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By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Thanks to the University of Maryland Medical Center, the people of Allegany County will receive expanded services for trauma and heart cases.By the end of the year, doctors at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center will see patients, speak with physicians and aid with diagnoses through a telecommunications link to Cumberland's Sacred Heart Hospital.Cumberland physicians send many of their worst trauma cases by helicopter to Shock Trauma in Baltimore. With the new equipment, they will be able to confer with the more experienced team of doctors in Baltimore and make better decisions about when to move patients to Shock Trauma.
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NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Just days ago, the Army's 372nd Military Police Company, based near Cumberland, was the source of unabashed pride in the city, the reason yellow ribbons are tacked to tree trunks and fences, and why the Wal-Mart posts pictures of the unit's young soldiers near its doors. That changed somewhat Wednesday when the country found out what Cumberland-area residents had been whispering for weeks - that members of the unit, deployed in Iraq, have been accused of committing crimes against Iraqi prisoners in their custody.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
CUMBERLAND -- Before there were coal mines or trains or tourists, this Western Maryland city was just a fort, a mountain outpost built for war.Now Cumberland -- which has fought everything from French spies to fluoridated water -- has turned on itself. This week, the battle could make Cumberland one of the first communities in the nation to merge two hospitals, then blow them apart.Differences over religion are at the heart of this civil war. One of the hospitals, Sacred Heart, is Catholic, complete with nuns, crucifixes and prohibitions on abortion, birth control and euthanasia.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 2, 2002
NEW GERMANY - Hampered by freezing temperatures, high winds and blowing snow, a search team failed to find a Cumberland man who was missing from a deer-hunting trip early Saturday in a wilderness area of Garrett County. Robert Halley Sr., 65, was reported missing about 12:45 a.m. yesterday by his son, said Heather Lynch, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. "He came home from work and realized his dad was not at home," Lynch said. Halley left his home between 6 a.m. and 6:30 a.m. Saturday to hunt in New Germany State Park, Lynch said.
NEWS
July 3, 1997
AS THE U.S. Surface Transportation Board wades through the 15,000-page, 79-pound application of CSX and Norfolk Southern to take over Conrail, one point is abundantly clear: This business deal provides enormous benefits to Maryland communities.Of primary importance is the entry of a second rail giant into the state that should give CSX a run for its business. Such intense competition can only aid Maryland companies that ship by rail, which should see lower rates, more reliable service to far more destinations and shorter transit times.
TRAVEL
June 30, 2002
Get your kicks on Route 144" may not be catchy enough for a song lyric, but the trip from Baltimore to Cumberland and beyond has a lot to offer people who are happy when the drive is the destination. Following a scenic route that uses mostly Route 144 and Route 40, travelers can retrace the National Road, which was recently named one of the country's 20 All-American Roads by the U.S. Department of Transportation for its historical and scenic value. The government authorized the first federally funded road from Cumberland to Vandalia, Ill., in 1806, and Maryland joined forces with private interests to build an extension from Baltimore to Cumberland around the same time.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
CUMBERLAND -- As dozens protested outside in the pouring rain, leaders of a local hospital voted by secret ballot to continue its 2-year-old merger with a cross-town Roman Catholic rival.Hospital leaders hope this vote -- apparently the final one on the matter -- will heal a bitter feud over possible job losses, cost cutting and Roman Catholic doctrine in the secular Memorial Hospital."We have to stop fighting each other," said Don Alexander, head of the Memorial board of directors after it voted 9-6 to continue the merger.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- Crime, taxes and schools are the usual campaign fodder in municipal elections, but in two Western Maryland cities the burning topic this spring is one long ago settled in most communities without debate: fluoride. Barring a last-minute court ruling, Cumberland voters are to decide May 16 whether to repeal a decade-old ban on putting the cavity-fighting chemical in the city's drinking water. In neighboring Frostburg, candidates for mayor and council are squaring off over the fluoride issue as their June 6 election nears.
NEWS
By JOANNA DAEMMRICH and JOANNA DAEMMRICH,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
CUMBERLAND -- As the 1916 locomotive pulled up, smoke billowing and brass bell clanging, the crowd at the station watched in a kind of solemn wonder. Little boys in Thomas the Tank Engine sneakers stood on tiptoe. So did white-haired men. Rail fans took photos. And Zachary Overfield, 5, tugged at his mother to get a closer look at the full-size steam engine. "He's been dying to ride a real train," said Chandra Overfield of Morgantown, W.Va. For 17 years, this historic coal-fired train has taken tourists on breathtaking trips through the Allegheny Mountains.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1994
CUMBERLAND -- A Virginia developer whose proposal for an Indian-run gambling casino atop a mountain overlooking Cumberland seemed dead only eight weeks ago is resurrecting the idea.The developer, James L. Silvester, abandoned the project less than two weeks after it became public knowledge in October, blaming political opposition, particularly from Del. Casper R. Taylor Jr., a Democrat who represents both Allegany and Washington counties and is speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates.But Mr. Silvester said now that he believes the multimillion-dollar casino plan can overcome such political opposition, although he offered no reason for his renewed optimism.
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