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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
The Rev. Al Sharpton dropped by Baltimore on Monday to seek support for a fledgling plan to create a new arts district in the city to honor African-American cultural achievements. The proposal, by a group calling itself the African-American Arts Cultural & Entertainment Consortium, is still in the preliminary stages. But Sharpton said he supports the development of such a district because it would bolster the self-image of local youths. "This is not just an investment in the business community, it's an investment in the social order," Sharpton told an enthusiastic crowd of about 200 during an early evening rally inside the War Memorial auditorium.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
The Rev. Al Sharpton dropped by Baltimore on Monday to seek support for a fledgling plan to create a new arts district in the city to honor African-American cultural achievements. The proposal, by a group calling itself the African-American Arts Cultural & Entertainment Consortium, is still in the preliminary stages. But Sharpton said he supports the development of such a district because it would bolster the self-image of local youths. "This is not just an investment in the business community, it's an investment in the social order," Sharpton told an enthusiastic crowd of about 200 during an early evening rally inside the War Memorial auditorium.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | November 7, 1999
A city, if it has any vitality at all, will always be in flux physically. Buildings rise and fall. Streets open and close. People come and go.But do we sometimes become so accustomed to the transitory nature of our surroundings that visual clutter and jumble don't register anymore? Can we become so inured to ugliness that we no longer care about beauty?Those questions are prompted by the newest addition to Baltimore's Mount Royal cultural district, home of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Lyric Opera House and the Maryland Institute, College of Art.Near the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Howard Street -- a gateway to the cultural district -- is land that was once a well-manicured lawn for the Baltimore Life Insurance Co. Now owned by the state of Maryland, the property in recent months has been turned into an open-air storage yard for a contractor working for the Mass Transit Administration.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
A trivia game was winding down in the dance room of Grand Central, a popular Mount Vernon bar, and a handful of customers stood in circles chatting and finishing their drinks. Just after 1 a.m., a pair of men walked in and sauntered off to play a game of pool. Moments later one of the men returned with a gun. "He said, `I don't want any problems, just give me the money out of the register,' " recalled Greg Lattin, who was working that October morning and handed over $1,800. The holdup is part of what city police are calling a spike in crime in Mount Vernon and Mid-Town Belvedere - some of which police say is fueled by gangs who send recruits out to snatch cell phones as part of initiation rites.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
The Mount Vernon Cultural District will begin its spring and summer series of concerts today at noon with a performance by students from Baltimore School for the Arts and the Peabody Institute. Hourlong concerts are planned for the first Thursday of each month at noon in Mount Vernon's West Park, showcasing area opera singers. Concerts are also planned for Sunday afternoons from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. as part of the cultural district's Lazy Susan series. The first one is set for Sunday with a performance by Rude Dog's Rhythm Revue.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Linking Mount Vernon's music, art, theater and other attractions, community leaders formally unveiled last week a master plan for the downtown cultural district and announced a $21 million fund-raising campaign for its comeback.The idea is to make Mount Vernon an arts and cultural destination, just as the Inner Harbor is a recreational and shopping destination.Jamie Hunt, director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District Inc., and Constance Kaplan, the board president, presented a $21 million proposal Wednesday to about 60 people at a breakfast meeting in the Walters Art Gallery.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Linking Mount Vernon's music, art, theater and other attractions, community leaders formally unveiled last week a master plan for the downtown cultural district and announced a $21 million fund-raising campaign for its comeback.The idea is to make Mount Vernon an arts and cultural destination, just as the Inner Harbor is a recreational and shopping destination.Jamie Hunt, director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District Inc., and Constance Kaplan, the board president, presented a $21 million proposal Wednesday to about 60 people at a breakfast meeting in the Walters Art Gallery.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Linking Mount Vernon's music, art, theater and other attractions, community leaders formally unveiled last week a master plan for the downtown cultural district and announced a $21 million fund-raising campaign for its comeback.The idea is to make Mount Vernon an arts and cultural destination, just as the Inner Harbor is a recreational and shopping destination.Jamie Hunt, director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District Inc., and Constance Kaplan, the board president, presented a $21 million proposal Wednesday to about 60 people at a breakfast meeting in the Walters Art Gallery.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
The Mount Vernon neighborhood's institutional leaders are embarking on a long-term strategy to win more visitors to its core of stately landmarks while addressing its stock of neglected 19th-century homes and apartments.This morning, before conferring with Philadelphia officials about that city's tourism efforts, caretakers of the Mount Vernon Cultural District -- a nonprofit group founded three years ago -- will hear the initial report in a $50,000 study designed to solidify the neighborhood as a "premier cultural destination."
