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By Donna Ellis | August 29, 2012
Celebrity chefs are all the rage these days, thanks to the "miracle" of the Food Network and its ilk, even PBS. Of course, like actors and professional athletes, not everyone makes it to star status. And, indeed, there are plenty of workers in the culinary field who never quite make it to the big time. But, as they say, you have to start somewhere. And the first step, usually, is through training. So, next time you drive by Lincoln College of Technology on Snowden River Parkway, note the big sign that reads "Lincoln Culinary Institute.
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By Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 1, 2014
Chief Experience Officer, Victoria Gastro Pub, Columbia victoriagastropub.com What sparked your interest in your career field? This is an easy one - my mom. When I was 4 months old, my mother started making all the desserts for her mother's restaurant. She was self-taught and loved being in the kitchen. She passed her love for food to me. So, naturally, I went to culinary school to pursue my passion for food. Where Mom is definitely the baker of our family, I enjoy cooking dishes that I can throw together depending on my mood or the season.
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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1994
MOSCOW -- When Moscow's culinary school dropped Marxism-Leninism and dialectical materialism from its three-year course of study, the school could no longer hide the fact that it offered only three months of instruction in actual cooking.If Communist ideology ruined Russia's economy, it had a truly frightening effect on culinary science.Restaurants and cafeterias seemed to compete to offer insulting service -- closing for an hour at lunchtime for the staff to eat, or haughtily turning customers away from a cavernous and empty room because they hadn't made reservations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
It's a frosty winter's day in this historic town on Maryland's Eastern Shore, but inside a little red-brick restaurant called The BBQ Joint, the vibe is warm and the barbecue is smoking hot. Savory aromas waft from the open kitchen as chef/owner Andrew Evans and his staff chat up lunch patrons while serving finger-lickin' food. The menu in this cozy, colorful spot - with its sawdust-covered floors and an antique painting of a portly Berkshire pig - might be described as down-home fare meets epicurean flair.
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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
He stood on the highest step of the winners' platform as the gold medal was hung around his neck and thousands applauded."It was awesome," he said. "I knew I did a good job . . . but I didn't think I placed first."Kaui Stryhn, 21, of Hampstead was in Louisville, Ky., June 23 for the Skill Olympics, an event sponsored by the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America, or VICA.His event: culinary arts.He placed first in the nation in the two-part contest.In the first part, the cooks were given a selection of ingredients, a menu and three hours to prepare a four-course meal.
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By Carl Schoettler and Jacques Kelly and Carl Schoettler and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Haussner's Restaurant, a Highlandtown landmark for 73 years, will close at the end of the month and take another piece of the heart of an older, gentler and starchier Baltimore with it.Baltimore without Haussner's -- where generations of patrons dined from an old-fashioned menu top-heavy with calories, surrounded by walls crammed with paintings, ceramics and sculpture -- seems as unthinkable as Paris without the Louvre, Washington without the Monument, San...
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By Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 1, 2014
Chief Experience Officer, Victoria Gastro Pub, Columbia victoriagastropub.com What sparked your interest in your career field? This is an easy one - my mom. When I was 4 months old, my mother started making all the desserts for her mother's restaurant. She was self-taught and loved being in the kitchen. She passed her love for food to me. So, naturally, I went to culinary school to pursue my passion for food. Where Mom is definitely the baker of our family, I enjoy cooking dishes that I can throw together depending on my mood or the season.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Food Editor | December 30, 1998
Take three women in transition, add a generous dose of resolve and a fistful of determination. Stir gently into the mix at Baltimore International College and simmer for two years.Remove slowly to shape Culinary Relief, one of the Baltimore area's newest catering businesses.The venture, which grew from a class project at the culinary school, is the dream of graduating students Gloria Gadsden of Catonsville, 44; Yvonne Chavis of Ferndale, 54; and Tracey Taylor of Randalls-town, 32 - women who were seeking a midlife change.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,sun reporter | December 3, 2006
Teen chefs face the competition For two hours they mixed, measured, kneaded and chopped. The assignment: Create a meal of homemade pasta, breadsticks and salad. Thirty Anne Arundel County high school students took on the challenge Friday at a cook-off at Anne Arundel Community College's Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Tourism Institute in Glen Burnie. The sixth annual event is sponsored by the community college and Anne Arundel County Public Schools. After taking a tour of the school facility and creating personalized aprons, the students were divided into teams of three and the contest began.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
