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NEWS
November 16, 1996
REPORTS OF DEER killed illegally in the Wakefield community in Baltimore County's Timonium, and of razor-sharp deer-hunting arrows found near homes there, have again raised the dilemma of too many deer in the suburbs and the obvious dangers of hunting to cope with the problem.First, these deer were killed by poachers -- outlaw hunters -- because hunting is banned in the Loch Raven Reservoir watershed that surrounds Wakefield. The Department of Natural Resources and watershed police need to respond with patrols to limit danger to residents and recreation users.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,kevin.rector@baltsun.com | August 29, 2008
To hunt or not to hunt is no longer a question. The overabundant deer population in the forests around Loch Raven Reservoir will be culled by hunters for the first time this fall and winter, state and local officials said at a public meeting on the much-debated issue last night at Loch Raven High School. About 225 people filled the school auditorium to hear officials outline the new hunting policy, which animal rights activists have successfully blocked for years. The deer inhabit an area that can't support the current population, said Kurt Kocher, a spokesman for the Baltimore Department of Public Works.
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SPORTS
January 16, 2000
Hockey Coyotes: Recalled G Patrick DesRochers from AHL Springfield. Recalled RW David Oliver from IHL Houston. Re-assigned D Trent Cull to Houston.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2007
Their Christmas list was simple this year: 1. Pick five Santa letters. 2. Buy gifts for the five families. 3. Deliver gifts. "That's the best part," says Lynette Hancock, "we deliver the gifts on Christmas Eve." One afternoon last week, Pete and Lynette Hancock of Harford County rifled through a fat stack of "Needy" Santa letters at the post office in downtown Baltimore. "Operation Santa" is the Postal Service's nearly century-old program that matches wish lists with volunteers. The main post office on Fayette Street participates every year.
NEWS
By Staff Report | November 28, 1993
A 54-year-old Finksburg man was flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore after his car collided with another on Route 140 near the 140 Village Shopping Center about 7:55 a.m. Tuesday.Charles W. Cull Jr., of the 2200 block of Cedar Hill Drive, was released from the hospital at 2 p.m. the same day, according to a spokeswoman.City police said Mr. Cull was westbound on Route 140 and turned left at a crossover to go into the shopping center.Investigators said he apparently pulled into the path of a 1990 Dodge eastbound on the highway, driven by Sandra Kay Piercy, 49, of Westminster.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 15, 1999
Pakistan tried every form of government. None works.The Nobel Prize for medicine went to a German at Rockefeller U.; chemistry to an Egyptian at Cal Tech; physics to a Dutchman at Michigan; and economics to a Canadian at Columbia, so don't knock foreign docs.Pat Buchanan and Lenora Fulani make a lovely couple.The most effective way to cull the deer herd in suburbia is to introduce wolves.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 14, 2000
The one good thing going for Gore is the braying of the press pack ("boring!"), which lowered expectations to the point where the man can only look and sound good on prime time. Martin O'Malley is not the first aspiring performer who went to La-La-Land in search of being discovered, or the last. The Reform Party cries out for reform! Coyotes are invading Maryland, which is all right if they cull the deer herd.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 24, 2000
The rule of law and sanctity of constitutional institutions are more important than who wins. Q. When is a public record not a public record? A. When the Maryland judiciary finds it inconvenient. Larry Young could do for the NAACP what he did for the Maryland Senate. If the American people are not able to cull the deer herd with guns, we'll just have to do it with cars.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
Tomorrow, regulations for crabbers and rockfish anglers change, with the minimum size for rockfish dropping to 26 inches from 28 and conservation measures going into effect for commercial and some recreational crabbers.New crabbing regulations will:Shorten the season to run from April 1 to Nov. 30.Prohibit recreational crabbers using collapsible traps, crab net rings and trotlines from crabbing on Wednesdays.Allow recreational crabbers using hand lines, dip nets and pots set at private piers to crab seven days a week.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 6, 2007
Although Westminster recently lifted a six-month building moratorium caused by a water deficit, development issues as well as calls for greater conservation efforts are central to the City Council campaigns under way in the Carroll County seat. Six candidates, including three incumbents, are vying for three seats on the five-member council May 14. Incumbents Suzanne P. Albert, Gregory Pecoraro and Robert Wack face challengers Charles W. Cull, William Gill and Kenneth Warren. Some stalled residential developments are moving forward, but since the city's new growth and water allocation policies are still evolving, Albert, Pecoraro and Wack said their experience could help see Westminster through this transitional period.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,sun reporter | May 22, 2007
Again, American Idol has the last laugh. It was supposed to be all over in February when spunky backup singer Melinda Doolittle outsang everyone and their grandmothers. It was supposed to be ruined in March when Howard Stern and his Internet allies conspired to make the well-coiffed but talentless Sanjaya Malakar the winner. But tonight and tomorrow, the show -- still the biggest on TV -- is poised to have one of its most competitive finales ever as trendy beatboxer Blake Lewis takes on 17-year-old diva-in-waiting Jordin Sparks.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 6, 2007
Although Westminster recently lifted a six-month building moratorium caused by a water deficit, development issues as well as calls for greater conservation efforts are central to the City Council campaigns under way in the Carroll County seat. Six candidates, including three incumbents, are vying for three seats on the five-member council May 14. Incumbents Suzanne P. Albert, Gregory Pecoraro and Robert Wack face challengers Charles W. Cull, William Gill and Kenneth Warren. Some stalled residential developments are moving forward, but since the city's new growth and water allocation policies are still evolving, Albert, Pecoraro and Wack said their experience could help see Westminster through this transitional period.
