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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Declaring that Mount Vernon can be a tourist destination second only to the Inner Harbor, nine institutions in the Baltimore neighborhood are banding together to spruce up the area and promote its historic and cultural attractions.The group, calling itself the Mount Vernon Cultural District Committee, is scheduled to announce its plans tomorrow. Its vision begins with more street lighting and signs promoting attractions and grows to include transportation links with the Inner Harbor, sidewalks dotted with cafes and overnight tourist packages complete with admission tickets and hotel discounts.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
When Centennial High School Assistant Principal Joelle Miller arrived at the school three years ago, she got a copy of her students' responses to a countywide survey seeking their view of schools' overall environment for learning. She couldn't believe what she read. Nearly 40 percent of respondents, she said, reported having been teased or bullied for such reasons as hair color or skin color, or were regarded by other students as "not being smart enough. " She and other administrators and faculty at the Ellicott City school vowed to change the school's climate.
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By Kevin B. Kamenetz | June 11, 2000
DOES Baltimore County give its "fair share" of support for cultural institutions based in Baltimore City? This question is playing out on our local political stage and the plot centers on the recent funding flap over the Hippodrome Theater redevelopment project. In Act One, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger, after strong prodding by state legislators, proposed that Baltimore County contribute $1 million dollars over two years toward the ambitious downtown renovation plan.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
Schools and government offices aren't the only things closing down in anticipation of today's snowstorm. Here is a partial list, continually being updated, of cultural and commercial institutions shutting down for the day. The American Visionary Art Museum is closed. Tonight's Hesperus Cine-Concert at An Die Musik Live has been postponed. The Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum and Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards are closed. The Baltimore Museum of Art is closed.
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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
Through all the sounds of harmony -- the bravos ringing in Baltimore's concert halls, the appreciative murmurs coursing through its art galleries and the loud applause echoing in its theaters -- comes a distant but growing dissonance.It's the sound of the younger generation, clicking on the television.The World War II generation that has supported cultural institutions is aging and the baby boomers who follow are not prepared to take over, according to national and local studies, which show that younger audiences prefer watching a performance on television or listening to classical music on compact disc instead of buying a ticket and leaving their living rooms.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2002
NEW YORK -- A major arts complex could arise from the shell of the World Trade Center site. New York City Opera officials have begun discussions with other cultural institutions and with government officials about creating an arts complex as the centerpiece of the rebuilding efforts. They caution that their planning is in its early stages and that they have not made a decision to go forward. But they have attracted interest from the Joyce Theater (the Chelsea-based home of contemporary dance)
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By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
Mount Vernon cultural leaders met yesterday in the first step of a five-year campaign to make the picturesque central Baltimore neighborhood a destination for tourists.Inspired by the runaway success of the Inner Harbor, neighborhood cultural institutions -- including the Walters Art Gallery, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, the Maryland Historical Society, the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Assumption, the Peabody Institute and Center Stage -- joined forces last year to create the Mount Vernon Cultural District.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
The Baltimore Community Foundation will provide $1 million to strengthen arts and cultural programs in Greater Baltimore, it announced yesterday at Center Stage to a gathering of corporate, political, education and arts leaders.The foundation's pledge is based upon the findings of a report on the state of local arts: "Building Community: The Arts & Baltimore Together," which was commissioned from Ernest L. Boyer, president of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.The two-year study looks at how arts and culture invigorate communities through events such as Artscape and institutions such as the Baltimore School for the Arts.
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By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, bowing to pressure from arts patrons throughout the region, has rejected a proposal to phase out city support for Baltimore's art and cultural institutions.Mr. Schmoke and other city officials had received at least 1,500 letters and post cards asking that the city reject a proposal to cut off more than $10 million a year in funding for the museums and other cultural institutions in Baltimore.But Mr. Schmoke said that while the financially strapped city would continue to provide financial support for the arts, it may prove to be inadequate.