Maybe they were desperate for Carolina-style pulled pork or St. Louis-style ribs. Or maybe they had heard about the 32 taps and the new bourbon bar inside Kloby's Smokehouse in Laurel. But at the exact moment Kloby's owners Michele and Steve Klobosits got the last of their approvals and were allowed to open their doors, a group of 40 people was waiting outside — one group of 40 people. The Klobositses were ready for them. It takes a lot to ruffle Michele Klobosits, who sounded serene and calm about opening her family's expanded barbecue restaurant on the Fourth of July weekend.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | August 29, 2012
Celebrity chefs are all the rage these days, thanks to the "miracle" of the Food Network and its ilk, even PBS. Of course, like actors and professional athletes, not everyone makes it to star status. And, indeed, there are plenty of workers in the culinary field who never quite make it to the big time. But, as they say, you have to start somewhere. And the first step, usually, is through training. So, next time you drive by Lincoln College of Technology on Snowden River Parkway, note the big sign that reads "Lincoln Culinary Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Duff Goldman quite literally ate his way across America to film the series "Sugar High" last year - from sea to sugary sea. And we aren't talking Hollywood smoke-and-mirrors eating, where it looks like someone is tasting something but is really spitting it into an off-camera bucket. It was real - all too real, as Goldman now realizes. Bread pudding. S'mores. Apple strudel. Mousse. Maple bacon doughnuts. Bananas Foster. Fried dough. Cookies. Pie. "I was literally eating dessert all day, every day, for seven weeks straight," he says, explaining how he "blew up," gaining no less than 30 pounds, though he was too depressed to get on the scale to see an actual number.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge has dismissed a $5 million lawsuit filed against the former president of Baltimore International College by the board of the defunct culinary school. The suit, a counterclaim, alleged that Roger Chylinski, who founded the college and served as its president from 1980 to 2010, misused more than $200,000 for personal meals, antiques and unapproved salary. But Judge John Phillip Miller issued a dismissal May 7 without a hearing or written explanation.
NEWS
Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Baltimore International College has reached a legal settlement that will allow it to remain accredited until the end of the year, when officials expect the downtown culinary college to be taken over by Virginia-based Stratford University. Baltimore International College has reached a legal settlement that will allow it to remain accredited until the end of the year, when officials expect the downtown culinary school to be taken over by Virginia-based Stratford University. The settlement ended a court battle between Baltimore International and the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, which planned to strip the college of its accreditation at the end of August — a move that could have forced the school to close.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
Maybe they were desperate for Carolina-style pulled pork or St. Louis-style ribs. Or maybe they had heard about the 32 taps and the new bourbon bar inside Kloby's Smokehouse in Laurel. But at the exact moment Kloby's owners Michele and Steve Klobosits got the last of their approvals and were allowed to open their doors, a group of 40 people was waiting outside — one group of 40 people. The Klobositses were ready for them. It takes a lot to ruffle Michele Klobosits, who sounded serene and calm about opening her family's expanded barbecue restaurant on the Fourth of July weekend.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Bethenny Frankel has turned her one-time unhealthy obsession with being thin into a multifaceted empire. Her Skinnygirl brand features supplements and reduced-calorie margaritas. She has cookbooks, exercise videos and soul-baring tomes. The natural food chef-turned-reality television star is finding success in food — the source of decades of struggle. "I was obsessed with being thin," Frankel, 40, recalled. "I didn't care about health. " Frankel, who started dieting at 8, will mix heart-wrenching tales with humor and good old-fashioned girl talk Saturday night when she appears at the Hippodrome for "Skinnygirl Night Out: A Conversation with Bethenny Frankel.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
Adam Leatherman and Xaviera Rosado waited for the signal that it was time to attend to the delicate piece of chocolate, shaped like a branch, that was being attached to a chocolate mask. The high school students, who were assisting Howard Community College culinary instructor David Milburn, quickly sprayed a steady stream of compressed air from an aerosol can onto the heated chocolate, which immediately cooled - bonding the two pieces together. Their masterpiece, which had the theme of "A Turn-of-the-Century Paris Carnival," was complete.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Bethenny Frankel has turned her one-time unhealthy obsession with being thin into a multifaceted empire. Her Skinnygirl brand features supplements and reduced-calorie margaritas. She has cookbooks, exercise videos and soul-baring tomes. The natural food chef-turned-reality television star is finding success in food — the source of decades of struggle. "I was obsessed with being thin," Frankel, 40, recalled. "I didn't care about health. " Frankel, who started dieting at 8, will mix heart-wrenching tales with humor and good old-fashioned girl talk Saturday night when she appears at the Hippodrome for "Skinnygirl Night Out: A Conversation with Bethenny Frankel.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Rich Hoffman, a chef-instructor at Baltimore International College, shared some culinary truisms with students in his French cuisine class last week. "Everything's better with bacon. " "Never, ever, ever add alcohol to a pan on an open flame. " And, when marinating chicken pieces in red wine overnight for coq au vin, expect this: "Your chicken is going to turn purple. It's supposed to. Don't freak out. " Hoffman teaches aspiring professional chefs at BIC, but the 30 students in this class were there simply to sharpen their skills as home cooks.
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