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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 1995
The history of 20th century art can seem much too complicated and difficult to follow, with its confusing succession of isms: Cubism, futurism, surrealism, expressionism, etc. What's this all about, anyway?Well, there's no better way to understand art than to look at it, and the Baltimore Museum of Art is now offering an excellent opportunity to follow visually the art of the century's first half. Two new shows containing prints, drawings and photographs take us from the dawn of cubism to the threshold of abstract expressionism; those who want to cross the threshold need only visit the museum's modern wing to see how abstract expressionism developed from what went before it."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2004
Diego Maria Rivera is remembered as one of the towering figures in the school of Mexican mural painters who helped forge a new national identity for their country after the revolution of 1910-20. In the 1920s, Rivera, along with such contemporaries as David Sequeiros and Jose Clemente Orozco, created large-scale public murals to enlist popular support for the new republican government's programs. In doing so, they married the venerable art of fresco painting with a highly expressive modernist language that embodied the revolutionary spirit of their times.
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June 7, 1999
Olivier Debre,79, one of France's best-known abstract painters of the post-war era, whose large-format works include the stage curtain at the Comedie Francaise, died in Paris on Tuesday. His form of art, which he described as "opposite to the geometric abstraction of the Cubism of Cezanne and Picasso," involved daring splashes of color applied with thick brush strokes intended to create a poetic and sensual mood.Ernie Wilkins,79, St. Louis-born composer and saxophonist who played with Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie and Lionel Hampton, died Saturday in Copenhagen, Denmark.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 22, 2001
Pablo Picasso was one of the greatest draftsmen of the 20th century, an artist whose instantly recognizable graphic style was familiar even to people who knew little about art. By the time he died, his revolutionary sense of design had so pervaded popular consciousness that knockoffs of his works adorned everything from book and jazz album covers to calendars and greeting cards. But Picasso (1881-1973) did not develop his unique manner all at once. Though he was a child prodigy whose talent was recognized early by his father, a provincial art teacher and painter, Picasso's earliest works reflected the traditional stylistic conventions of 19th-century academic art. Only after 1900, when he first settled in Paris as a penniless, struggling artist, did his highly personal style began to emerge.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | September 12, 1991
Amalie Rothschild has been an abstract artist for so many years that one simply does not expect a realistic representation of the human figure from her. When this Baltimore artist does render a figure it is likely to be as geometric forms brought together with mathematical precision: the geometry of the human body, if you will.That makes her "Artist and Model" series at the C. Grimaldis Gallery an interesting demonstration of how her recent return to figuration was very much done on her own abstraction-oriented terms.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 1996
"The Face of America" at the Baltimore Museum of Art is maddening and exhilarating, frustrating and rewarding, cluttered with works and bursting with ideas. Like America itself, this show is big, sprawling and hard to get a handle on, but getting to know it is worth the trouble.Subtitled "Modernist Art 1910-1950," it's an attempt to show the many aspects of the modern movement in this country through use of the museum's extensive collection. Five curators were involved in putting it together, and it looks it, containing about 240 works that include paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, decorative arts and textiles.
NEWS
By Edward J. Sozanski and Edward J. Sozanski,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
WASHINGTON - In the first dozen years of his career, Pablo Picasso traveled from the rigorous conservatism of the traditional painting academy to the radical verge of cubism. That's further than ordinary artists travel in a lifetime. But right from the beginning, Picasso demonstrated that he was anything but ordinary.By age 15, he could draw and paint as well as his father, who was an art teacher. A profile portrait of his mother in pastel that he executed at about that age demonstrates not only skill in capturing her likeness but sensitivity to mood, which one doesn't expect in a teen-ager.
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By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
The city's 12th annual ArtScape provided diverse visions for thousands who flocked yesterday to Baltimore's Mount Royal neighborhood -- and a bonanza for the MTA's light-rail system.All you needed to enjoy the day -- and the arts that ranged from the visual to the performing -- was an open mind and a good pair of walking shoes.tTC If you went by light rail, which runs through ArtScape's festivities, you had to have a little patience, as well. A record number of people took the often lightly used trains -- leading transit officials to extend today's riding hours.
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By Thomas Hine and Thomas Hine,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 20, 1992
'Czech Cubism'Where: Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery of the University of the Arts, 333 S. Broad St., Philadelphia.When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; closed Sunday. Through Dec. 4.Admission: Free.% Call: (215) 875-1116.PHILADELPHIA -- Contemporary society has an insatiable appetite for imagery. Designers working in a culture of appropriation must always be on the lookout for a fresh shape, line or pattern.That's one reason why I suspect "Czech Cubism," which will be on view at the University of the Arts in downtown Philadelphia through Dec. 4, will prove to be a very influential exhibition, especially after its showing in New York next spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2004
Diego Maria Rivera is remembered as one of the towering figures in the school of Mexican mural painters who helped forge a new national identity for their country after the revolution of 1910-20. In the 1920s, Rivera, along with such contemporaries as David Sequeiros and Jose Clemente Orozco, created large-scale public murals to enlist popular support for the new republican government's programs. In doing so, they married the venerable art of fresco painting with a highly expressive modernist language that embodied the revolutionary spirit of their times.
