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NEWS
By GARY MARX and GARY MARX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 17, 2005
HAVANA -- The number of Cubans leaving their homeland by sea has increased sharply in the past year and led to several high-profile deaths in the Florida Straits. U.S. authorities said that 2,504 Cubans have been intercepted at sea so far in 2005, up from 1,499 in all of 2004. The number of Cuban migrants reaching South Florida by sea also increased during the 12 months ended Sept. 20 to 2,530 from 954 during the previous year. "There are any number of reasons why people want to come to the U.S. They are looking for opportunity," said Steve McDonald, assistant chief patrol agent with the U.S. Border Patrol.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- The Orioles have signed Cuban right-hander Lazaro Leyva to an international free-agent contract, according to an industry source. The deal is pending a physical and age verification, the latter of which could take weeks. Leyva received a $725,000 signing bonus, according to CBS Sports, which first reported the deal. The 20-year-old is the third Cuban player the Orioles have signed under executive vice president Dan Duquette. They signed outfielder Henry Urrutia to a $778,500 bonus in 2012 and inked outfielder Dariel Alvarez to an $800,000 bonus last year.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 2001
MIAMI - Despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last week that immigrants can't be held in prison indefinitely, 500 Cuban felons who have completed their U.S. sentences but are still behind bars remain in limbo, their fate yet to be determined by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Immigration attorneys say the ruling means that the INS must either deport the prisoners - which appears to be impossible, because Cuba won't accept them - or release them. But the INS is still studying the ruling and will take its time before acting.
NEWS
Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Football season is upon us, and with it, tailgates. This year, think outside the traditional burger-and-dog grilling session with Bird's Nest Barbecue owner Tim Brown's gooey Cuban sandwiches, served Maryland-style, with pit ham and pulled pork.  Brown piles sourdough bread high with Swiss cheese, pickles, spicy mustard and, of course, pit ham and pulled pork butt, grilling the sandwiches until they are warm, messy and delicious - perfect fuel...
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | February 4, 1998
ONE can only cry so much about Cuba's sorry condition after 39 years of Communist dictatorship. Crumbling buildings, prostitution running rampant -- not even in dictator Fulgencio Batista's day was it that bad.Here I was watching television, staring at the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a huge mural that the Communist government placed into Havana's Plaza de la Revolucion for the pope's Sunday Mass, and crying.Here I was watching a frail-looking but forceful pope calling for political pluralism and human rights for Cuba.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | September 24, 1991
MOSCOW -- As the tide of communism recedes from the Soviet Union, six Cubans find themselves in a bizarre position -- hiding in Moscow to avoid returning to the island."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 18, 2005
MIAMI -- The number of Cubans intercepted at sea while trying to reach the United States is at its highest level since tens of thousands took to the Florida Straits on makeshift rafts and in small boats in the 1994 exodus sanctioned by President Fidel Castro. The sharp rise and an increase in clashes between would-be immigrants and the Coast Guard are inflaming tensions over a policy enacted in response to the 1994 migration that allows Cubans without visas to stay if they reach American soil but turns back those caught at sea. The "wet foot, dry foot" policy, which does not apply to any other immigrant group, is being blamed by critics for at least 39 deaths this year in the Florida Straits and is testing the resolve of the Coast Guard, which the critics say has become too aggressive in enforcing the restrictions.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | May 12, 1999
I ARRIVED at the Maryland Taxpayers' Baseball Stadium -- erroneously named Oriole Park at Camden Yards -- just before 9 the night of May 3. The game between Cuba and the worst baseball team in the free world -- otherwise known as the Baltimore Orioles -- should have been nearly 90 minutes old.But the tarps were on the field. The game was in rain delay. Cuban music wafted throughout the stadium and the Cubans, scattered throughout Oriole Park but mostly concentrated behind the Cuban players' dugout, rocked to the beat.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 30, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Perhaps we should be grateful Fidel Castro won't permit Cubans to play in the majors. These guys make those nightly American League marathons look like sprints.Some teams panic when they get down 5-0 in the first inning. The Cubans take a siesta, rousing themselves only to try another pickoff throw or tie another shoelace.What's the hurry when you can drive the opponent crazy?Last night, Cuba spotted the U.S. Olympic team the aforementioned five runs, then crawled back to win, 9-6. The game lasted four hours, ending at 1 a.m. Barcelona time.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
As a member of Arundel High School's baseball team that was voted No. 1 in the nation this spring, pitcher Brandon Agamennone isn't accustomed to entering a game he doesn't believe he can win.Even when he's wearing the Mayo American Legion Post 226 uniform, that feeling doesn't change -- no matter the competition.Agamennone's confidence is being put to the test this week, when Mayo takes on the Cuban Junior National 18-and-under baseball team at Joe Cannon Stadium in Harmans.The game, scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, kicks off the Cuban squad's first-ever tour of the U.S.Considered by many people to be the best 18-and-under baseball team in the world, the Cubans also will visit Washington and Connecticut before making an appearance in the World Youth Championships in Windsor, Ontario.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
What do you do when the small speedboat you're using to escape illegally from Cuba runs out of fuel partway through the Gulf of Mexico? The vessel rocks uncomfortably atop large waves. You haven't eaten in days. You know what could happen if you're caught. You fear the worst. "The first thought was, 'Wow, I went through so much just to die on the edge,'" Dariel Alvarez, 25, recalled recently in Spanish. "I was scared to come so far and fall short. " Two years later, the Triple-A Norfolk outfielder is one of the Orioles' rising position prospects, combining a steady glove in the outfield with an electrifying plate presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
I can't believe how much talk about the Texas border crisis I've heard on cable news the last two weeks without any mention of the Mariel boatlift of 1980. This is textbook for what I mean about TV news -- from the network and cable level on down -- being hopelessly short on context and any sense of even recent American history. No wonder we are such an addled nation that thinks everything that comes along is the biggest, newest, baddest or best thing ever. No wonder we are such an easily confused and jangled bunch.
