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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 13, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- University of Maryland officials yesterday dedicated a $4 million African-American cultural center on the flagship campus here.The three-level building, next to Stamp Student Union, is a new home for the Nyumburu Cultural Center, which offers courses and activities aimed at African-American students and others of African descent. However, the programs are open to all students.Pub Date: 9/13/96
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NEWS
February 28, 2014
Annapolis Center These activities are being offered through the Annapolis Senior Activity Center, 119 S. Villa Ave. Information: 410-222-1818. Party A Mardi Gras party will be held at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 5. Wear a costume and enjoy the group Nostalgia performing music from the big band era. Safe driving AARP offers safe-driving training for those 50 and older from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 7. Cost is $20, $15 for AARP members. Concert The Bates Jazz Quintet will perform a free concert at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 12. Trips: •The trip committee is accepting reservations for a trip to Victorian Cape May, N.J., May 19-22.
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NEWS
September 28, 1997
A benefit for the Chesapeake Center for Creative Arts, a cultural center for northern Anne Arundel County, will be held from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. today at 314 Hilltop Road, Linthicum. Tickets are $25 a person.Plans for the center, which is to be housed in the old Brooklyn Park High School building on Hammonds Lane in Brooklyn Park, will be discussed and explained. The center will include a gallery, a theater/performance space and classrooms for art instruction.Programming at the benefit will include exhibitions; performances of music, theater and dance; and classes in the visual, literary and performing arts.
EXPLORE
September 7, 2012
You know you are entering a different world when you see the heavy cordless iron that requires a fire to heat it sitting atop a wooden ironing board covered with a bed sheet used as an ironing pad at the Howard County Center of African American Culture. For those who can remember manual eggbeaters and other hand-held tools hanging from the wall, this is a step back in time. For some, emotion comes with seeing the white wooden kitchen cabinet that held someone's dishes in the early 20th century.
NEWS
By David Foster and David Foster,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 13, 1999
Highlandtown leaders will unveil plans today for the Patterson Theater, which they hope will become a cultural and artistic mecca for Southeast Baltimore.The theater, closed since 1997, is part of the Highlandtown Revitalization effort designed to restore vacant and abandoned properties.Block partyPlans for the theater to become the Patterson Cultural Center will be unveiled at 2 p.m. at "The Patterson's Big Block Party" from noon to 4 p.m. at East and Eastern avenues. The free block party will feature musical performances by the Broadway Choir, Mambo Combo and Gumbo Junkyard.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | September 10, 2007
University of Maryland police are investigating a report of a noose in a tree near a cultural center housing several African-American student organizations as a possible hate crime, campus officials said last night. "The possibility that this act appears intended to bring to mind the horrific crime of lynching, which is such a terrible and tragic part of our nation's past, is particularly abhorrent," wrote UM President C.D. "Dan" Mote Jr. in a letter e-mailed to the campus community Saturday and posted on the school's Web site.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
It's the typical Columbia story: Lured by the promise of a multi-cultural community, acres of manicured outdoor space, good schools, less traffic and crime, Francis Johnson and Pamela Blackwell moved to the planned suburban city from Washington in 1978.These days, Columbia offers much more than cul-de-sacs and tot lots: movies with stadium seating, a growing variety of restaurants, large stores in new strip malls, museums and art galleries, big and small bookstores, concert facilities, teen-friendly sports parks, regionally renowned theater companies and other recreational activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 13, 2004
In the late 1970s, Father Ugo de Censi, an Italian missionary priest of the Salesian Order, arrived in the impoverished Peruvian village of Chacas, nestled in the shadow of the Cordillera Blanca high in the Andes mountains. On inspecting his new parish, de Censi found the town's lovely colonial-era church sadly dilapidated and its beautiful 18th-century altarpiece damaged almost beyond repair. An even more urgent need presented itself in the form of de Censi's parishioners, among the poorest of the poor.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
EUBIE BLAKE, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb. They and countless other Baltimore jazz greats will be honored at the Eubie Blake National Jazz Institute and Cultural Center, which dedicates its new home on Howard St. this weekend. Friday's grand opening and Sunday's family day highlight the new possibilities of the Eubie Blake center, which has been leading a vagabond existence ever since a fire in 1993 forced it out of its previous home. With 21,000 square feet in a building that once was part of the Maryland General Hospital, the Eubie Blake center will finally have room to thrive and grow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and By John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the northeast corner of the nation's capital, beyond the monuments and museums on the Mall, lies the newest tourist attraction in the nation's capital. Part think tank, part art gallery, part interactive museum, the John Paul II Cultural Center could be described as Port Discovery meets the Vatican. The center, which will open to the public March 22, is a $65 million attempt by admirers of John Paul II to preserve the legacy of the pope who had a role in the fall of the Soviet Union and presided over the Roman Catholic Church as it entered its third millennium.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
A large wooded parcel along the bustling Route 24 corridor in Abingdon will become a regional arts center with theaters, galleries, classrooms and community meeting space under a proposal for how to use property unexpectedly left to Harford County by a widow who lived in New Jersey. A larger adjoining tract will be turned into public parkland — described by some as Harford's "Central Park" — under a county-backed plan. The area sits squarely in Harford's designated growth zone and is the largest undeveloped parcel between Interstate 95 and Bel Air, the county seat.
