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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A shipment of Indian cumin seed contaminated with the larvae of a dead Khapra beetle, an invasive insect, never made it to McCormick & Co.'s Hunt Valley facility and was to be sent back to India, the spice maker said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered the larvae and other seed contaminants during a search of the shipment at the port of Baltimore on April 17. The next day, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed that the insect was a Khapra beetle, considered one of the most destructive pests, damaging grain, cereals and stored food.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A shipment of Indian cumin seed contaminated with the larvae of a dead Khapra beetle, an invasive insect, never made it to McCormick & Co.'s Hunt Valley facility and was to be sent back to India, the spice maker said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered the larvae and other seed contaminants during a search of the shipment at the port of Baltimore on April 17. The next day, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed that the insect was a Khapra beetle, considered one of the most destructive pests, damaging grain, cereals and stored food.
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FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 19, 1998
More than any other time of the year, in the summer months I entertain spontaneously. I think nothing of telephoning friends in the afternoon to invite them for a last-minute supper that evening. This past week, for example, when neighbors called in the morning to ask if we would like to see a new film one night, I impulsively asked them to have a light supper at our house afterward.Obviously, the menu for this as well as my other hastily conceived meals has to be simple. I offered bowls of black and green olives along with creamy goat cheese sprinkled with herbs as post-cinema appetizers.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
It's supposedly good for you to eat pork or cabbage or black-eyed peas at New Year's, and for my last post of the year I offer you this recipe for “caviar” made with black-eyed peas. It's a variant of a recipe for the 1970s in a Time-Life book that The Sun published in 2000. It has been quite serviceable for the holiday in our house. Here are a couple of things to consider. Dried black-eyed peas are better than canned, because you can have more control over whether they get mushy.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
One cold evening last month, my husband and I had a quick weeknight meal at a small bistro where I ordered pan-sauteed pork tenderloin served with cumin-scented potatoes. The little garnish of diced potatoes cooked with onions and seasoned with cumin seeds was so good that I would have killed for seconds. When I asked our waitress to tell me how the latter had been prepared, she willingly gave some guidelines. That simple dish stayed in my mind for several days, and this past week when it came time to plan a dinner party menu in honor of a house guest, I was determined to re-create the cumin-scented spuds.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | October 24, 2004
When planning a menu for a company dinner, I usually select the main course first then think about the side dishes. But sometimes it works the other way around, and an accompaniment becomes inspiration for a meal. In a quandary over what to serve at a casual supper for friends, I was exploring my files in search of ideas when I came across a recipe for honey-glazed carrots seasoned with cumin and orange. I created the recipe last winter after tasting a similar version in Paris, but I had tucked my notes away and forgotten them.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 3, 2001
As a cook, I love the transition from the cold of one season to the warmth of the next because it demands a change in my style of cooking and entertaining. In my outdoor "kitchen," juicy steaks, lightly charred chops and ribs brushed with piquant barbecue sauce are grilled over hot embers. They replace my cold-weather menu anchors of roasted chickens, braised beef stews and baked casseroles. I like the casual ambience and the leisurely pace of backyard cooking and dining, too. For our first grill meal I plan to try a dish created by my good friend and talented cook, Jim Budros.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | August 28, 1994
Cumin smells like old socks. Yet what would chili be without cumin -- or curry or sausages or pickles or Edam cheese? The predominant scent in most curry powders and chili powders is cumin.Cumin is the yellowish-brown, dried fruit of a small plant in the parsley family that is native to the Upper Nile.A lot of experts say cumin tastes like caraway but that makes me wonder what's wrong with their taste buds. To me cumin tastes earthy, pungent, even a little bitter. The seeds of cumin do look something like caraway seeds -- at least they are both small and oval.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 31, 1998
Now that warm weather has arrived for good, my husband and I have opened our sun porch (which is shut during the winter months) and have spent the last several weeks relaxing and eating there. Opening our sun porch is always a signal to me that it is time to change to a more casual style of entertaining.This past weekend, for example, we invited friends from Paris, who were visiting their son at college, for wine and hors d'oeuvres on our porch. I baked Cumin Pepper Crisps, a new recipe in my files, for the occasion.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 2008
Sometimes inspiration for a new dish springs from odd places. This one started with some leftover cumin-salt mixture. That's right; not with the meat or a vegetable, but just with a seasoning. Then I thought about the dried pear slices picked up at the farmers' market and how they would cook up nicely with some caramelized onions. And what would go with those flavors, but some chicken? I served it on a bed of greens, but you could have the salad separately if you prefer. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 8, 2011
Most of us so-called grown-ups are just like the kids. As much as we moan about going back to school, we're pretty much over our free-form summer hours and want to get back to some sort of routine. One of the things we look forward to is seeing friends and family we've missed during the hot months due to varying vacation schedules. A dinner party is a fun way to catch up. But just because we're getting back to our routines doesn't mean our festive moments have to be the same old same old. Ergo, our culinary exercise du mois is to fix a dinner for eight that's a bit on the exotic side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 13, 2011
Jay Cohen's Turkey-Black Bean Chili Makes: 20 servings 6 pounds ground turkey 2 yellow onions, diced 1 red pepper, diced 2 tablespoons minced garlic 2 cans crushed or diced tomatoes, 28 ounces each 2 cans plum tomatoes, 28 ounces each 1 can black beans, 16.5 ounces, drained 2 tablespoons ground cumin 1 tablespoon chipotle chili powder 4 bay leaves Salt and pepper to taste...
