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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Gilbert A. Lewthwaite contributed to this article | May 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration announced yesterday that it would allow about 15,000 Cuban refugees now at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo, Cuba, to enter the United States, a move that officials insisted last year would never happen.The reversal stemmed from the mounting costs of detaining the Cubans, the prospect that increasing numbers of Cubans would flee their homeland accompanied by small children, and fears of violence among the mostly young men who faced a bleak future at the camp, officials said.
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NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 16, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The Coast Guard rounded up six Cuban refugees off Tavernier, Fla., yesterday after spending more than two hours trying to persuade two of the men to turn themselves in. The scene was reminiscent of a struggle by four other Cubans who were intercepted off Key Largo last week. After one of those men was taken into custody by the Coast Guard, the other three eluded efforts to apprehend them long enough to swim two miles to shore - giving them the opportunity to become permanent residents of the United States.
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NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 16, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The Coast Guard rounded up six Cuban refugees off Tavernier, Fla., yesterday after spending more than two hours trying to persuade two of the men to turn themselves in. The scene was reminiscent of a struggle by four other Cubans who were intercepted off Key Largo last week. After one of those men was taken into custody by the Coast Guard, the other three eluded efforts to apprehend them long enough to swim two miles to shore - giving them the opportunity to become permanent residents of the United States.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 30, 2000
AWEEK AGO, federal agents swooped into that bastion of anti-communist fanaticism -- better known as the home of Lazaro Gonzalez -- rescued Elian Gonzalez and reunited him with his father. That is as it should be. Now, federal officials can do something else: Get the boy and his father out of here. Immediately. Today. Yesterday couldn't have been quick enough. It's time Americans weary of the Elian Gonzalez saga spoke up. Had saner heads prevailed, the boy would have been returned to his father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, within days of his rescue from an inner tube off the Florida shore.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 13, 1993
KEY WEST, Fla. -- For love or money -- or a commitment to Fidel Castro's demise -- an unseemly mix of people have combined to bring Cuban refugees to the United States at a time when record numbers are fleeing their troubled homeland."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | October 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It was the biggest crisis of Bill Clinton's first term and the most violent of his career:Hundreds of angry Cuban refugees, breaking out of Arkansas's sprawling Fort Chaffee army reservation in 1980, attacked state police and National Guardsmen with broken pieces of sidewalk and even live snakes before being driven back inside by batons and buckshot, where full-scale rioting and burning ensued.Vastly outnumbered police, meanwhile, kept a worried watch on an inflamed local populace ready to defend family and property with all the guns and ammunition at hand.
NEWS
By VIRGINIA I. POSTREL | October 4, 1994
''You just can't grasp what it's like to live your life with someone telling you where you can or can't go -- what it's like not to have the simple freedom to do what you want, when you want, to go wherever you want. I'm 37 years old, and I grew up knowing nothing but East Germany and knowing I would never know anything else of the world. When I stood in front of the Wall that night, I cried like a baby. I couldn't stop. My dream, my real fantasy, is to go to America. I want to water-ski in Florida.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 20, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- Jose Ramon Ortega and his family got off their raft of three tire tubes, four pieces of two-by-four, a sheet of plywood, all held together by a knotted rope, just in time to hear President Clinton say there would be no more like them.With his wife, three stepsons, a stepdaughter and his pet dog, Honey, the 52-year-old truck driver was among the last group of Cuban refugees automatically allowed into the United States.No sooner were they admitted yesterday, than Mr. Clinton closed the door that had been open to Cuban refugees like them for almost 30 years under a 1966 law.His face scorched by two days on the water, Mr. Ortega, a wiry figure in a newly acquired T-shirt emblazoned "Las Vegas -- Gambling Capital of the World," listened at the Cuban Refugee Center here to Mr. Clinton announce on television that Cubans would now be processed like other refugees.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 30, 2000
AWEEK AGO, federal agents swooped into that bastion of anti-communist fanaticism -- better known as the home of Lazaro Gonzalez -- rescued Elian Gonzalez and reunited him with his father. That is as it should be. Now, federal officials can do something else: Get the boy and his father out of here. Immediately. Today. Yesterday couldn't have been quick enough. It's time Americans weary of the Elian Gonzalez saga spoke up. Had saner heads prevailed, the boy would have been returned to his father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, within days of his rescue from an inner tube off the Florida shore.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1994
Beneath the grand marble hall of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, student Raymond Stein has created a shrine to the desperate struggles of Cuban refugees.His installation shows an empty rowboat balanced sideways against a dark mural of two visions of the Virgen de la Caridad, the patron protector of Cuban sailors and rafters. A huge cluster of painted bananas dominates another wall. Fellow senior Michael Loveland, who shares the basement gallery space, has assembled metal parts reminiscent of an airplane fuselage.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Gilbert A. Lewthwaite contributed to this article | May 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration announced yesterday that it would allow about 15,000 Cuban refugees now at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo, Cuba, to enter the United States, a move that officials insisted last year would never happen.The reversal stemmed from the mounting costs of detaining the Cubans, the prospect that increasing numbers of Cubans would flee their homeland accompanied by small children, and fears of violence among the mostly young men who faced a bleak future at the camp, officials said.