EXPLORE
October 9, 2011
SYKESVILLE - Town of Sykesville officials, county elected officials and members of the Warfield Cultural and Commerce Center board cut the ribbon on Oct. 6 for new "gateway" signs along Route 32 at the Warfield complex. The masonry signs were created by Maryland Division of Correction low-security, pre-release inmates who learned masonry skills while incarcerated. Three of the inmate masons were on hand to see their project dedicated. "What we see here," said Gary Maynard, secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, "is a truly a meaningful inmate project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake keeps an item posted on her refrigerator door that has nothing to do with her day and night job as mayor of Baltimore. It's a 1983 report card from her flute teacher, Bonnie Lake, a now-retired Baltimore Symphony Orchestra member who gave the then-13-year-old student a B-plus. "It reminds me I have a fallback position," Rawlings-Blake said with a laugh. "What it really reminds me is that there are other things in life. " Like the arts. In her short time in office, the mayor has demonstrated a pronounced commitment to the city's cultural community.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
In reading the letter from Debbie DeAngelus where she criticizes state Sen. Andy Harris' opposition to the mosque that she calls a "cultural center" proposed at Ground Zero in Manhattan ("Mosque near Ground Zero is a local issue," Readers Respond, Aug. 20), I wonder if she is aware that there are some 200 mosques on the island of Manhattan, two of which are within two blocks of Ground Zero and nearly eight hundred thousand (yes,800,000) mosques in New York City which could serve the local Muslim population.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
In your recent article, you state that state Sen. Andy Harris feels that building a Community Center near the Ground Zero site is "blatantly disrespectful" and the government should step in to stop it ("Harris calls mosque proposal 'blatantly disrespectful,'" Aug. 18). Is he a member of the party that preaches less-intrusive government? Is Mr. Harris aware that this proposed Cultural Center at the site of a former Burlington Coat Factory would contain recreation facilities for youth, a restaurant and culinary school, education programs, a library and child care services, in addition to a prayer room (mosque)
NEWS
July 1, 2010
The Maryland Transit Administration will suspend operations on the central section of the light rail line next week for construction along Howard Street. The MTA said it would not operate trains between the Camden Yards and Cultural Center stations from July 5 to July 11 but would provide shuttle buses to make connections. The agency said the buses would operate during regular light rail hours and that every third trip would be extended to Penn Station. The shuttle will make stops at all stations except Pratt Street/Convention Center.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
It's the typical Columbia story: Lured by the promise of a multi-cultural community, acres of manicured outdoor space, good schools, less traffic and crime, Francis Johnson and Pamela Blackwell moved to the planned suburban city from Washington in 1978. These days, Columbia offers much more than cul-de-sacs and tot lots: movies with stadium seating, a growing variety of restaurants, large stores in new strip malls, museums and art galleries, big and small bookstores, concert facilities, teen-friendly sports parks, regionally renowned theater companies and other recreational activities.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Cynthia and Sitawi Jahi have done what many people deemed impossible -- run a city recreation center as a private business, to the applause of many neighborhood residents.After putting up with the indignities of a leaky roof and no heat their first year at the center, the husband-wife team set about creating one of the most ambitious such programs in the city, encompassing education, culture and sports at the former Rognel Heights Recreation Center in West Baltimore."If running a rec center is just a job, sometimes people don't have the extra motivation to make the sacrifices to make a program succeed," said Sitawi Jahi.
NEWS
February 21, 2010
Several Anne Arundel County senior activity centers have announced their trip schedules and are accepting deposits. Trips vary per center and include day trips as well as cruises and extended bus trips. South County Senior Center is planning a trip to the Frederick Douglass Museum and Cultural Center from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday. A van will pick up participants at the center at 27 Stepneys Lane in Edgewater and take them to the museum. There will a guided tour, then lunch at the Wild Orchard restaurant in Eastport.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
A ritual bath, steeped in symbols of Judaic faith, will remind those who immerse and pray in its waters of a young rabbi and his wife killed in a terrorist attack in India a year ago. On the tiled walls of its mikvah, a deep, warm-water bath that promises spiritual purity to Jewish women, the Lubavitch Center in Pikesville will hang a marble plaque that reads, "May their merit be a blessing for all those who immerse in these waters." At 11 a.m. Sunday, in a public ceremony, the center will rededicate its Mikvah Mei Menachem in homage to Rabbi Gabi and Rivky Holtzberg.
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