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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The Foreman Wolf restaurant group has made changes, big and small, to all of its restaurants. Formats have been massaged, tweaked and occasionally overhauled at Charleston , Cinghiale and Petit Louis Bistro . Pazo especially has been in a state of almost continuous flux since its late 2004 opening. The menu at first focused on tapas-style dining and later emphasized a more traditional appetizer-entree approach. Dancing and a clublike atmosphere were promoted for a while, and then not so much.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Some of the Chesapeake region's culinary stars will have their own Inner Harbor showcase during Star-Spangled Spectacular, the free festival commemorating the bicentennial of the national anthem. Presented by Spike Gjerde of Woodberry Kitchen and the developer Scott Plank, the Chesapeake Bay Demo Kitchen & Brew Garden will offer a busy schedule of chefs, brew masters, wine makers and cider makers in the  The  Harry D. Kaufman Pavilion at Rash Field.  From Friday through Sunday, such notable chefs as Gjerde, Bryan Voltaggio (Aggio)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Almost four years in, B&O American Brasserie, the restaurant inside the Hotel Monaco, has established itself as a worthy citizen of Baltimore. Before it came along, downtown dining options were scarce, especially at night, both for visitors and the hometown crowd. Now, nearby office workers have a handsome and uplifting after-work destination, a smartly designed space within an impressive 13-story Beaux Arts building, once the headquarters of the B&O Railroad and now part of the San Francisco-based Kimpton Hotels & Restaurant Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
We love a good anniversary. Baltimore is about to host a huge, weeklong celebration for the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Unless they're traveling by frigate, everybody and his brother is going to be passing through Locust Point on the way to Fort McHenry. Also celebrating - Locust Point's own Wine Market Bistro, which is marking its 10th anniversary this month with various promotions and by feting diners with complimentary hors d'ouevres and wine tastings. The restaurant has earned the celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2002
Add another exotic cuisine to the growing list of those offered at Baltimore-area eateries. A new Parkville restaurant/carryout claims to be the first here to have food from Nepal on its menu. Nepal native Chandra Chhantyal opened Mount Everest at 1842 E. Joppa Road about a month ago. His cousin - and Everest manager - Lok Chhantyal - describes Nepal's cuisine as similar to Indian, but says it's not as spicy. He says the restaurant serves some of the most popular dishes from Nepal, including mo mo - a meat dumpling mixed with Nepali spices, cooked in a steam pot and served with a traditional Nepali soup ($8.99)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gather up three of your best dining friends and set a date for Puerto 511. But make a reservation first. Word is out about Puerto 511, and diners were being turned away, nicely, on a recent Saturday night. Bring along a bottle of wine or a six-pack of beer, too. Puerto 511 has a BYOB policy. And plan your route. Puerto 511 is not easy to find. The restaurant's plain entrance is on an obscure block of Clay Street, a few blocks south of the central Enoch Pratt Free Library.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | November 17, 1991
Let other writers dish the dirt on Columbus. As the 500th anniversary of his voyage to the Americas approaches we'll be getting a bellyful of icon-smashing, as the hero of school children and Italian-Americans is taken to task for polluting Paradise with imperialism, anti-Semitism, slavery and the plague. For starters.Not by Raymond Sokolov, though.As he writes in his new book "Why We Eat What We Eat," "I come to praise Columbus, not to harry his memory. I come to laud the most unassailably admirable of his achievements -- the diversification and betterment of the human diet."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
The Red Parrot is far from the first restaurant in Baltimore to mix Asian cuisines on its menu. But it might be setting a giddy new standard. The cuisines keep coming — and never seem to stop. Among the first listed appetizers are Japanese spring rolls, Malaysian roti, Vietnamese spring rolls and Thai golden calamari. Among the noodle dishes are Singapore rice noodles with ground pork, yaki udon, pad Thai and pho. Such a mix would be a stretch at many restaurants, but this newcomer in Locust Point's McHenry Row development handles its far-ranging menu with competence and panache.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | November 14, 1994
The most horrifying book about computer culture that I've ever read landed on my desk last week. The title is "Gigabites: The Hacker Cookbook" by Jenz Johnson.It has nothing to do with viruses, worms, Trojan horses and other things that go bump in the eternal night of cyberspace. It's far more insidious. It's about food, hacker food. It's about Twinkie Casserole, Chinese Leftover Lasagna, Liverwurst and Anchovy Tub, Fish Stick Stir-fry, Hot Dog Stroganoff, Spam Sushi and Cold Pop Tart Soup.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
As a spate of recent cookbooks makes clear, there's plenty of soul - in the form of tradition and reminiscence - in the kinds of foods favored by African-American cooks. But if you're going to talk about the dishes, you might want to find a more inclusive term than soul food.Call it Southern revival, African-American (as in Italian-American) or heritage cooking. For those terms more accurately reflect the history of food prepared by people of color, say today's chefs and cookbook authors.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