NEWS
By VIRGINIA I. POSTREL | October 4, 1994
''You just can't grasp what it's like to live your life with someone telling you where you can or can't go -- what it's like not to have the simple freedom to do what you want, when you want, to go wherever you want. I'm 37 years old, and I grew up knowing nothing but East Germany and knowing I would never know anything else of the world. When I stood in front of the Wall that night, I cried like a baby. I couldn't stop. My dream, my real fantasy, is to go to America. I want to water-ski in Florida.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1994
Beneath the grand marble hall of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, student Raymond Stein has created a shrine to the desperate struggles of Cuban refugees.His installation shows an empty rowboat balanced sideways against a dark mural of two visions of the Virgen de la Caridad, the patron protector of Cuban sailors and rafters. A huge cluster of painted bananas dominates another wall. Fellow senior Michael Loveland, who shares the basement gallery space, has assembled metal parts reminiscent of an airplane fuselage.
NEWS
By WAYNE S. SMITH | August 31, 1994
Washington -- U.S. Administrations trying to deal with Cuba are reminiscent of nothing as much as a man long accustomed to driving nails when suddenly presented with something so subtle as the principle of the screw: He just keeps banging away with his hammer. The Clinton administration is as bad as its predecessors.Had the administration talked quietly with Cuban authorities weeks ago, it might have defused the increasing immigration problem by agreeing to such measures as the expansion of legal means of immigration and halting the practice of accepting without question any undocumented Cuban who arrived in the United States.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 22, 1994
MIAMI -- Between the bags of beans, rice and plantains in the small La Bodega supermarket in Miami's "Little Havana," you'll find Cuban-Americans split over President Clinton's decision to block the boat people from landing here, to end family reunion visits and cut off money transfers.To J. L. Correa, retired former owner of the store in southwest Miami, Mr. Clinton has made a "big mistake" in closing the door to Cubans.A poll in the Spanish-language editions of the Miami Herald yesterday suggested that 62 percent of Cuban-Americans opposed the decision to detain the boat people at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 20, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- Jose Ramon Ortega and his family got off their raft of three tire tubes, four pieces of two-by-four, a sheet of plywood, all held together by a knotted rope, just in time to hear President Clinton say there would be no more like them.With his wife, three stepsons, a stepdaughter and his pet dog, Honey, the 52-year-old truck driver was among the last group of Cuban refugees automatically allowed into the United States.No sooner were they admitted yesterday, than Mr. Clinton closed the door that had been open to Cuban refugees like them for almost 30 years under a 1966 law.His face scorched by two days on the water, Mr. Ortega, a wiry figure in a newly acquired T-shirt emblazoned "Las Vegas -- Gambling Capital of the World," listened at the Cuban Refugee Center here to Mr. Clinton announce on television that Cubans would now be processed like other refugees.
NEWS
By WAYNE S. SMITH | August 31, 1994
Washington -- U.S. Administrations trying to deal with Cuba are reminiscent of nothing as much as a man long accustomed to driving nails when suddenly presented with something so subtle as the principle of the screw: He just keeps banging away with his hammer. The Clinton administration is as bad as its predecessors.Had the administration talked quietly with Cuban authorities weeks ago, it might have defused the increasing immigration problem by agreeing to such measures as the expansion of legal means of immigration and halting the practice of accepting without question any undocumented Cuban who arrived in the United States.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 22, 1994
MIAMI -- Between the bags of beans, rice and plantains in the small La Bodega supermarket in Miami's "Little Havana," you'll find Cuban-Americans split over President Clinton's decision to block the boat people from landing here, to end family reunion visits and cut off money transfers.To J. L. Correa, retired former owner of the store in southwest Miami, Mr. Clinton has made a "big mistake" in closing the door to Cubans.A poll in the Spanish-language editions of the Miami Herald yesterday suggested that 62 percent of Cuban-Americans opposed the decision to detain the boat people at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | October 13, 1993
KEY WEST, Fla. -- For love or money -- or a commitment to Fidel Castro's demise -- an unseemly mix of people have combined to bring Cuban refugees to the United States at a time when record numbers are fleeing their troubled homeland."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 31, 1992
MIAMI -- Forty-five Cubans who defected to the United State in an airliner have been released from federal custody after an intense debate in Washington about whether the pilot's diversion of a routine domestic commuter flight violated international hijacking agreements.The Aero-Caribbean airliner landed at Miami International Airport Tuesday after passengers overpowered three crew members during a scheduled flight from Havana to the beach resort of Varadero. The plane's pilot, Carlos Cancio Porcel, was a leader in the defection plan.
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