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NEWS
December 5, 2012
It is amusing and ironic that pop singer Adam Levine should be talking about "the decay of Western civilization" (Celebrities, Dec. 4). He is himself an icon of what journalist Carl Bernstein once described as "the idiot culture. " For the first time in our history, the weird, the stupid and the coarse are becoming not just the norm but our cultural ideal. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
If it's true that a society is known by its most popular artifacts, we are becoming a culture of comic books and games. Our biggest film and TV characters are based on comic book super heroes and villains, while our real life heroes are professional athletes. Watching tonight's premiere of “Gotham,” I couldn't help feeling that if there was any new series that would probably crack Nielsen's Top 10 this fall alongside all the different primetime NFL games and pre-game shows, it would be this one from Fox. You tell me if that's a good or bad thing.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, would tell the mayor to remember that everything is connected and that the arts will only thrive if the rest of the city thrives. "As Willy Don [Schaefer] used to say, 'everything is a priority,' " Vikan said. "A healthy city will support the arts." He would like her to champion more cooperation between the arts and Baltimore's green spaces and to encourage bringing more culture into the schools. And, of course, he hopes she'll keep the money coming.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 5, 2012
The late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously remarked that, "The central conservative truth is that it is culture, not politics, that determines the success of a society. The central liberal truth is that politics can change a culture and save it from itself. " I've always liked that quote, but I think it misleads. That two plus two equals four is not a conservative truth or a liberal truth. It's simply the truth. (Moynihan himself recognized this when he even more famously said that people are entitled to their own opinions but not their own facts.)
ENTERTAINMENT
by Jordan Bartel | jordan@bthesite.com and b free daily | March 26, 2010
To quote a certain vice president, this week in entertainment was a big f---ing deal. Here's your pop culture week in review. 'THE HILLS' FINAL SEASON STARTS IN APRIL: It's the last chance to give Heidi and/or Spencer a best leading douchebags in a fake reality show Emmy. ROAD TRIP!: Universal Orlando's The Wizarding World of Harry Potter opens June 18. Just a few months left to convince my editor there's a story down there. 'TODAY' REPORTS ON BEST ACTRESS OSCAR CURSE: It's not that we think you have "journalistic standards," but we sadly expected more from you, "Today."
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Thanks for publishing letter writer Roz Heid's comments, which expresses the opinions held by many of us ( "Obama's disastrous immigration policy," July 10). The U.S. is justly proud of its inclusiveness, and most people want to be hospitable to newcomers. Today's arrivals, however, are from one particular area and represent a special problem since they constitute an extremely large group and therefore are not easily assimilated. They are supported by the fashionable doctrine of multiculturalism, which encourages them to bring their language and culture with them, instead of adopting the language and customs of their new country.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
Teen-age letter-writer Emma Zyriek's take on the "fiscal cliff" negotiations could not have been more to the point ("On eve of fiscal cliff, Congress acts like squabbling children," Dec. 29). It would be a great thing if this letter could be printed in large, bold type and sent to all the politicians in Washington who think they know what is best for the people who put them there. Maybe we should send our high school students to Washington if we want to get anything accomplished.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
Your editorial, "Rampage in Washington" (Sept. 18), was both well-written and absolutely right on. Our culture of violence has, indeed, spawned such horrific acts, culminating in the recent shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, and it is impossible to know where to start answering the inevitable questions. You ask, "Would [Aaron] Alexis have been moved to kill had he not been influenced by the violent video games he is said to have been fascinated by?" You also describe "a culture that celebrates violence and allows so many to become disconnected.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
In the U.S. we are immersed in a culture of fear, especially since the attacks of Sept. 11. The government's bottom line of all policy is national security. As citizens we are to report seemingly peculiar behavior and scary looking individuals. We lock everything that is possible to lock, including our auto tires. Our houses and yards are fortresses. There are "no-trespassing" signs and lights, alarms, gated communities and vigilante patrols everywhere. We distrust anyone who doesn't dress or look like us. Everything and everyone is suspect.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Just when it seemed the situation in Iraq couldn't get any worse, the government moved a step closer to collapsing into chaos on Sunday when its president, Fuad Masum, formally nominated a candidate to replace the country's authoritarian prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, in an effort to break the political paralysis gripping the country since parliamentary elections in April. From there, things went straight downhill. President Masum named Haider Abadi, a member of Mr. Maliki's own Shiite Islamist Dawa Party, as the next prime minister, urging him to forge a broad coalition government to unify the country against Sunni extremists who have taken over large swaths of Iraq in recent weeks and are threatening to march on the capital.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | July 31, 2014
