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Cuckoo

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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
The Cuckoo, set near the end of the Second World War, resembles one of those post-Civil War Westerns in which a Yank, a Rebel and a spunky pioneer woman form an unconventional union - except in this case, the soldiers are Finnish (Ville Haapasalo) and Russian (Viktor Bychkov), the earthy widow is a Lapp (Anni-Kristiina Juuso), and instead of gratifying action, we get a blast of Lapland mysticism that might have played better during the counterculture. The movie is satisfying only in bits and pieces; it's as flat and segmented as a triptych.
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By Dave Rosenthal | July 15, 2013
I admire J.K. Rowling for resisting the urge to kick back on her own private island, one paved with gold coins from the royalties on her Harry Potter series. Not only has she published "The Casual Vacancy," an "adult" novel (as if HP was only for kids), but she has now been outed as the author of a well-received mystery. The Sunday Times revealed that Rowling wrote "The Cuckoo's Calling" under the name Robert Galbraith and kept up the pretence that it was the work of a married father of two and former undercover investigator.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 9, 1997
Brady settled for 31 mill, showing that for men of character, some things are more important than money.Why not just give the city treasury to Mr. Paterakis & friends, and forget the hotel that nobody wants?The second and third biggest Swiss banks will merge into the world's second biggest and fire 13,000 workers, who can make cuckoo clocks.Jermaine Lewis for Gov!Pub Date: 12/09/97
ENTERTAINMENT
Beth Aaltonen and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Back from Tribal Council, the members of 'Stealth 'R Us' (I still hate that name) immediately leave to discuss what happened at the last Tribal Council. They believe that Malcolm, Eddie and Reynold no longer have any Immunity Idols, but as only we (and Malcolm) know, that's wrong. Phillip and Cochran are discussing Dawn, and how you might be able to win against her, when they hear Dawn screaming. She's freaking out about something and it's hard to understand what she's saying, but I think she has a dental retainer for bottom teeth that she had replaced, and she somehow lost it. She doesn't want anyone else to know (well, we all know about it now)
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
For 20 years, Paul Ganoe built houses you could live in. Now he makes houses you can eat.The 70-year-old former bricklayer won this year's Historic Savage Mill gingerbread house contest with an 18-inch-tall fireplace topped with a cuckoo clock that sounds every hour."
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 15, 2013
I admire J.K. Rowling for resisting the urge to kick back on her own private island, one paved with gold coins from the royalties on her Harry Potter series. Not only has she published "The Casual Vacancy," an "adult" novel (as if HP was only for kids), but she has now been outed as the author of a well-received mystery. The Sunday Times revealed that Rowling wrote "The Cuckoo's Calling" under the name Robert Galbraith and kept up the pretence that it was the work of a married father of two and former undercover investigator.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 2004
PORTSMOUTH, England - Colin Nhennah is 74 and has lived here in the south of England his entire life, in the county called Hampshire. He is pretty sure he knew that people from his area colonized what is now part of the Northeast of the United States. As far as he's concerned, though, nobody from his side of the Atlantic can be blamed for the peculiar U.S. presidential election system, which today focuses on New Hampshire, his home's namesake. "As far as I'm concerned," Nhennah said, puffing on his pipe and sitting on his bar stool at the Ship Anson pub on Portsmouth's waterfront, "we have a cuckoo government over here and you have a cuckoo government over there, and any election that put those governments in power is cuckoo itself."
NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 31, 1994
TWENTIETH-CENTURY history is tragically replete with examples of nations that became disenchanted with the perfidy of civilian politics and imagined only the military could get things done, could act with patriotic disinterest.Are we experiencing one?Politicians are despised, Congress reviled, the presidency embattled.Running against big government, big spending and bureaucracy the new coin of politics.Yet the largest and most expensive component of government, the hugest of its bureaucracies, the armed forces, enjoys an opposite level of trust, popularity and influence suggesting certain unhappy periods in the history of, say, Argentina.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
What is it about the air in this region and off-duty New York area police officers?Last spring, a group of Big Apple policemen took part in a drunken Washington rampage. They were in D.C. to honor deceased officers. Then, last Thursday, an off-duty Suffolk County, N.Y., officer was tossed out of Oriole Park after beating the stuffing out of the Oriole Bird mascot. He attended the game with 14 fellow Long Island officers.What would make a grown man beat up a team mascot in full view of dozens of onlookers?
