs in the voting-rights case, which has gone on for nearly two years, made the assertion in answering a move earlier this month by the commissioners to retain the status quo.As a result, the stage is set for arguing the case a second time in federal court in Baltimore starting Dec. 2 -- a fight that eventually could end up with an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | October 2, 1994
SNOW HILL -- Civil rights activists from around the state who rallied here yesterday warned Worcester County officials to change the way top officeholders are elected or face political and economic reprisals.Almost two years after seven Worcester blacks filed a lawsuit to get rid of the county's at-large election system, the costly legal battle continues despite two rulings from federal judges that white voters have an unfair advantage over minority voters.About 150 marchers vented their frustration yesterday with the county's five-member commission, which has spent more than $400,000 in legal fees to keep its election system intact.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | September 18, 1994
EASTON -- Worcester County residents waiting to conduct a County Commission election that has been delayed by a legal battle over voting rights will have to wait longer.An opinion released late Friday by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., agreed with a ruling by a lower court judge that Worcester's traditional election system was unlawful.But the three-member panel ordered the matter resolved at the county level. The jurists rejected a lower court judge's imposition this summer of a new, controversial voting system, but declined to suggest what kind of system should be used.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | August 6, 1994
SNOW HILL -- Worcester County voters will join other Marylanders at the polls this fall, but candidates for the county's highest political office -- commissioner -- will be missing from the local ballots.In a surprise ruling announced yesterday in a landmark voting-rights case for the Eastern Shore county, three 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges ordered an indefinite delay in the election of the five-member county commission.While the appellate judges' ruling gives them more time to consider both sides of the suit, it leaves Worcester's aspirants for county commissioner wondering what -- if anything -- they can do next.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1995
Worcester County is being told by a federal judge in Baltimore to adopt a new, hybrid method of electing commissioners that would apply one set of rules to primary elections and a different set to general elections.Such a variant on traditional voting systems for local government would be unique in Maryland, at least.U.S. District Senior Judge Joseph H. Young's new order is the latest development in a 2-year-old voting-rights fight to determine how Worcester countians will elect commissioners.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court ordered Worcester County yesterday to hold a county commission election this fall using a redistricting plan that probably will mean a black candidate will win a seat there for the first time.The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., refused to give the county more time to draw up new districts for the board. Instead, it adopted one of the plans put forward by black voters in the county.In a key part of the ruling, the appeals court cast aside a plan drafted by Senior U.S. District Judge Joseph H. Young of Baltimore.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1994
Yesterday's Q&A column with Saunders Marshall Jr., a Worcester County voting-rights activist, was incorrectly accompanied by a photograph of Honiss W. Kane Jr., a Pocomoke City town councilman and colleague of Mr. Marshall's. Mr. Marshall's photo is shown here.The Sun regrets the errors.POCOMOKE CITY -- Saunders Marshall Jr. was 8 and living in Worcester County in 1933 when a mob of angry whites stormed a jail in neighboring Somerset County and lynched a black man from a tree."The main thing I remember about that is we were told to stay off the streets," he says.
NEWS
April 18, 1994
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said in an opinion of the Supreme Court last year that voting rights cases involving "the propriety of race-based [efforts] designed to benefit members of historically disadvantaged racial minority groups" are among "the most complex and sensitive" courts have to resolve. Things just got more complex and sensitive: U.S. District Court Judge Joseph H. Young ruled last week that Worcester County must use the cumulative voting method to benefit blacks in county commission elections.
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