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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | April 29, 1998
Ntozake Shange doesn't look like a cookbook author on a publicity tour.She's wearing tight jeans and a matching denim jacket; pointy-toed, high-heeled, snakeskin cowboy boots; a belt with a huge silver buckle inscribed with the letter S; and more jewelry than you could shake a stick at, including a nose ring.Her gold and brown hair, partially braided, flows around her head and shoulders. Her long nails are neon orange, and in one hand she holds a plastic grocery bag filled with a bottle and four cans of Pepsi.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
" People live on memories of food. " - Pauline Guiragoss The Eastern Shore met the Middle East in East Baltimore recently when a woman from Tilghman Island taught a woman from Lebanon to make Maryland crab soup. It began with a passing comment in The Baltimore Sun's Taste section: "The best crab soup I've ever had is made by … Kelly Belk, who puts a deep tang into her broth with cabbage. " The mention was enough for Beirut native and Canton restaurateur Pauline Guiragoss to ask her friend Belk for a lesson in preparing Chesapeake Bay crab soup the traditional way. "All the recipes I've learned are from my friends," said the well-traveled Guiragoss, 49, who with husband John Curtis owned three restaurants before opening Gitan Bistro Cru at the corner of Fait and South Kenwood avenues.
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NEWS
December 8, 2011
The first immigrants to this hemisphere arrived between 15,000 and 10,000 years ago. As time progressed many unique and advanced cultures developed, particularly in Mesoamerica. Luckily for Baltimore and its environs, the Walters Art Museum will soon open a new special exhibition, "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas," focusing on artifacts from Mesoamerica. The show, which opens Feb. 12, will provide all of us with an opportunity to learn more about the cultural history of our hemisphere, a history that our schools have long neglected.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
The first immigrants to this hemisphere arrived between 15,000 and 10,000 years ago. As time progressed many unique and advanced cultures developed, particularly in Mesoamerica. Luckily for Baltimore and its environs, the Walters Art Museum will soon open a new special exhibition, "Exploring Art of the Ancient Americas," focusing on artifacts from Mesoamerica. The show, which opens Feb. 12, will provide all of us with an opportunity to learn more about the cultural history of our hemisphere, a history that our schools have long neglected.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
The Baltimore County Police Department invited educators and activists to an informal gathering at a Towson restaurant yesterday. The goal was to help make law enforcement careers more attractive to minorities.Black officers make up 11 percent of the 1,635-member department, which serves a county that is about 15 percent black. Hispanic officers make up about 1 percent of the force and Asians account for less than 1 percent.The department needs more minorities and women, but recruiting them is a national problem, said Services Bureau commander Col. M. Kim Ward.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
John Higham, a retired Johns Hopkins University history professor and nationally known authority on American culture, immigration and the historical aspects of ethnicity, died of a cerebral aneurysm Saturday at his North Baltimore apartment. He was 83. Dr. Higham, who was born and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., earned his bachelor's degree in history from the Johns Hopkins University in 1941. During World War II, he served with the Historical Division of the 12th Army Air Forces in Italy. After his 1945 discharge, he served for a year as assistant editor of American Mercury, an intellectual review that had been founded by H.L. Mencken in 1925.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 13, 2001
History comes alive in Sharpsburg this week when Rebels and Yankees march through the town in observance of the 139th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - the Civil War's bloodiest day. Civil War events will be commemorated along the streets and byways of the town and at nearby Antietam National Battlefield. Beginning today and continuing through Monday, activities at the battlefield include lectures, ranger-led hikes and living history events. (Saturday's battlefield torchlight tour is filled)
NEWS
By Allyson M. Poska | October 20, 1994
OVER THE course of nine evenings I sat captivated by Ken Burns' "Baseball" on public television: the triumphs, the defeats, the timelessness of the message, the clash of titans, the home of the brave, and the land of the free. I marveled at how Mr. Burns captured the essence of baseball as a microcosm of our culture.But not really.As a sports fan, I was moderately entertained by the footage of favorite games, and as a music fan, I was amused by the soundtrack. As a cultural historian, however, I was very disappointed at the idea that this was cultural history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | February 14, 1999
"No Go the Bogeyman: Scaring, Lulling, and Making Mock," by Marina Warner. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 435 pages. $35. This reviewer sits down with a pen and a book, "No Go the Bogeyman" by Marina Warner. She will, as is her style, underline every resonant phrase as she reads, every intriguing artifact, every provocative coupling of notion and fact. She will be alert to what is new and what is interesting; she'll quote it back. Such is the stuff of reviews. Book splayed flat, pen in position, the reviewer begins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
