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NEWS
March 29, 1992
13,712 cubic yards of concrete form the structural foundation of the stadium.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
The Maryland Port Administration is completing its initial review of a multimillion-dollar proposal that would turn Baltimore harbor shipping channel muck into bucks. The plan might eventually replace time-tested dredge disposal methods of piling sediment along the waterline or using it to plug holes in eroding bay islands with a factory that bakes the goo into concrete aggregate for construction. Baltimore would be the first port to use the process. "We're getting ready to take the next step and it's an important step for Maryland," said port commissioner Ted Venetoulis.
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NEWS
By Alan Wechsler and Alan Wechsler,ALBANY TIMES UNION | September 26, 2000
NORTHVILLE, N.Y. - To most users, the Great Sacandaga Lake is a place for recreation: Hundreds of camps line its shore, hundreds of boats ply its waters, while below the dam, people in rafts, tubes and kayaks cavort in the warm water released to the lower Sacandaga River. But the Sacandaga, by far the largest man-made lake in New York, was not built for fun. It was built to prevent flooding, and its creation drowned hundreds of farms and villages that had been in families for generations.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
Preparatory work on the long-planned dredging of Lake Elkhorn in Columbia is to begin in early October with the award of the dredging bid to a Chester, Pa., firm, according to an announcement from the Columbia Association. Mobile Dredging and Pumping Co. was chosen from among four finalists for the job that the announcement said would remove about 52,000 cubic yards of sediment from the 34-year-old lake, which has never been extensively dredged before. Several aspects of the job remained unclear, however.
NEWS
December 2, 1992
Public Works seeking permission to dredgeThe county Department of Public Works is seeking permission to dig a 2,000-foot navigation channel through the Magothy River's Old Man Creek and 30 spur channels to individual piers.The creek runs parallel to and between Riverdale Road and Tolstoy Lane.The 4,390 cubic yards of sand and mud removed from the main channel and the 7,037 cubic yards of material from the spurs will be pumped to a disposal site on Edwin Raynor Boulevard.That 11-acre site, leased to the county by Connie Frazier of Baltimore, also could accept material taken from Cattail Creek and the Upper Magothy River, where dredging projects also are being considered.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
Preparatory work on the long-planned dredging of Lake Elkhorn in Columbia is to begin in early October with the award of the dredging bid to a Chester, Pa., firm, according to an announcement from the Columbia Association. Mobile Dredging and Pumping Co. was chosen from among four finalists for the job that the announcement said would remove about 52,000 cubic yards of sediment from the 34-year-old lake, which has never been extensively dredged before. Several aspects of the job remained unclear, however.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
The state Board of Public Works has approved spending $1.6 million to haul dirt contaminated with toxic chromium from the Dundalk Marine Terminal.The board awarded a contract yesterday to Continental Vanguard of Bellmawr, N.J., to treat the terminal's hazardous soil and dispose of it in Michigan.About 3,000 cubic yards of chromium-contaminated dirt are stored illegally at the 570-acre terminal.The Maryland Port Administration, which runs the terminal, lacks state permits to store hazardous waste, and so is required to have it hauled away for disposal by a licensed contractor.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | April 26, 2009
The long-planned dredging of Lake Elkhorn, Columbia's largest of three man-made lakes, is expected to begin in late August. Diana Kelley, contract administrator for the Columbia Association, said timing of the work will allow the association's summer Nature Camp to be held at the pavilion near the Lake Elkhorn dam. The $5 million project, discussed and planned over the past five years, is to be followed next year by the $6 million dredging at Lake Kittamaqundi,...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
It looks like it was designed by someone visualizing alien landing strips instead of highway exit ramps.It is a Glen Burnie mountain with no name, containing 650,000 cubic yards -- give or take a few stones -- of reddish clay.It towers a good four stories above motorists heading south on Interstate 97 or east onto Route 100 who must have wondered just what the heck it is.Mostly, it is dirt the State Highway Administration has been importing from Baltimore, which is excavating a landfill on Hawkins Point, since last July.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
NEARLY A YEAR AGO, residents of southeast Baltimore County felt dismayed and betrayed when state officials announced they would dump an additional 30 million cubic yards of spoil dredged from Baltimore shipping channels on Hart-Miller Island.The state had little choice. The Port of Baltimore's survival depends on scooping up 4 million cubic yards of muck annually so ships can navigate its channels. With no immediate site alternatives, the state had to return to Hart-Miller as a short-term answer.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | April 26, 2009
The long-planned dredging of Lake Elkhorn, Columbia's largest of three man-made lakes, is expected to begin in late August. Diana Kelley, contract administrator for the Columbia Association, said timing of the work will allow the association's summer Nature Camp to be held at the pavilion near the Lake Elkhorn dam. The $5 million project, discussed and planned over the past five years, is to be followed next year by the $6 million dredging at Lake Kittamaqundi,...