In the next few months, it will be a snap to find entertainment news and venues in Towson thanks to the Towson Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is designing an online application, a one-stop shop of everything you want to know about what's happening, who's doing it and how to get there in downtown Towson. The application, downloadable for smart phones and android devices, will be free to users and to the businesses, chamber members or not, that will be in it. Brooke Bianchetti, assistant to the chamber executive director, is designing the app. "We expect to launch it in the next two to three months," she said of the approximately $10,000 to $12,000 project.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Thanks for publishing letter writer Roz Heid's comments, which expresses the opinions held by many of us ( "Obama's disastrous immigration policy," July 10). The U.S. is justly proud of its inclusiveness, and most people want to be hospitable to newcomers. Today's arrivals, however, are from one particular area and represent a special problem since they constitute an extremely large group and therefore are not easily assimilated. They are supported by the fashionable doctrine of multiculturalism, which encourages them to bring their language and culture with them, instead of adopting the language and customs of their new country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2014
The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance on Friday introduced CultureFly.org, a new site to promote Baltimore-area arts organizations. The site features event, attraction and dining listings, recommendations and discounts. It's scalable to various user devices and uses geolocation and intuitive search functions. "Baltimore has an exciting and growing number of cultural events for residents and visitors alike," executive director Jeannie Howe said in a news release. "As the region's unified voice for the arts and creative community, we wanted to help people navigate through the evolving Baltimore arts scene and discover new cultural experiences.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
For The Atlantic  the distinguished linguist Geoffrey Nunberg has produced an article, "When Slang Becomes a Slur,"  about the controversy over the name of the Washington Redskins.  Don't pass over it without clicking. It is a thoughtful, substantial article that moves from the controversy over the team name to a deeper understanding of the interplay between language and culture. (You'd be better off reading that than this.)  Mr. Nunberg looks at a number of derogatory words that used to be in common use but which over the past half-century have come to be shunned as unacceptable for public discourse, and labeled as such in dictionaries.  Here's a salient paragraph: " That all started to change in the '60s, though it took dictionaries a while to catch up. The sea change in social attitudes that led to the civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965 also transformed the way we talked about race and ethnicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
When the topic is coffee, a debate always seems a split second away. Obsessives argue over beans, equipment and, of course, where to drink it. We all have favorite spots for different reasons. In Hampden, the picturesque Artifact Coffee plays a whimsical foil to the adventurous, no-frills Spro. The Daily Grind in Fells Point can get you in and out quickly. I have never had a bad cup of anything at the relatively new Tribeca Coffee Roasters in Mount Vernon, either, and that is just to name a percentage of the city's viable options.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | December 7, 2011
Let's face it: there's too much new music in a year for any one human being to digest. "2011 Gems" is a December feature on Midnight Sun where I highlight some of the tracks that might have flown under your radar. First up is Jackie Chain's smooth tribute to his Southern rap lifestyle. The song is full of curse words so if that's not your thing, move right along. Jackie Chain, "Parked Outside (feat. Big K.R.I.T. and Bun B)" When I spoke with ST 2 Lettaz of G-Side last month, we talked about Alabama and how everyone has to drive around to get to anything.
NEWS
By Ananya Bhattacharyya | June 3, 2014
As my 9-year-old son and I were enjoying a meal at a Lebanese cafe last month, I overheard a middle aged woman say to the server: "This is my first Memorial Day weekend alone. I'm separated, and the kids are with their dad. " The way in which she wore her heart on her sleeve was touching, as if she thought others might think something was amiss because she was dining alone. It reminded me of my own vulnerability when my marriage broke down several years ago. The server expressed her sympathy.
NEWS
By David Horsey | June 2, 2014
Back in 2000, some unsung network graphics specialist had the bright idea of flipping the traditional association of red with the left and blue with the right. On election night that year, when the newscasters began to report voting results, they turned to big maps with Republican majority states colored Che Guevara red while states that went Democratic were awash in Margaret Thatcher blue. Thus were red states and blue states born, a hue switcheroo that instantly recodified the way Americans perceive themselves and their nation.
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