" People live on memories of food. " - Pauline Guiragoss The Eastern Shore met the Middle East in East Baltimore recently when a woman from Tilghman Island taught a woman from Lebanon to make Maryland crab soup. It began with a passing comment in The Baltimore Sun's Taste section: "The best crab soup I've ever had is made by … Kelly Belk, who puts a deep tang into her broth with cabbage. " The mention was enough for Beirut native and Canton restaurateur Pauline Guiragoss to ask her friend Belk for a lesson in preparing Chesapeake Bay crab soup the traditional way. "All the recipes I've learned are from my friends," said the well-traveled Guiragoss, 49, who with husband John Curtis owned three restaurants before opening Gitan Bistro Cru at the corner of Fait and South Kenwood avenues.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2008
Kirk Dreier Senior naturalist Oregon Ridge Nature Center, Cockeysville Salary: $60,000 Age: 48 Years on the job : 21 How he got started : With a degree in natural science from West Virginia University, Dreier began his career with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a field ecologist and educator. At the same time, he also worked part time at the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks' Oregon Ridge Nature Center. In 1987, he left the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, and switched to full-time employment at the nature center.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 31, 2008
A 49-year-old Baltimore historian who taught schoolchildren about Billie Holiday and Thurgood Marshall was working on a rowhouse on the city's west side yesterday when he apparently triggered a building collapse that killed him. Alvin Brunson, who in 2005 was named "Best Community Historian" by the Baltimore City Paper, ran the nonprofit Center for Cultural Education at 541 Wilson St., just around the corner from Pennsylvania Avenue, the one-time cultural...
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2004
In one corner of the cottage, 76-year-old Lee DuBois is lying flat on his back underneath a massive wooden "wind chest," cleaning the dirt from a small pipe. Across the room, Sven Larsen, 87, inspects a tangled web of electrical wires from behind his thick, black-rimmed glasses. Every Tuesday, both men, along with at least 10 other members of the Free State Theatre Organ Society, work diligently to restore and reassemble a 1927 Wurlitzer theater organ. Their makeshift workshop, on the campus of Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville, is lined with rows of 6-foot-high stacks of wooden and metal pipes, and has a lingering scent of recently cut plywood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
John Higham, a retired Johns Hopkins University history professor and nationally known authority on American culture, immigration and the historical aspects of ethnicity, died of a cerebral aneurysm Saturday at his North Baltimore apartment. He was 83. Dr. Higham, who was born and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., earned his bachelor's degree in history from the Johns Hopkins University in 1941. During World War II, he served with the Historical Division of the 12th Army Air Forces in Italy. After his 1945 discharge, he served for a year as assistant editor of American Mercury, an intellectual review that had been founded by H.L. Mencken in 1925.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
The home team had the lead in Victory of the Bay of Pigs Stadium, a no-frills concrete hulk in Matanzas, a port city 60 miles east of Havana. On a cool April evening, about 350 fans were watching their provincial baseball team battle rivals from the Isle of Youth, once known as the Isle of Pines, the former site of a notorious prison. Spectators had paid about a nickel to enter the stadium. There were no nachos or Dippin' Dots, just roasted peanuts in paper cones and cocoa- flavored lollipops.
TRAVEL
By Zeke Wigglesworth and Zeke Wigglesworth,KNIGHT RIDDER-TRIBUNE | September 23, 2001
In some circles, you say Tacoma, and they figure you're talking about a Japanese- designed pickup truck. Thousands of people landing at SeaTac International Airport in Tacoma, Wash., right now have no idea what the "Tac" in the airport name is all about. Meaning that Tacoma, the third largest city in Washington (population about 195,000), is another one of those forgotten places that have the misfortune to be situated near an internationally known and gorgeous West Coast playground. Tacoma was primed for great things when it was designated as the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad's transcontinental line in 1873 --- instead of Seattle.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 13, 2001
History comes alive in Sharpsburg this week when Rebels and Yankees march through the town in observance of the 139th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - the Civil War's bloodiest day. Civil War events will be commemorated along the streets and byways of the town and at nearby Antietam National Battlefield. Beginning today and continuing through Monday, activities at the battlefield include lectures, ranger-led hikes and living history events. (Saturday's battlefield torchlight tour is filled)
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2001
Students had all the answers at yesterday's "It's BlackAdemic" contest. Teams representing about 20 Howard County schools met at Oakland Mills High School to showcase their knowledge of African-American history, biography and achievement. Using a quiz show format, "It's BlackAdemic" matched area schools at three levels of competition - elementary, middle and high school. First-place prizes went to Centennial High School and Oakland Mills Middle School. The elementary school teams were made up of pupils from several schools, and each participant received a trophy and a certificate.
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