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | December 19, 2006
A Baltimore County judge ordered yesterday the owners of the Sparrows Point shipyard to temporarily stop dredging in the Patapsco River. Circuit Court Judge Dana M. Levitz granted a temporary injunction to stop contractors from removing sediment in the river near the Key Bridge at the request of a group of Dundalk-area residents also opposed to a liquefied natural gas terminal planned for the site, according to a lawyer for the group. The Greater Dundalk Alliance's LNG opposition team alleges in its court filing that the dredging is stirring up toxins that will harm nearby residents and the Chesapeake Bay. The community group, however, must post a $750,000 bond by today to cover the company's revenue lost by not dredging, in the event that the contractors are allowed to resume the work.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,Sun reporter | October 4, 2006
The Columbia Association's plans to dredge Lakes Elkhorn and Kittamaqundi are raising more than just mud. Residents, such as Harvey Nathanson, of the Water's Edge community that overlooks Lake Kittamaqundi, are among those who want the lake dredged but have concerns about the project's effect on the community. "I'm in favor of them doing it - the lake needs to be dredged, and that is paramount," Nathanson said. "But, I'm not for them dumping that stuff at our side of the lake." Responding to overwhelming amounts of algae and sediment that threaten to turn the two manmade lakes into marshland if left untouched, the association board has approved $10 million to dredge Lakes Elkhorn and Kittamaqundi, with an engineering contract to be awarded in May. Lake Kittamaqundi was dredged in the 1980s; Elkhorn has never been dredged.
NEWS
By DAVE YOUNG AND ANTONIO RIERA | March 3, 2006
Though many workers, executives and political leaders in the United States and other industrialized nations see the advancing Chinese behemoth as an economic threat, perhaps they should view China as the West's new land of opportunity. According to Chinese news reports, vetted by the government, China expects to build more than 300 new cities over the next five years, bringing the total number of Chinese cities with populations over 200,000 to 1,000. By contrast, the United States has 125 or so. More remarkably, by 2010, less than five years from now, close to 200 Chinese cities will have populations of a million or more.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
This is what worries the federal government: If 31 inches of rain were to fall in 72 hours - an utterly unimaginable storm -the Loch Raven Dam in Baltimore County might give way, sending 23 billion gallons of water cascading downstream. Never mind that there is no record of anything approaching a deluge of that magnitude. The Federal Dam Safety Act says that local officials should be ready for it. So the Baltimore City Department of Public Works, which operates the reservoir, is in the midst of a $28.8 million project to make the 80-foot-high dam better prepared than Noah to withstand the great flood.
NEWS
By Robert Hanley and Robert Hanley,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 2003
STONE HARBOR, N.J. -- Pity the poor piping plover. The rare and fragile little shorebird, protected by federal law, has been caught in the middle of an expensive and nasty legal crossfire in this pleasant coastal town about 20 miles south of Atlantic City. On one side are town officials, boaters and many taxpayers. On the other are the U.S. attorney for New Jersey and two other federal agencies determined to protect nesting plovers on a barren peninsula at the southern tip of town. The issue involves tens of thousands of cubic yards of sediment that the town dredged from six bays here in late 2001 and early 2002 and pumped to the peninsula.
NEWS
July 5, 2000
THE SEARCH for ways to dispose of mud dredged from the port of Baltimore's shipping channels grew more difficult last week when Gov. Parris N. Glendening slammed the door on future dumping at open-water sites in the Chesapeake Bay. It was a sound decision, based on scientific findings by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers of trace amounts of toxins in dredged material. That came as a surprise, since similar tests by the corps in 1998 and 1999 had found no such dangers. This ends the bitter debate over dumping material overboard at a site north of the bay bridge known as the Kent Narrows Deep, or Site 104. But whatever new location is finally chosen by state officials will stir controversies.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
This is a story of determination and dirt -- 100,000 cubic yards of it.It begins more than two years ago in a neighborhood alongside Route 32 in Columbia's River Hill village, where Karen Bellamy has a house that is satisfyingly suburban in every way except one: She can hear the constant rumble of speeding cars and 18-wheeler trucks on the four-lane highway just across Morning Time Lane.When the State Highway Administration said it wasn't responsible -- and wouldn't pay for sound walls or dirt for an earth berm to help mitigate the noise -- Bellamy decided to take the matter up herself.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 16, 2002
REFUSEWISE, it has been an interesting month in Baltimore. Ever since the first of the month when the Department of Public Works changed the way it picks up recyclables-mainly stacks of newspapers and "blue bags" containing plastic and glass - street life in this town has taken on a fresh excitement. A lot of criticism has been voiced about the new program, which calls for residents to put their recyclables in the front of houses, not in the alleys, and changes the pickup schedule. As a fan of alleys, I too railed against the change in a column several weeks ago. But after watching the program in action for the past few weeks, I now can say a few positive things about it. First of all, dogs love it. On "blue bag" recycling day when bags are placed on city sidewalks, city dogs are having a field day as they walk their appointed rounds.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2001
POPLAR ISLAND - Two miles out in the bay, 34 miles southeast of Baltimore near Tilghman Island, excavators and dump trucks with tires as tall as a person are sculpting a mountain of muck and sand dredged from the port of Baltimore's shipping channels. If the complex engineering proves correct - if the Maryland Port Administration, the Army Corps of Engineers and federal and state environmental agencies can carry through with a plan to mimic the natural world - this nearly extinct island will emerge over the next decade as an 1,100- acre wildlife preserve.
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