BUSINESS
By ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO and ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 2006
CHICAGO -- Since its collapse in late 2001, Enron Corp. has baffled investors and the public alike with its Byzantine accounting and convoluted transactions, which reaped millions of dollars for executives and ultimately helped bring down the company. But in recent weeks, government lawyers who will try the case against Enron's former chief executives, Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling, have signaled that they intend to spend less time befuddling jurors with talk of Enron's accounting.
NEWS
July 20, 2005
On July 19, 2005, RAE V. CULLINGS, beloved husband of the late Anna Cullings; devoted father of Anna L. Wagner, Joseph James and Gary Ray Cullings; cherished grandfather of Teresa Sedlak, Kevin Linn, Donovan, Christopher, Douglas and Anthony Cullings. Also survived by seven great-grandchildren. Funeral service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, Thursday, 1:30 P.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens. Visiting hours, Wednesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Drive, P.O. Box 43025, Baltimore, MD 21236.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | February 20, 2005
Hanging around backstage at the Academy Awards for 10 years, you pick up a few things. And, if you're a writer, you put them in a book, which is what Steve Pond has done in The Big Show: High Times and Dirty Dealings Backstage at the Academy Awards. Pond, originally granted permission to be a fly on Oscar's wall 10 years ago for a story for Premiere magazine, has been backstage at every Academy Awards since 1995. With this year's ceremonies only a week away, he agreed to answer some questions about what goes on behind the scenes of the movie industry's biggest night.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
Animal-rights activists filed a lawsuit yesterday in an effort to stop Maryland's first bear hunt in 51 years. The Fund for Animals and the Humane Society of the United States, both based in Montgomery County, have asked for an injunction to temporarily stop the hunt and for a hearing before Oct. 25, the first day of the season. "People are outraged about this hunt," said Michael Markarian, president of the Fund for Animals. "It runs contrary to the wishes of the public, the wishes of the legislature and statutory mandates.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | March 2, 2004
The Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a public hearing on proposed regulations to govern the state's first black bear hunt in a half-century. The department plans to hold a lottery-style hunt to cull 30 animals from a population estimated at 427. A bill to scuttle the hunt was killed last week in the House Environmental Matters Committee. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on March 10 at Beall Junior-Senior High School in Frostburg. The hunt is scheduled to take place Oct. 25-30 and Dec. 6-11 in Garrett County and the portion of Allegany County that lies west of Evitt's Creek.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
The Department of Natural Resources opened a series of public meetings on proposed changes in blue crab regulations here Tuesday night, proposals that were met with mixed opinions from about three dozen recreational and commercial crabbers.Dave Blazer, assistant to the director of DNR's Tidal Fisheries Division, opened the meeting at Annapolis High School by saying DNR wants feedback from the public so that the proposed regulations can be fine-tuned to meet the needs of the user groups.The goals of the proposals, Blazer said, are to allow a "reasonable" fishery for all crabbers, to be conservative in the size of the crab harvest and to ensure that Maryland and Virginia regulations on crabbing work in concert for the benefit of the fisheries.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 2, 2004
Howard County's sixth annual managed deer hunt will begin Oct. 18 and run through Feb. 10 in four parks, officials announced this week. Phil Norman, the county's deer project manager, said all the hunts at David Force Park, the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area, Blandair and Alpha Ridge Park will follow the same rules and safety measures used in past years. Officials are considering using a certified sharpshooter on unused land surrounding the landfill adjoining Alpha Ridge Park. Norman explained that a sharpshooter would use a high-powered rifle that might afford a more accurate shot, rather than shotguns or bows and arrows required in other county park hunts.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | March 2, 2004
The Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a public hearing on proposed regulations to govern the state's first black bear hunt in a half-century. The department plans to hold a lottery-style hunt to cull 30 animals from a population estimated at 427. A bill to scuttle the hunt was killed last week in the House Environmental Matters Committee. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on March 10 at Beall Junior-Senior High School in Frostburg. The hunt is scheduled to take place Oct. 25-30 and Dec. 6-11 in Garrett County and the portion of Allegany County that lies west of Evitt's Creek.
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