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By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - In the first and second centuries, Roman emperors walked between the buildings at their summer palace in Rome via a cool, underground tunnel decorated with frescoes of aristocrats, flowers and the winged horse Pegasus. The United States unwittingly acquired the subterranean gallery in a real estate deal in 1931, when the State Department acquired additional grounds for the U.S. Embassy in Rome. The corridor revealed itself during construction of an embassy garage in 1950. These days, American tourists can replace a lost passport and in the same afternoon visit the painted passageway, a dozen feet underground and a few yards away.
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EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
The Department of Planning and Zoning, in conjunction with the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission, is seeking nominations for the 2013 Historic Preservation Awards. As part of this year's annual celebration, the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission will present preservation awards to individuals and organizations whose contributions demonstrate outstanding achievements in historic preservation within Harford County. Awards will be presented in May in recognition of National Historic Preservation Month.
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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
Attending Baltimore's AFRAM festival yesterday proved to be a learning experience for Gloria Shaw."I came just to see different things going on and possibly learn something," the 53-year-old Harrisburg, Pa., resident said. "When were being raised, our parents didn't tell us [about our cultural heritage]."Ms. Shaw is one of thousands of people who attended AFRAM Expo '94, which celebrates the cultural heritage of African-Americans with arts, crafts, food, music and games from around the world.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
When Paul Brachfeld heard about the heist of historic documents in Baltimore this summer, the National Archives inspector general acted quickly. First, he checked his records to see if the suspects - Barry Landau, a well-known collector, and his young friend, Jason Savedoff - had visited his facilities. They had. Next, he reached out to federal investigators and offered the services of his in-house investigative group. The Archival Recovery Team - ART, for short - is now sorting through more than 10,000 items removed from Landau's Manhattan apartment.
FEATURES
By Thomas Maier and Thomas Maier,Newsday | May 29, 1995
New York University professor R.R.R. Smith was walking down Madison Avenue last September, on his way to a cash machine, when he spotted a familiar face.Displayed in the window of the Fortuna Fine Arts Gallery was an ancient marble bust of a young man, an artifact Mr. Smith knew had disappeared from the archaeological dig in Turkey where he had worked the previous summer. Now it was being offered for sale in Manhattan."Let's say I was very surprised," he recalls.Mr. Smith, a professor of classical art and archaeology, contacted Turkish officials.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 31, 2005
When Thurgood Marshall was growing up in Baltimore, his high school principal punished him by sending him to the basement and requiring that he memorize portions of the Constitution. "Before I left that school," Marshall later recalled, according to biographer Juan Williams, "I knew the whole thing by heart." The formative years of Marshall, the first African-American justice on the Supreme Court, would be retold in an interpretive center that may be created to breathe life into another public school Marshall attended, P.S. 103 at 1315 Division St. in Upton.
NEWS
By Carl Honore and Carl Honore,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1994
CUZCO, Peru -- Five centuries after seeing their holiest temples demolished and rebuilt as Catholic churches, the Incas are fighting back.When the Spanish destroyed Incan civilization in the 16th century, they asserted their presence by building on sites worshiped by the Incas. In this wind-swept town, for example, Franciscan monks built the monastery of Santo Domingo on top of Koricancha, or Temple of the Sun, the holiest shrine in an empire that stretched from Colombia to Argentina.But now, the survivors of that Andean culture and their allies are trying to unearth Koricancha -- much to the concern of the church that rests precariously on top.The fight is being closely watched throughout Latin America, as native Americans in this former Inca capital fight to reclaim their buried cultural heritage -- even if it threatens the European culture grafted on top.Symbolic of the changing times is that the Incas have found allies in government and business.
EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
The Department of Planning and Zoning, in conjunction with the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission, is seeking nominations for the 2013 Historic Preservation Awards. As part of this year's annual celebration, the Harford County Historic Preservation Commission will present preservation awards to individuals and organizations whose contributions demonstrate outstanding achievements in historic preservation within Harford County. Awards will be presented in May in recognition of National Historic Preservation Month.
NEWS
By Rev. Robert A. F. Turner | May 10, 1998
IN 1857, Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney, speaking for the majority in the Dred Scott case, wrote, "[Blacks] had no rights which the white man was bound to respect."All of America's people have come on a long and very painful journey of progress since that time. However, for African-Americans, echoes of that past remain as does an unfinished struggle to rescue and reconstruct our history and reaffirm and reclaim aspects of our culture, both in America and on the African continent, that were prohibited, lost and stolen.
