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NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | April 13, 1995
NOTE: Lourdes Sullivan's column appears a day early because of the holiday press schedule. Montpelier Cultural Arts Center will present Maxine Clair, author of "Rattlebone," April 20 at 7:30 p.m.Ms. Clair will read a selection from her works and answer questions afterward. Ms. Clair's essays and poetry have appeared in many literary magazines, but she is perhaps more known for "Rattlebone," the story of a family struggling through segregation and toil. Ms. Clair's appearance is part of a three-day residency at Bowie State College and co-sponsored by the Associated Writing Programs.
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NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 24, 2014
The arts scene is thriving in Harford County, and this summer there are plenty of ways to enjoy it outside. Dance along the banks of the Susquehanna River while listening to live music in Havre de Grace. Dig out the sketch pad and draw colorful flowers, blooming in Pylesville. Or grab your picnic basket to watch a movie under the stars in Bel Air. “The arts in Harford County in the summer are a wonderful way to enjoy the natural beauty of our county, as well as celebrate the arts,” says Martha Valentine, coordinator of the Harford County Cultural Arts Board.
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NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | June 9, 1995
It's the beginning of a new month, so that means the Montpelier Cultural Arts Center is changing the exhibitions around again.Sam Soto, a sculptor who has a studio in the center, exhibits his stone and rawhide pieces in the Resident Artist's Gallery through June 30. There will be a reception in his honor June 16 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. As usual, both the exhibit and the reception are free.Susanne Arnold, a Virginia artist, has been selected from a field of 150 to be the 1995 Montpelier National Visiting artist.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
The Maryland General Assembly has shown that funding for the arts is more precarious than a house of cards ( "How the 'House of Cards' film tax credit shrank ," April 8). Our homegrown nonprofit arts groups simply cannot compete in glamour with the decidedly for-profit Netflix and HBO projects shot in the state, yet lawmakers recently considered dipping into the tiny, $2.5 million Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts in order to lure Netflix into staying in Maryland.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
Carroll Community College wants to be more than a place to learn computer skills or master a second language. It wants to be a local cultural center.The college is preparing to break ground on a new fine- and performing-arts center that officials hope will strengthen its position as a cultural arts magnet.The college "should be not just for academics, but here for the community," said Diana Scott, a community college spokeswoman. "It's called a community college, and what are ways of becoming part of the community?
NEWS
By SUZANNE LOUDERMILK and SUZANNE LOUDERMILK,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
Following the lead of New York, Boston and Washington, a Towson arts group soon will be offering cut-rate tickets for area theater and musical performances.The Maryland Cultural Arts Center at Towson Inc. will set up the region's only half-price, same-day ticket outlet, called BOXoffice, at the Towson branch of the Baltimore County library, starting Tuesday. The outlet also will sell full-price, advance-sale seats through the TicketMaster network."We want to make theater as popular as going to the movies," said Nancy Warner, the nonprofit organization's executive director.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | August 11, 1998
There's still time to catch Al Zaruba's one-person sculpture show at Montpelier Cultural Arts Center, but it closes in a mere nine days. Zaruba's sculptures look like creatures from outer space, and also from your most frightening dreams, which is what makes them relevant.They look like human fears and dreads made visible and therefore are more manageable than when they reside solely in the mind. They're frightening but funny as well, awkward but also obviously the product of a sophisticated, ruminative, highly original mind.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2000
It is "not just a job," Carol Treiber says of her role as executive director of the Cultural Arts Foundation. The foundation supports and promotes artists through a grants program benefiting more than 40 nonprofit county arts groups, and brings artists and students together in its Arts in Education program. It sponsors concerts and art exhibits, publishes a calendar of events every three months, and conducts grant-writing workshops. And staying on top of that broad scope of activities often keeps the 65-year-old Treiber busy after normal working hours.
