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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | February 13, 2013
Cuban Revolution Restaurant and Jazz Bar (1903 Ashland Ave., 443-708-5184, thecubanrevolution.com) has opened in a neighborhood not famous for its restaurants. Known officially as Middle East, the area, which includes the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, is being developed as a mixed-use life-science campus by the Forest City-New East Baltimore Partnership. Cuban Revolution, which opened on Feb. 13, is the first new restaurant for the still emerging district. “We're used to that,” said Ed Morabito, who opened the original Cuban Revolution in Providence, R.I. with his wife, Mary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 12, 2013
Cuban Revolution has come to Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood. Just a few blocks away from the Johns Hopkins Hospital , the Middle East area has seldom officered any reason for outsiders to wander in. That is changing. The neighborhood is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 12, 2013
Cuban Revolution has come to Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood. Just a few blocks away from the Johns Hopkins Hospital , the Middle East area has seldom officered any reason for outsiders to wander in. That is changing. The neighborhood is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2013
A Cuban Revolution has come to East Baltimore. The city's Middle East neighborhood is just a few blocks away from Johns Hopkins Hospital, but there was seldom any reason for outsiders to wander in. That has changed. Amid protests from some longtime residents and others, most homeowners in the area were relocated and their houses — along with many that were abandoned and dilapidated — were torn down. Now Middle East is being developed as a mixed-use life science campus. The anchor tenant is the Science & Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, but the 80-acre area will include other research facilities along with new housing, parking and a six-acre central park.
NEWS
By Catharine Allen and Catharine Allen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 1998
MEXICO CITY -- When Cuauhtemoc Cardenas took control of the Mexico City government last month, crowds packed the downtown streets, trying to touch, talk to or at least get a glimpse of the new mayor. Jubilant citizens swarmed so close that Cardenas, who had planned to make the ceremonial trip to his new offices on foot, had to give up and duck into a car.Also out in droves were Mexico City street vendors, hawking banners and hats with the insignia of Cardenas' party, but also pins, posters and T-shirts honoring a man who was not even Mexican -- Ernesto "Che" Guevara, the Argentine guerrilla who was a leader of the Cuban revolution.
NEWS
By Victor Alvarez and Victor Alvarez,Contributing Writer | March 4, 1993
Before Julian Domenech became headmaster of the Severn School, the native Cuban witnessed the rise of Fidel Castro.Tonight at the school, "Man of LaMancha" will be performed with an altered script influenced by the Cuban revolution.The play, a condensation of Cervantes' "Don Quixote," deals with a man combating disorder and dishonesty in a world of realism, where the dent he makes is small.Mr. Domenech, who escaped to the United States 30 years ago, developed the idea of transforming the play last summer with the director, Eric Van DeVort, a faculty member.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
HAVANA, Cuba -- Warning of what it described as a campaign by the United States to "deceive, confuse and dismantle" the Cuban revolution, the Cuban Communist Party has called for greater ideological and economic orthodoxy, threatening "severe punishment" for those who fail to comply.Party leaders also sharply criticized features of the limited opening of the economy in the last three years that has rescued the Cuban economy from the brink of collapse, demanding increased self-reliance and discipline instead.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Sister Mary Carmen Deschapelles, an Oblate Sister of Providence and retired parochial school educator, died Dec. 29 of heart failure at Future Care Nursing Home at North Point. She was 86. Caridad Maria Deschapelles Cassio was born and raised in Cardenas, Cuba. She was a graduate of St. Jose High School in Cardenas and earned a bachelor's degree from Cardenas Institute. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1944 and professed her vows in 1947, taking the name Sister Mary Carmen.
NEWS
By WILLIAM I. ROBINSON | May 16, 1993
Havana.-- While the Clinton administration grapples with foreign policy challenges in ex-Yugoslavia, the Middle East and Russia, a policy shift is quietly under way in a country much closer to home, and much more susceptible to the passions of the Washington political establishment -- Cuba.This shift is apparent in a series of recent reports issued by virtually every important policy planning center and think tank "inside the Beltway" -- from the Rand Corporation to Inter-American Dialogue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Mary Patricia Castillo, a homemaker who was a financial supporter of Osher Lifetime Learning at the Johns Hopkins University, died in her sleep Wednesday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 99. Mary Patricia Willis, who never used her first name, was born and spent her early years in Chesapeake City. She later moved to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1928 from Eastern High School. She then studied fashion design at the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 1945, she married Cuban-born Eugenio Castillo y Borges, who had been Cuban consul general in Baltimore since 1938.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Sister Mary Carmen Deschapelles, an Oblate Sister of Providence and retired parochial school educator, died Dec. 29 of heart failure at Future Care Nursing Home at North Point. She was 86. Caridad Maria Deschapelles Cassio was born and raised in Cardenas, Cuba. She was a graduate of St. Jose High School in Cardenas and earned a bachelor's degree from Cardenas Institute. She entered the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1944 and professed her vows in 1947, taking the name Sister Mary Carmen.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Mary Patricia Castillo, a homemaker who was a financial supporter of Osher Lifetime Learning at the Johns Hopkins University, died in her sleep Wednesday at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. She was 99. Mary Patricia Willis, who never used her first name, was born and spent her early years in Chesapeake City. She later moved to Baltimore, where she graduated in 1928 from Eastern High School. She then studied fashion design at the Maryland Institute College of Art. In 1945, she married Cuban-born Eugenio Castillo y Borges, who had been Cuban consul general in Baltimore since 1938.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun Staff | April 1, 2007
Havana -- To look at her meager two-room house that doubles as a storefront souvenir shop, it may not seem that Vivian Madrigal Ponjuan has a lot in life. But she says she is fortunate because she has a roof that doesn't leak, running water and a refrigerator full of food. The fact that she has a warm place to sleep is a gift of the revolution more than 40 years ago that put Fidel Castro in power, she said. Life before the revolution was hard for her family, who, like many blacks, lived in extreme poverty.
NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2004
Harford County resident Patricia A. Bosse was drawn to Cuba. Perhaps it was because she was born the same month and year as the Cuban Revolution - January 1959. Or that the papers she had written during her college years about Ernest Hemingway's life in San Francisco dePaula sparked her interest. Regardless, she hoped to go there one day. Shortly before Bosse's 45th birthday, she got her wish. On Jan. 5, Bosse and a dozen others from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland's international study program boarded a charter plane bound for Havana as part of a two-week study.
TOPIC
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
TRINIDAD, Cuba - Ernesto "Che" Guevara, almost luminous in his revolutionary zeal, stares from the gift shop at the sprawling and swanky Hotel Trinidad Del Mar, about 180 miles southeast of Havana. European vacationers, middle-aged, well-fed and sunburned, choose from the Che 2002 calendars and posters, bearing the iconic photo of the Argentine-born hero of the Cuban revolution. There are also Che T-shirts, Che lapel pins, Che refrigerator magnets and Che cigar cases. His writings and biographies, arranged neatly on a stand, sit unopened.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 8, 2000
It's difficult to view the photographs of Alberto Korda and Jose Figueroa at C. Grimaldis Gallery outside the context of the Cuban revolution and its aftermath. Korda was for many years a sort of official photographer of the revolution and a privileged member of Cuban leader Fidel Castro's personal entourage. The photographs he took of the Cuban leader and his associates during the first years after the revolution are masterful propaganda; in them, the benevolent dictator presides over the grateful masses.
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