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 25, 2001
One of Baltimore's oldest auto repair facilities will soon be reborn as the new headquarters of the Catholic Review newspaper and its parent organization, the Cathedral Foundation. This year, the nonprofit foundation purchased the former Griffin's Garage at 878 Park Ave. - a three-story, 1909 building that most recently housed the Park Sign Co. - and plans to begin converting it this summer. The project is the latest boost for the Mount Royal Cultural District and will keep an influential publishing house in the city.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Bob Niles has been selling entertainment for years. Much of the time, he did it from Rockefeller Center as a high-powered executive with NBC. But these days his home base is Baltimore, and his mission more local. Niles' new job as executive director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District is to establish a brand for the neighborhood, to bring in more visitors and to get them to stay longer. "It's an area that invites you to slow down and enrich your life by taking in what's around you," said Niles, 57. "It's a very special urban, cultural village.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
The Mount Vernon Cultural District will begin its spring and summer series of concerts today at noon with a performance by students from Baltimore School for the Arts and the Peabody Institute. Hourlong concerts are planned for the first Thursday of each month at noon in Mount Vernon's West Park, showcasing area opera singers. Concerts are also planned for Sunday afternoons from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. as part of the cultural district's Lazy Susan series. The first one is set for Sunday with a performance by Rude Dog's Rhythm Revue.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
It had been billed as a showdown between a small handful of Mount Vernon residents desperate to save a venerable building and a wealthy parking magnate inclined to give the place the wrecking ball. That square-off didn't happen, though. Instead, the seeming foes joined forces yesterday in an auction's dying minute to keep the decades-old MacGillivray's building at Charles and Read streets out of the hands of a third, mystery bidder. At a final price of $600,000, the group of neighborhood residents who had hurriedly amassed pledges during the weekend eked out a win. And they did so with a late assist from Kingdon Gould III, a Howard County developer whose family owns PMI Parking.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 11, 2003
The service at Abacrombie isn't as bad as it seems. It's just that the restaurant, which is across from the Meyerhoff, has gotten swamped. At 6 p.m. every table was taken. By 8 p.m. everyone has gone to the concert, leaving just my husband, a couple of friends and me. Customer-wise, it's feast or famine at this location. It always has been. It was when the space was La Tesso Tana, and before that when it was Grille 58. For some reason, despite pretty dining rooms and good food, people have always forgotten about the restaurants here unless there's an event at the Meyerhoff or Lyric.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 25, 2001
One of Baltimore's oldest auto repair facilities will soon be reborn as the new headquarters of the Catholic Review newspaper and its parent organization, the Cathedral Foundation. This year, the nonprofit foundation purchased the former Griffin's Garage at 878 Park Ave. - a three-story, 1909 building that most recently housed the Park Sign Co. - and plans to begin converting it this summer. The project is the latest boost for the Mount Royal Cultural District and will keep an influential publishing house in the city.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2000
A dilapidated four block area of downtown Baltimore's west side would be recast into an African-American nightclub and entertainment district, under a proposal by a group of city legislators led by state Sen. Clarence M. Mitchell IV. The project, met with guarded optimism by some area merchants, aims to revive a mostly run-down and boarded-up retail area bordered by Saratoga, Franklin, Park and Eutaw streets and let black business people share in the...
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Declaring that Mount Vernon can be a tourist destination second only to the Inner Harbor, nine institutions in the Baltimore neighborhood are banding together to spruce up the area and promote its historic and cultural attractions.The group, calling itself the Mount Vernon Cultural District Committee, is scheduled to announce its plans tomorrow. Its vision begins with more street lighting and signs promoting attractions and grows to include transportation links with the Inner Harbor, sidewalks dotted with cafes and overnight tourist packages complete with admission tickets and hotel discounts.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
Nearly a decade after automobiles were banned from sections of Howard Street for construction of the state's light rail line through Baltimore, a mayoral commission is encouraging the city to bring them back.The group of 60 business owners and community leaders also would like to see the city build a large meeting and exposition center along Howard Street to replace Festival Hall, the recently demolished exhibit center that drew thousands to the Convention Center area for car shows, crafts fairs and other events.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Linking Mount Vernon's music, art, theater and other attractions, community leaders formally unveiled last week a master plan for the downtown cultural district and announced a $21 million fund-raising campaign for its comeback.The idea is to make Mount Vernon an arts and cultural destination, just as the Inner Harbor is a recreational and shopping destination.Jamie Hunt, director of the Mount Vernon Cultural District Inc., and Constance Kaplan, the board president, presented a $21 million proposal Wednesday to about 60 people at a breakfast meeting in the Walters Art Gallery.
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