FEATURES
October 19, 1990
The Cultural Arts Institute is conducting an after school program for students in Baltimore city schools. "CAUSE" (Cultural Arts Uplifting Student Education) is being held in 12 city elementary schools.The program, which was started by director Deborah London 14 years ago, takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. and offers instruction in dance, music and drama. The courses are planned to relate to subjects being taught. The 24-week curriculum ends with a musical theater performance.All the teachers are professional artists.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
ARTFX, 45 West St., Annapolis, an art gallery specializing in handmade pottery, jewelry, sculpture and more, will hold a "Fun Raiser" from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 29 and 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 1 to benefit the Cultural Arts Foundation of Anne Arundel County. During the two-day event, customers who present their "Fun Raiser" flier will have 10 percent of their purchases donated to the Cultural Arts Foundation. Fliers can be obtained by calling 410-222-7949.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 13, 2014
Rebecca Jessop is the new Harford County Cultural Arts Board coordinator, the Department of Community Services announced. Jessop discovered the arts in the early 1990s. She studied acting and was involved with Baltimore's thriving community theatres. Jessop worked as the director of special projects for the historic Senator Theatre for 13 years. She was responsible for everything from world premieres to smaller corporate meetings. She joined Howard Community College-TV in 1996 as a reporter for the cultural and entertainment news segment, Backstage News.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | June 7, 2013
Events throughout the year celebrate the arts and culture of the Harford County community. Among the festivities is the annual Harford County Farm Fair in July, which has generated nearly $1 million for capital improvements to the Harford County Equestrian Center over the years. Another summertime favorite is the annual Havre de Grace parade and fireworks in July, with a concert in Tydings Park facilitated by hundreds of volunteers. There are dedicated organizations in the county whose mission is to make the arts accessible to the community.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
"The New Normal" was supposed to be the new normal. After "Modern Family" brought two gay dads into the spotlight on ABC, NBC was bringing audiences a show that put a gay family at its center. "The New Normal" executive producer Ryan Murphy had already shown two gay teens' first sexual encounter on "Glee. " There was little concern his new show's central couple (Bryan and David) would be the chaste, sexless gay men generally seen on primetime television. I tuned in eagerly when the show premiered, elated to see a romantic gay duo given the amount of screen time generally reserved for straight sitcom leads.
EXPLORE
March 11, 2013
The Harford County Cultural Arts Board is holding its annual Arts Gathering at the Liriodendron Mansion, 502 W. Gordon St. Bel Air, on Wednesday, March 20 from 5 to 7 p.m. The Arts Gathering is free and open to any Harford County arts organization's administration, staff, board members and volunteers. The evening's agenda will include beverages with lite fare, 5 to 5:30 p.m.; a presentation featuring artist Linnea Tober on Marketing for the Artist, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.; and networking, 6:30 to 7 p.m. Tober, a Havre de Grace resident, holds a bachelor of arts in art history from Keen University and a master of arts in teaching from Monmouth University.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit contest items, mail to Contests, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Cultural Arts Showcase 2012 Call for Applicants — Howard County Arts Council is seeking artist applications for its annual Cultural Arts Showcase, a program to assist school and civic organizations in identifying performing, visual and literary artists for workshops, performances, demonstrations and in-school residencies. Attendees of Showcase include cultural arts representatives, PTA Representatives, festival and special event coordinators from Recreation and Parks and other members of the community.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
The Pikesville community's hopes of converting the old Pikes Theater to a cultural arts center got a boost from a last-minute agreement under which the Baltimore County Revenue Authority will buy the building for $800,000.The price is a compromise between the $1 million asking price for the 1937-vintage movie house and the county's appraisal of about $650,000. Revenue Authority Director Kenneth F. Mills Jr. said the Economic Development Commission had given the authority $750,000 last year for the purchase.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | July 31, 1997
A palimpsest, says the dictionary, is a parchment or tablet that has been written upon more than once, the earlier writings incompletely erased so that they remain partly visible. In her installation of the same title at the Montpelier Cultural Arts Center's library gallery, artist Lisa Austin uses the word a little differently. She uses a number of objects, particularly including historical and present-day maps, to explore both the landscape and the culture. With its many doors and windows, the library gallery lends itself well to an examination of the landscape and how people move through it and relate to it.At the library gallery of Montpelier Cultural Arts Center, 12826 Laurel-Bowie Road, Laurel (Route 197 off the Baltimore Washington Parkway)
NEWS
February 7, 2010
The Howard County Arts Council is accepting registration for this annual event March 4 and 5 at Howard County Center for the Arts, 8510 High Ridge Road in Ellicott City. Showcase assists school and cultural civic organizations in identifying visual, literary and performing artists for workshops, performances, demonstrations and residencies. For more information, call 410-313-2787. Registration deadline is Feb. 26. div.talkforum #creditfooter { display: none; } div.talkforum .feedItemAuthor { display: none; }
NEWS
By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Gary Vikan, director of the Walters Art Museum, would tell the mayor to remember that everything is connected and that the arts will only thrive if the rest of the city thrives. "As Willy Don [Schaefer] used to say, 'everything is a priority,' " Vikan said. "A healthy city will support the arts." He would like her to champion more cooperation between the arts and Baltimore's green spaces and to encourage bringing more culture into the schools. And, of course, he hopes she'll keep the money coming.
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