When Shirlé Hale-Koslowski tells people what she does for a living, she is often greeted with a blank stare. She is the owner and sole employee of Four Corners Cuisine, a Baltimore-based private chef service Hale-Koslowski operates out of the kitchens of her 10 clients. People have heard of personal chefs for the rich and famous, she says, but she caters to the middle class, not the multimillionaire. Each meal - groceries and labor included - averages $10 to $12 and includes an entree and a side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Pazo opened in 2004 with a Spanish-influenced menu and it kept on being Spanish until just last month, when it unveiled a new, wholly Italian format. That's a pretty big change. I'd compare it to the ninth season of "Roseanne," when the Conners won $108 million in the Ohio state lottery. Has Pazo jumped the shark? Hardly. Pazo is still in the hands of Baltimore's most capable restaurateurs, the Foreman Wolf group, who have a track record of making their restaurants work.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The phenomenon known as the pop-up dinner, in which nontraditional spaces are converted into short-term dining venues, has been around for a few years. But a quickly expanding company named Dinner Lab is bringing what originally was a haphazard practice to a professional scale. And Baltimore is among the newest markets for the New Orleans-based company. Dinner Lab will make its official Baltimore debut on Aug. 15. The company is now enrolling subscribers for its series of dining events, each of which showcases a single chef who creates a multicourse menu for the dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
  The chef changes in Harbor East are piling up. On Wednesday, Julian Marucci officially took over executive duties at Pazo . He will remain the executive chef at Cinghiale . Both restaurants are in the Foreman Wolf restaurant group. The Bagby Restaurant Group has announced two promotions at its Harbor East restaurants. Nate Magat, formerly the chef de cuisine at Ten Ten American Bistro, is now the executive chef at Fleet Street Kitchen . And John Hufnagel is now the executive chef at Ten Ten Bistro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The Foreman Wolf restaurant group has made changes, big and small, to all of its restaurants. Formats have been massaged, tweaked and occasionally overhauled at Charleston , Cinghiale and Petit Louis Bistro . Pazo especially has been in a state of almost continuous flux since its late 2004 opening. The menu at first focused on tapas-style dining and later emphasized a more traditional appetizer-entree approach. Dancing and a clublike atmosphere were promoted for a while, and then not so much.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Baltimore-based spice and seasonings maker Fuchs North America said Wednesday it has launched a new line of ethnic seasonings, marinades and flavor bases to sell to food service and food manufacturing customers. Fuchs' Ethnic Inspirations Collection will include products inspired by Asian, Latin and African styles of cuisine, including African Barbecue Marinade, Gochuiang Seasoning, Kashmiri Lamb Seasoning, Mojo Dressing Base and Vietnamese Dressing Base. The collection was designed to build on traditional elements of national cuisines, and will be used to develop custom products for food service customers and processed foods to be sold at retail.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 3, 2006
Food: *** (3 stars) Service: *** (3 stars) Atmosphere: ** (2 stars) A source whose opinion I trust told me MemSahib was the best Indian restaurant in Baltimore. This surprised me, because Baltimore has a number of very good Indian restaurants. Even more surprising is the fact that any sit-down restaurant with a liquor license has managed to hang on in this location - the Lexington Market - for more than three years. MemSahib does it by having a thriving lunch business, drawn by an all-you-can-eat buffet for $6.95.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 22, 1991
Tony Cheng'sSzechuan RestaurantWhere: 801 N. Charles St.Hours: Open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays.Credit Cards: AE, MC, V.Features: Sichuan, Hunan and Mandarin cuisine.Non-smoking section? Yes.Call: 539-6666.** 1/2It was our first Chinese meal of the Year of the Sheep. Actually, though, I had to go look this information up. Tony Cheng's is not the type of restaurant that has the Chinese zodiac printed on its menus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
On a crisp spring morning, chef David Thomas stands in the kitchen of his Parkville cafe, Herb & Soul, prepping for a busy day of cooking. Plastic tubs overflow with fresh kale, while shelves hold spices that will impart flavor to the chef's Old Bay Fried Chicken, mac and cheese, and smoked chili-rubbed boneless short ribs with homemade sauce. At first blush, the menu might bring to mind soul food, although Thomas describes his farm-to-table, sustainable fare as Southern fusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gather up three of your best dining friends and set a date for Puerto 511. But make a reservation first. Word is out about Puerto 511, and diners were being turned away, nicely, on a recent Saturday night. Bring along a bottle of wine or a six-pack of beer, too. Puerto 511 has a BYOB policy. And plan your route. Puerto 511 is not easy to find. The restaurant's plain entrance is on an obscure block of Clay Street, a few blocks south of the central Enoch Pratt Free Library.
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