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | September 11, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- It's been on the whole a hilarious campaign, and so there's a tremendous temptation to dismiss Tuesday's Maryland primary elections as comic.Comedy has been a dominant theme since the campaigning began. The early pratfalls of Mickey Steinberg, the heroic and unexpected rise of the incomprehensible populist publican American Joe, the choleric rumblings of William Donald Schaefer as each day drags him closer to the great lame-duck void -- all these have been wackily amusing.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
The River Hill High School drama department will present One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, written by Dale Wasserman and based on Ken Kesey's well-known book, at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 14 and 15 in the school auditorium, 12101 Route 108, Clarksville. The black comedy contains difficult subject matter; parental discretion or supervision is strongly advised. The drama department suggests that children younger than 13 be accompanied by an adult. Tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. Sales begin Jan. 3 at the River Hill High School Media Center, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays, and near the school's dining hall from 10:15 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. weekdays.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 2004
PORTSMOUTH, England - Colin Nhennah is 74 and has lived here in the south of England his entire life, in the county called Hampshire. He is pretty sure he knew that people from his area colonized what is now part of the Northeast of the United States. As far as he's concerned, though, nobody from his side of the Atlantic can be blamed for the peculiar U.S. presidential election system, which today focuses on New Hampshire, his home's namesake. "As far as I'm concerned," Nhennah said, puffing on his pipe and sitting on his bar stool at the Ship Anson pub on Portsmouth's waterfront, "we have a cuckoo government over here and you have a cuckoo government over there, and any election that put those governments in power is cuckoo itself."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 24, 2003
The Cuckoo, set near the end of the Second World War, resembles one of those post-Civil War Westerns in which a Yank, a Rebel and a spunky pioneer woman form an unconventional union - except in this case, the soldiers are Finnish (Ville Haapasalo) and Russian (Viktor Bychkov), the earthy widow is a Lapp (Anni-Kristiina Juuso), and instead of gratifying action, we get a blast of Lapland mysticism that might have played better during the counterculture. The movie is satisfying only in bits and pieces; it's as flat and segmented as a triptych.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 15, 2001
Counter-culture guru Ken Kesey died Saturday, and area theatergoers can get a strong sense of his anti-establishment philosophy at the Vagabond Players, where director Barry Feinstein has revived the stage adaptation of Kesey's best-known work, the 1962 novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. It's a story whose themes - the need to rebel against tyranny and the notion that madmen often are saner than their keepers - are timeless, if not exactly fresh. When Randle P. McMurphy gets himself transferred to a state mental hospital to escape hard labor on a work farm, he figures he'll have it easy.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
Ken Kesey was a writer, but he will forever be known not for what he wrote, but for what was written about him. Kesey, who died Saturday at 66, authored a very well-known novel -- One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, in 1962. Its depiction of the confrontation between a rigid nurse and the mental patients under her care has much to say about the challenges to authority that characterized the '60s. But that story will forever belong to Jack Nicholson, who starred in the 1974 movie that Kesey reportedly refused to see. Kesey also wrote a well-respected multi-generational tome, Sometimes a Great Notion, in 1964.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 2000
In "Cecil B. Demented," the latest offering from Baltimore director John Waters, an underground filmmaker (Stephen Dorff) kidnaps a big Hollywood star (Melanie Griffith) and forces her to appear in his next flick. After spending time with the soundtrack album, you might wonder why he didn't grab a few pop stars while he was at it. The songs on "Cecil B. Demented: Music from the Motion Picture" (RCA Victor 09026-63722, arriving in stores today) aren't just noisy and annoying; they're amateurishly so, drawing on rap and club music, thrash and noise rock without doing any of them well.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
The River Hill High School drama department will present One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, written by Dale Wasserman and based on Ken Kesey's well-known book, at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 14 and 15 in the school auditorium, 12101 Route 108, Clarksville. The black comedy contains difficult subject matter; parental discretion or supervision is strongly advised. The drama department suggests that children younger than 13 be accompanied by an adult. Tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. Sales begin Jan. 3 at the River Hill High School Media Center, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays, and near the school's dining hall from 10:15 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. weekdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
Beth Aaltonen and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Back from Tribal Council, the members of 'Stealth 'R Us' (I still hate that name) immediately leave to discuss what happened at the last Tribal Council. They believe that Malcolm, Eddie and Reynold no longer have any Immunity Idols, but as only we (and Malcolm) know, that's wrong. Phillip and Cochran are discussing Dawn, and how you might be able to win against her, when they hear Dawn screaming. She's freaking out about something and it's hard to understand what she's saying, but I think she has a dental retainer for bottom teeth that she had replaced, and she somehow lost it. She doesn't want anyone else to know (well, we all know about it now)
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 9, 1997
Brady settled for 31 mill, showing that for men of character, some things are more important than money.Why not just give the city treasury to Mr. Paterakis & friends, and forget the hotel that nobody wants?The second and third biggest Swiss banks will merge into the world's second biggest and fire 13,000 workers, who can make cuckoo clocks.Jermaine Lewis for Gov!Pub Date: 12/09/97
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 1996
Because of an editing error, Hampstead businessman Seth Shipley was incorrectly identified as a town councilman in the Nov. 20 Carroll edition of The Sun.The Sun regrets the error.THE STAGE AT North Carroll High School has become a state mental hospital in the Pacific Northwest for the Drama Club's latest production, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."The drama is the story of the meekness of numerous long-term patients vs. the powerful compassion of the hospital's newest arrival, Randle P. McMurphy, played by Dave Hammond.
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