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By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, bowing to pressure from arts patrons throughout the region, has rejected a proposal to phase out city support for Baltimore's art and cultural institutions.Mr. Schmoke and other city officials had received at least 1,500 letters and post cards asking that the city reject a proposal to cut off more than $10 million a year in funding for the museums and other cultural institutions in Baltimore.But Mr. Schmoke said that while the financially strapped city would continue to provide financial support for the arts, it may prove to be inadequate.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
Gladys W. Winter, a homemaker and benefactor of several Baltimore cultural institutions, died Wednesday of emphysema at her home on Roland Mews in the Village of Cross Keys. She was 88. Gladys Woolford, the daughter of a banker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating from Roland Park Country School in 1941, she earned a bachelor's degree in three years at Swarthmore College, graduating in 1944. Mrs. Winter — who had a lifelong love and appreciation of music — also was a graduate of the Peabody Conservatory.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Jill Palkovitz, a dressmaker who was described as a "natural designer," died of liver disease Monday at the Long Green Center. The Roland Park resident was 50. Born Marcia Jill Hughes in Midland, Texas, she was a graduate of Stanton High School in Stanton, Texas, and earned a degree at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas. She also attended Texas Tech University at Lubbock, where she studied linguistics, and had a master of arts degree from the Johns Hopkins University. "She was a bit of Texas air in Baltimore City," said Connie Fitzpatrick, a close friend and neighbor.
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Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Free Fall Baltimore , a chance for area residents to sample many of the city's arts and cultural institutions without the need to shell out a dime, will return in October. "People love the chance to be able to sample and experience Baltimore's arts community for free," said Tracy Baskerville, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts (BOPA), which has been putting together the annual event since it started in 2006. "For some people, this might be their one opportunity.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | August 10, 2008
If you think a museum is always a place of quiet contemplation, you weren't at the Baltimore Museum of Art's Annual Meeting and Reception. The decibel level (and the excitement level) in the BMA's Atrium Court resembled something more along the lines of a high-school pep rally. The reason wasn't just the official kickoff of the museum's $65 million philanthropic campaign, but the announcement that $40 million has already been raised. BMA board chair Stiles T. Colwill was walking on air. "This is a huge bonus, not just for the museum, but for Baltimore and the whole region," he said.
NEWS
January 8, 2008
Wrong to pit poor against museums I was dismayed by Daniel Grant's commentary that in essence pits the needs of programs for the poor against the needs of cultural institutions ("Time to rethink tax breaks for charitable giving," Opinion Commentary, Jan 3). As someone who has been a docent at the Walters Art Museum for 19 years, I can attest that there is an ongoing need for every tax break given to what Mr. Grant calls our "culture palaces." The Walters is not a bastion for the rich or for those who wish to be seen as "civic-minded and cultured."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 27, 2007
Bringing back Free Fall Baltimore for a second year, the city and about 85 arts groups are presenting more than 200 free programs throughout October. "You've got everything from the Baltimore Opera to the Kids on the Hill - it's everywhere," says Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, which is coordinating the monthlong celebration of cultural and economic egalitarianism.
NEWS
December 1, 1992
The Baltimore Community Foundation yesterday released "Building Community," a report on the state of the arts in the city written by Ernest L. Boyer, president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and former U.S. commissioner of education. Following are excerpts:BALTIMORE'S pride in the arts is widely apparent. Civic leadership is strong and there is, we found, a shared determination to build a community in which all members are well served -- not just physically, but civically, socially and culturally as well.
FEATURES
October 16, 1994
"Do It Now!" a documentary photographic exhibit on the career of Gov.William Donald Schaefer, opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art today along with the opening of the museum's new wing.The Schaefer exhibit, to be shown in the museum's main building, consists of about 50 photographs documenting Mr. Schaefer's career from 1955 to the present. It covers his four terms as mayor of Baltimore, from 1971 to 1986, and his two terms as governor during the last eight years.Compiled from various sources, including newspapers and photographers, the exhibit covers his entire career -- not just his involvement with the arts.
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