NEWS
June 7, 1999
Olivier Debre,79, one of France's best-known abstract painters of the post-war era, whose large-format works include the stage curtain at the Comedie Francaise, died in Paris on Tuesday. His form of art, which he described as "opposite to the geometric abstraction of the Cubism of Cezanne and Picasso," involved daring splashes of color applied with thick brush strokes intended to create a poetic and sensual mood.Ernie Wilkins,79, St. Louis-born composer and saxophonist who played with Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie and Lionel Hampton, died Saturday in Copenhagen, Denmark.
NEWS
By Edward J. Sozanski and Edward J. Sozanski,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
WASHINGTON - In the first dozen years of his career, Pablo Picasso traveled from the rigorous conservatism of the traditional painting academy to the radical verge of cubism. That's further than ordinary artists travel in a lifetime. But right from the beginning, Picasso demonstrated that he was anything but ordinary.By age 15, he could draw and paint as well as his father, who was an art teacher. A profile portrait of his mother in pastel that he executed at about that age demonstrates not only skill in capturing her likeness but sensitivity to mood, which one doesn't expect in a teen-ager.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 16, 1996
"The Face of America" at the Baltimore Museum of Art is maddening and exhilarating, frustrating and rewarding, cluttered with works and bursting with ideas. Like America itself, this show is big, sprawling and hard to get a handle on, but getting to know it is worth the trouble.Subtitled "Modernist Art 1910-1950," it's an attempt to show the many aspects of the modern movement in this country through use of the museum's extensive collection. Five curators were involved in putting it together, and it looks it, containing about 240 works that include paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, decorative arts and textiles.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 1995
The history of 20th century art can seem much too complicated and difficult to follow, with its confusing succession of isms: Cubism, futurism, surrealism, expressionism, etc. What's this all about, anyway?Well, there's no better way to understand art than to look at it, and the Baltimore Museum of Art is now offering an excellent opportunity to follow visually the art of the century's first half. Two new shows containing prints, drawings and photographs take us from the dawn of cubism to the threshold of abstract expressionism; those who want to cross the threshold need only visit the museum's modern wing to see how abstract expressionism developed from what went before it."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
The city's 12th annual ArtScape provided diverse visions for thousands who flocked yesterday to Baltimore's Mount Royal neighborhood -- and a bonanza for the MTA's light-rail system.All you needed to enjoy the day -- and the arts that ranged from the visual to the performing -- was an open mind and a good pair of walking shoes.tTC If you went by light rail, which runs through ArtScape's festivities, you had to have a little patience, as well. A record number of people took the often lightly used trains -- leading transit officials to extend today's riding hours.
FEATURES
By Thomas Hine and Thomas Hine,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 20, 1992
'Czech Cubism'Where: Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery of the University of the Arts, 333 S. Broad St., Philadelphia.When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; closed Sunday. Through Dec. 4.Admission: Free.% Call: (215) 875-1116.PHILADELPHIA -- Contemporary society has an insatiable appetite for imagery. Designers working in a culture of appropriation must always be on the lookout for a fresh shape, line or pattern.That's one reason why I suspect "Czech Cubism," which will be on view at the University of the Arts in downtown Philadelphia through Dec. 4, will prove to be a very influential exhibition, especially after its showing in New York next spring.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 22, 2001
Pablo Picasso was one of the greatest draftsmen of the 20th century, an artist whose instantly recognizable graphic style was familiar even to people who knew little about art. By the time he died, his revolutionary sense of design had so pervaded popular consciousness that knockoffs of his works adorned everything from book and jazz album covers to calendars and greeting cards. But Picasso (1881-1973) did not develop his unique manner all at once. Though he was a child prodigy whose talent was recognized early by his father, a provincial art teacher and painter, Picasso's earliest works reflected the traditional stylistic conventions of 19th-century academic art. Only after 1900, when he first settled in Paris as a penniless, struggling artist, did his highly personal style began to emerge.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 21, 1992
Philadelphia -- If one had to name the single most important episode in the long career of Pablo Picasso, it would probably be that brief period around 1910 when he and Georges Braque created the first phase of cubism (called analytical cubism), thereby revolutionizing modern art.The elements of cubism -- including abandonment of traditional perspective and illusion in favor of analysis of the object from several points of view at once, use of everyday materials, introduction of collage and constructed (rather than modeled or chiseled)
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | September 12, 1991
Amalie Rothschild has been an abstract artist for so many years that one simply does not expect a realistic representation of the human figure from her. When this Baltimore artist does render a figure it is likely to be as geometric forms brought together with mathematical precision: the geometry of the human body, if you will.That makes her "Artist and Model" series at the C. Grimaldis Gallery an interesting demonstration of how her recent return to figuration was very much done on her own abstraction-oriented terms.
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