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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- John A. Miller IV, described by prosecutors as a "highly motivated predator" who lured a Carroll County girl to her death, was convicted yesterday of murder and sexual assault, setting the stage for a death penalty hearing next week. Miller, 27, was found guilty of first-degree murder, a first-degree sexual offense, robbery and false imprisonment in the strangling of 17-year-old Shen D. Poehlman in Reisterstown in July 1998. The defense had conceded that Miller killed the girl but had fought the sexual-assault and robbery allegations, knowing that prosecutors needed those convictions to pursue the death penalty.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
Timothy Cumberland may not have fired the blast that killed a 22-year-old Westminster man after a drug deal went bad near midnight Jan. 28, 1993. But Carroll County jurors decided yesterday that he was as culpable as his two friends, who pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the death of Gregory Lamont Howard two years ago.After nearly eight hours of deliberation, the jury of 10 men and two women convicted Cumberland -- who was facing the charges for...
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2004
CSX Corp., the largest railroad east of the Mississippi, is closing its engineer school in Cumberland and consolidating its training operations in Atlanta as the company prepares to hire thousands of new workers to meet demand for rail transportation. The loss will fall heaviest on Cumberland's hospitality industry, which benefited by selling rooms and meals to the roughly 300 trainees that filtered through the school annually, economic development officials said. It also will affect nine staff members, consisting of one administrator and eight contract trainers.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
CUMBERLAND -- In the foothills of the mountains rising alongside the mighty Potomac River, pioneering giants of American transportation once converged.Mule-drawn boats loaded with coal plied the waters of America's first canal. Steam engines chugged their way up the hills on the rails of America's first passenger lines. Stagecoaches, carriages and, eventually, cars made their way west on America's first national road.Now, this Western Maryland city of 25,000 is staking its future on re-creating the past, hoping to lure droves of tourists to relive its rich heritage as a hub of westward expansion.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
KNOWN AS THE "Queen City," Cumberland once was a bustling mountain town of 38,000, the hub of westward expansion, first by way of the National Road, then the C&O Canal and finally the railroads. Industries flourished. Laborers flocked to town for the jobs. Tourists and businessmen kept hotels and resorts prosperous.No longer.Cumberland is a skid-row dowager with empty storefronts and long-vacant industrial plants. The jobs are gone and the town's isolation has discouraged new companies from coming.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
Arthur H. Bremer, who shot and paralyzed former Alabama Gov. George Wallace in 1972, is living in an apartment in Cumberland as he begins the transition to life in the outside world after 35 years behind prison walls, an Allegany County official said yesterday. "He is in Cumberland. ... It's really not a big deal," said Allegany County Administrator Vance Ishler. In an effort to avoid media attention, Bremer, 57, was released from a state prison in Hagerstown on Friday before dawn. Prison system officials declined to say where he would be living but had previously said they would try to find a place for him in a rural part of Maryland.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has filled the longest judicial vacancy on a district court in Maryland, but not with a friend from the General Assembly who wanted the position. The governor has named H. Jack Price, solicitor for the city of Cumberland since 1990 and a private practice lawyer, to a seat on the Allegany County District Court. Price, 50, fills a vacancy created when Judge Paul J. Stakem announced his retirement in 2004. Price's "experience and ability will serve the best interests of the citizens of Allegany County during his term," Ehrlich said in a statement.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
CUMBERLAND -- Once known for being at the end of a famous canal, this city is ready to open a new pathway, one that civic leaders hope will make it a recreation destination and infuse downtown businesses with cash. Feet - hundreds of thousands of them - are expected to pedal and hike the Great Allegheny Passage, a 150-mile converted railroad corridor that connects here with the C&O Canal Towpath, providing a link between Washington and Pittsburgh. Trail advocates and government officials will celebrate completion of the East Coast's longest rail trail tomorrow with a ribbon-cutting along the banks of the Potomac River, where the trail and the towpath meet.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2007
CUMBERLAND -- Home prices in the Baltimore metro area? Up 5 percent. In the Washington area? Barely budging. In San Diego, Tampa, Las Vegas and several dozen other metros areas? Down, down, down. But in this corner of Appalachia - in this long-struggling, geographically isolated metro area - home prices have just shot up 17 percent. The National Association of Realtors, which calculated the change in median price for single-family homes sold in the first quarter of the year vs. the same period last year, says the Cumberland increase topped all other metro areas in the nation.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2004
CUMBERLAND - Weeds and dandelions sprout through the cracks in the taxiway of this city's tiny airport, where about a dozen planes take off and land on a typical day. Touring the grounds in a golf cart on a recent afternoon, auto race organizer John Felten spied the weeds and laughed. "We'll take care of those," he said. "There won't be any left." They'll be burned off this weekend when Greater Cumberland Regional Airport becomes Cumberland Speedway. Its taxiways will be shut down and turned over to race cars - part of the struggling airport's bid to stay aloft and prove its relevance after losing scheduled air service last year.
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