NEWS
By Fred L. Pincus | May 29, 2014
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban's controversial comments about walking across the street if he saw a young black man wearing a hoodie coming toward him late at night got me to thinking about an experience I had 30 years ago. One night while walking from my Charles Village home to my car, I noticed two young black men walking toward me. It was very dark since the street light had blown out. Should I cross the street? I asked myself, concluding that such a move would be racist since they had just as much right to the sidewalk as I did. I continued walking.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
Whatever the outcome in Ukraine, I'll bet most Americans want us to keep hands off. I'm sorry for everyone in that beleaguered country, but dragging the United States into a military confrontation with Russia would be reckless ( "Obama, Kerry condemn Russian 'aggression' in Ukraine as U.S. readies aid," March 4). Right now, it looks like President Barack Obama is the only one standing up to President Vladimir Putin. Instead, I think we should "lead from behind" since the Ukraine conflict is in Europe's neighborhood, not ours.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The Orioles plan to scout highly touted Cuban outfielder Rusney Castillo, who had previously been one of Cuba's top players before recently defecting from that country, on Saturday in the Dominican Republic, according to an industry source. Castillo, 26, played in Cuba's top professional league, Serie Nacional, for the past five seasons, hitting .319/.383/.516 with 51 homers and 226 RBIs in 360 games over that span. During the 2010-2011 season, Castillo hit a career-high 22 homers and had 95 RBIs and 32 stolen bases in 104 games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
It's been a busy three years for Marta Ines Quintana, owner of Towson's Havana Road. There's her thriving catering business, a line of fully prepared packaged dinners Quintana developed for supermarket sales, and a cookbook and television show - both are works in progress that will showcase traditional Cuban restaurants as well as Quintana's contemporary spins on them. You might think all of that would distract Quintana from the restaurant itself - a bright spot on a drab Pennsylvania Avenue dining strip.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- They arrive here almost daily now -- thin, sun-stricken, in shock from both the voyage and the realization that they have survived.Palms upturned, Sixto de la Riva Linares shows the open blisters he got from two days of rowing. "We felt like it would never end," he said. "But hope was the last thing we wanted to lose."Refugees from Cuba are rafting across the Florida Straits in record numbers. The Coast Guard has picked up or assisted 295 Cubans so far in April, including 52 Friday, and 1,401 since the first of the year.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Nelson Schwartz and Mark Matthews and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | August 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Coast Guard began ferrying hundreds of Cubans from the Florida Straits to the Guantanamo Naval Base in Cuba yesterday after President Clinton withdrew a three-decade-old U.S. welcome mat for boat people fleeing the Castro dictatorship.Mr. Clinton said at a news conference that he would not let Fidel Castro set U.S. immigration policy by trying to "export to the United States the political and economic crisis he has created in Cuba."He rejected the possibility of a diplomatic overture to Mr. Castro or easing the 30-year-old U.S. economic embargo, which, combined with the cutoff of billions of dollars in subsidies since the collapse of the Soviet Union, is grinding down the Cuban economy.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
The Orioles' roster will be shuffling before they open the second half of the season tonight in Texas, and all signs point to left fielder Nolan Reimold heading to the 15-day disabled list . Reimold was not with the team for its workout in Texas on Thursday. And Reimold's injury apparently has nothing to do with the lingering right hamstring injury that put him on the DL for more than seven weeks this season, but is a reoccurrence of last year's neck pain that forced him to miss all but 16 games of a promising 2012 campaign.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
BOWIE - On his first off day as an Orioles minor leaguer, Double-A Bowie outfielder Henry Urrutia took a trip to Baltimore, where he got a tour of Camden Yards - the place he hopes his uphill and divot-filled baseball journey reaches its pinnacle. Thursday, Urrutia checked out the Orioles clubhouse, strolled up the steps of the home dugout and walked onto the field, where he took a 360-degree look around him and soaked in what seemed impossible growing up in Cuba. It was a memorable trip for the 26-year-old Urrutia - because it was the truest sign yet that his dream of playing in the big leagues was in reach.
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