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By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 5, 1991
"I live in the Grand Hotel," jokes Mark Baker, the Cumberland-born actor who plays the dying bookkeeper in the touring company of "Grand Hotel," currently at the Mechanic Theatre.The vivacious, curly-haired actor isn't entirely kidding -- because he's constantly on tour, the hotel he's most familiar with is the one on stage.But there's another reason "Grand Hotel" feels like home; in a sense this tour represents a theatrical homecoming. Four years ago, the 44-year-old Mr. Baker stepped out of the limelight and resettled in Cumberland.
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NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1991
CUMBERLAND -- Tough economic times are not getting in the way of a vision in Cumberland for a proposed two-lane highway and park along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal.Despite the financial climate, a committee of local, state and federal government officials, preservationists and business leaders is forging ahead with plans to study a roadway and park along the canal in this Western Maryland city.It's a project that officials are reluctant to put a price tag on yet, as four proposals are under consideration.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
Arthur H. Bremer, who shot and paralyzed former Alabama Gov. George Wallace in 1972, is living in an apartment in Cumberland as he begins the transition to life in the outside world after 35 years behind prison walls, an Allegany County official said yesterday. "He is in Cumberland. ... It's really not a big deal," said Allegany County Administrator Vance Ishler. In an effort to avoid media attention, Bremer, 57, was released from a state prison in Hagerstown on Friday before dawn. Prison system officials declined to say where he would be living but had previously said they would try to find a place for him in a rural part of Maryland.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | October 6, 1991
CUMBERLAND -- Being the best wasn't good enough to keep Jim Stratton from losing a job.Back in 1974, managers at Pittsburgh Plate Glass, one of Cumberland's industrial ghosts, told workers -- including Mr. Stratton -- that they were among the best around but the plant had to be shut down. This left him without a job after 13 years with the company.Now, at age 47, Mr. Stratton and nearly 150 other Western Marylanders working at the Schmidt Baking Co. plant in Cumberland are getting the same pat on the back, all the way out the door.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
CUMBERLAND -- A special train will take Oriole fans from Cumberland to the Camden Yards stadium four times this summer, a happy Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced yesterday.Mr. Schaefer, a railroad buff and Oriole fan himself, announced the special arrangement outside the Cumberland station of the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad, which runs from Cumberland Frostburg.A Maryland Rail Commuter train will haul up to 500 passengers to Oriole Park at Camden Yards June 28, July 26, Aug. 23 and Sept.
NEWS
June 19, 2001
ENDING the geographic isolation of Maryland's swath of Appalachia is costly but essential. Without solid transportation links to the Baltimore-Washington region, companies are reluctant to locate in Western Maryland's Garrett, Allegany and Washington counties. The completion of the National Freeway (Interstate 68) greatly enhanced east-west connections by car and truck. Now the state is reestablishing airline links to the area's biggest cities, Cumberland and Hagerstown. Thanks to a $2.25 million subsidy, daily flights will resume between those cities and Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2001
For months, calls to this Western Maryland city's airport have been answered with a depressing recorded greeting: "Currently, no airline service is available." The message - in effect, "You can't get there from here" - is exactly what a rebuilding railroad town doesn't need as it seeks to counter its image as a remote outpost and to lure tourists and businesses. But the message is about to change. State-subsidized commuter flights between Cumberland and Baltimore-Washington International Airport, with a stop in Hagerstown, will begin tomorrow.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- Cumberland voters overwhelmingly approved yesterday a bid to lift the city's decade-old ban on fluoridating its water supply, signaling a major shift in Western Maryland's traditional hostility to the widely accepted cavity-fighting chemical. By a vote of 2,525 to 1,633 in unofficial returns, residents opted to repeal a charter provision barring the addition of fluoride or any other "substance" to the city's drinking water. Thirty-three percent of the city's voters cast ballots in the referendum, which was voted on with a general election for mayor and City Council of the economically struggling Allegany County seat.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
Harry Stegmaier Jr. celebrated teen-age birthdays with rides on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad from Cumberland to Grafton, W.Va. -- trips that awed passengers with Potomac River crossings, long tunnels, sharp curves and steep grades up and down the Allegheny Mountains.Nearly 40 years later, Mr. Stegmaier, professor of U.S. military, diplomatic and transportation history at Frostburg State University, relives those "incredible" trips of his youth on once-a-year excursions during Maryland Railfest.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
Thanks to the University of Maryland Medical Center, the people of Allegany County will receive expanded services for trauma and heart cases.By the end of the year, doctors at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center will see patients, speak with physicians and aid with diagnoses through a telecommunications link to Cumberland's Sacred Heart Hospital.Cumberland physicians send many of their worst trauma cases by helicopter to Shock Trauma in Baltimore. With the new equipment, they will be able to confer with the more experienced team of doctors in Baltimore and make better decisions about when to move patients to Shock Trauma.
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