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 28, 2009
My 30-something son is a self-professed football fanatic, who at any given moment can reel off the latest rankings of teams all over the country. Imagine his excitement as the Super Bowl approaches. This year, as in many past, I've sent him a recipe for some wonderful appetizers to serve during halftime. These cumin-scented shrimp and chorizo skewers are simple to assemble, yet packed with robust flavor. The rosy crustaceans, the sienna-tinted chorizo and the crimson tomatoes combine to make a striking trio of colors, and the hearty taste of each melds together perfectly.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 2008
Sometimes inspiration for a new dish springs from odd places. This one started with some leftover cumin-salt mixture. That's right; not with the meat or a vegetable, but just with a seasoning. Then I thought about the dried pear slices picked up at the farmers' market and how they would cook up nicely with some caramelized onions. And what would go with those flavors, but some chicken? I served it on a bed of greens, but you could have the salad separately if you prefer. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
The Raw 50 By Carol Alt, with David Roth I Am Grateful: Recipes & Lifestyle of Cafe Gratitude By Terces Engelhart, with Orchid North Atlantic / 2007 / $24.95 The first cookbook from Cafe Gratitude, a group of San Francisco Bay Area restaurants, is vegan - the recipes use no animal products - and gets more into spirituality than Carol Alt's book. The recipes have names like "I Am Honoring Nachos" and "I Am Releasing Flax Crackers." But the book offers practical advice about equipment and technique, including a way to use your oven as a dehydrator.
NEWS
By RENEE ENNA | August 23, 2006
Rubs can rub a lazy cook the right way. There usually are ample ingredients in the pantry (after all, how much ground red pepper or cumin can a person go through in a decade?) and they add plenty of zip to meat and seafood. Here we're adding a rub to quick-cooking steak kebabs. You can tailor the rub to accommodate your heat quotient; use less of the chili and ground red pepper (or none at all) if you prefer a tamer kebab. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 13, 2011
Jay Cohen's Turkey-Black Bean Chili Makes: 20 servings 6 pounds ground turkey 2 yellow onions, diced 1 red pepper, diced 2 tablespoons minced garlic 2 cans crushed or diced tomatoes, 28 ounces each 2 cans plum tomatoes, 28 ounces each 1 can black beans, 16.5 ounces, drained 2 tablespoons ground cumin 1 tablespoon chipotle chili powder 4 bay leaves Salt and pepper to taste...
NEWS
By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
The Raw 50 By Carol Alt, with David Roth I Am Grateful: Recipes & Lifestyle of Cafe Gratitude By Terces Engelhart, with Orchid North Atlantic / 2007 / $24.95 The first cookbook from Cafe Gratitude, a group of San Francisco Bay Area restaurants, is vegan - the recipes use no animal products - and gets more into spirituality than Carol Alt's book. The recipes have names like "I Am Honoring Nachos" and "I Am Releasing Flax Crackers." But the book offers practical advice about equipment and technique, including a way to use your oven as a dehydrator.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 29, 2006
Several months ago, while dining at a seafood restaurant in midtown Manhattan, I ordered a first-course crab and avocado salad and was stunned by the simple ingenuity of the dish. Typically, crab salad is mixed with mayonnaise and rarely includes a spicy accent, but this version was bound with creme fraiche and seasoned with cumin. For entertaining, I love traditional recipes that have been reinterpreted with bright new tastes, and this dish certainly falls into that category. Using creme fraiche (the thick French cream that is a cross between heavy cream and sour cream)
NEWS
By JOE GRAY. | April 26, 2006
When a bag of kale showed up on the doorstep, courtesy of our neighbors departing on an unexpected trip, it raised the age-old question: What to do? What to do? Somehow Asian flavors came to mind, a departure in our house where almost everything has a Mediterranean influence. With ginger root and a few other flavorings, this dish quickly came together. Pork chops were in the fridge, so they became the protein - but chicken would be a delicious substitute. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe and analysis.
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