NEWS
By Melvin Durai and Melvin Durai,Contributing Writer | April 28, 1993
David Lipsitz was 3 1/2 months old when he left an orphanage in Calcutta, India, to join his adoptive Jewish parents, Gail and Allan Lipsitz of Pikesville. When he was 3, he thought he vaguely remembered something about India, but he wasn't sure.Today, the 6-year-old kindergartner knows much about his native country. A framed flag of India hangs above his bed. More than 20 books on Indian life and folklore fill his shelves. With help from his parents, he has even made a presentation to his class.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
She was born in South Korea, loves her homeland's traditions with a passion and has officially served the burgeoning Korean-American community in Maryland for more than six years now. But Michelle Kim still insists that as a cultural ambassador, she sets something of "a poor example. " Kim, an official with the Korean Society of Maryland, helped organize the 34th Korean Festival in West Friendship on Saturday, an event that drew thousands of people on a brilliantly sunny afternoon.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2007
When Anjali DasSarma's grandmother gave her ankle bells from India, the 8-year-old wanted to know how to dance with them. Her mother, Priya DasSarma of Ellicott City, followed Anjali's lead, switching her from ballet lessons to a class in Indian classical dance. At a recent class, DasSarma watched her daughter dance in a traditional yellow and blue Punjabi costume. She said the class "has been an experience for me also" because DasSarma did not study Indian dance as a child. The DasSarmas are one of many Howard County families using dance to teach their children about their Indian heritage.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Over her 64 years of life, Mervin Savoy has heard both familiar and unfamiliar tales of history, from George Washington's military triumphs to the struggles of her native people, the Piscataway Conoy tribe on Maryland's Western Shore. What she hasn't heard, at least not to her satisfaction, are the twists and turns of history as told by women. Whether in war, politics, business - the events of the day as told in newspapers and books - too often women seemed left out of the story lines.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 31, 2005
When Thurgood Marshall was growing up in Baltimore, his high school principal punished him by sending him to the basement and requiring that he memorize portions of the Constitution. "Before I left that school," Marshall later recalled, according to biographer Juan Williams, "I knew the whole thing by heart." The formative years of Marshall, the first African-American justice on the Supreme Court, would be retold in an interpretive center that may be created to breathe life into another public school Marshall attended, P.S. 103 at 1315 Division St. in Upton.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
Although the drizzling rain fell throughout most of the day in Crownsville, the dreary weather did not dampen the spirits of hundreds who gathered yesterday for the annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival. The first day of the two-day festival drew thousands of people who danced and sang along with gospel music and rhythm and blues and dined on hot dogs, cheese steaks and barbecue sandwiches. The annual festival is held to celebrate black culture and to pay tribute to Kunta Kinte, the slave who was the central figure in the book and film Roots.
TRAVEL
By Martha Stevenson and Martha Stevenson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
Study the past if you would divine the future." So said Confucius, and these days more and more Americans are interested in where they come from. Heritage tourism is gaining momentum. According to a recent study by the Travel Industry Association of America and Smithsonian Magazine, tourists who seek out history and culture (118 million last year, up 13 percent from 1996) spend more, do more and stay longer than other travelers. Interest in African-American history, the civil rights movement, women's rights, Native American culture, the Civil and Revolutionary wars, and the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition are all helping to fuel domestic travel.
NEWS
June 7, 1998
We must stop disrespecting African heritageJames D. Walsh's letter ("Head-wrap article was off the mark," May 24) stated that the Rev. Robert A. F. Turner's May 10 article that provided an 18th-century legal and cultural context for understanding the adverse reaction of some to Shermia Isaacs wearing an African head-wrap at her Howard County school was "interesting, but otherwise irrelevant to the recent controversy."Mr. Walsh seems unable to comprehend that racial and cultural attitudes of 1998 continue to be influenced by the legal system established centuries ago in this nation for the purpose of advancing a claimed Eurocentric cultural supremacy and hegemony over African people.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Over her 64 years of life, Mervin Savoy has heard both familiar and unfamiliar tales of history, from George Washington's military triumphs to the struggles of her native people, the Piscataway Conoy tribe on Maryland's Western Shore. What she hasn't heard, at least not to her satisfaction, are the twists and turns of history as told by women. Whether in war, politics, business - the events of the day as told in newspapers and books - too often women seemed left out of the story lines.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
For local surgical assistant Pankaj Dave, yesterday's India Day festival in Towson was a chance to reconnect with Indian-Americans in the Baltimore area. For city government employee April Harper, the annual event celebrating India's independence gave a her a glimpse of a co-worker's culture. And for 6-year-old Nikita Shah, India Day meant the petite dancer was allowed to wear a swipe or two of glittery eye shadow and mascara. "That's her favorite part," said her mother, Nipa Shah, who was in town from Rockville for the event.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
An 800-foot pillar of red sandstone looms at the east end of Arizona's Canyon de Chelly in the heart of the Navajo Nation. It is called Spider Rock, for Spider Woman, who taught the Navajo to weave, thereby helping to engender one of the most beautiful and sought-after forms of Native American art. Navajo rugs, genuine and knockoff, can be found almost anywhere. But Ann Hedlund, a textile expert for the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona in Tucson, says, "Almost all the best Navajo weaving originates in Arizona and New Mexico."
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