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NEWS
February 5, 2007
Expectations in Miami and Washington had been that once Fidel Castro disappeared from the scene, the Revolution would crumble. But that, of course, has not been the case. Six months after Fidel passed the baton to Raul, there has been no sign whatever of unrest. The Cuban people have accepted the transition with calm maturity - indicating a higher level of support for the Revolution than the exiles in Miami or the Bush administration had thought possible. Indeed, a recent Gallup poll conducted in Cuba indicated that 49 percent of the Cuban people supported Fidel Castro.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- When the Orioles made the unprecedented move to play the Cuban national team in Havana on March 28, 1999, the stated purpose was to improve relations between the countries through a sporting exhibition. There was no way of knowing that 14 years later a young Cuban fan in the stands that afternoon would be wearing an Orioles uniform and preparing to play at their spring training complex. Wednesday, 26-year-old outfielder and Cuban defector Henry Urrutia made his first public statements about receiving his work visa - after spending a total of 18 months in the Dominican Republic and Haiti - and finally joining the organization that gave him a $778,500 signing bonus last July.
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NEWS
March 12, 2011
Baltimore is fortunate to be one of eight new cities added to the list of those airports able to serve travelers to Cuba ("BWI eligible to provide charter flights to Cuba," March 9). Under current rules, Cuban-Americans, religious delegations, academics, researchers and business people seeking to sell agriculture products can travel to Cuba, and they will now be able to use Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport for their departures. Baltimore's status would be threatened, however, by an amendment written by Florida's Senator Marco Rubio and New Jersey's Senator Bob Menendez to prevent all new airports from serving the Cuban market because these senators oppose engagement between the United States and Cuba.
NEWS
March 12, 2011
Baltimore is fortunate to be one of eight new cities added to the list of those airports able to serve travelers to Cuba ("BWI eligible to provide charter flights to Cuba," March 9). Under current rules, Cuban-Americans, religious delegations, academics, researchers and business people seeking to sell agriculture products can travel to Cuba, and they will now be able to use Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport for their departures. Baltimore's status would be threatened, however, by an amendment written by Florida's Senator Marco Rubio and New Jersey's Senator Bob Menendez to prevent all new airports from serving the Cuban market because these senators oppose engagement between the United States and Cuba.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 8, 2000
It's difficult to view the photographs of Alberto Korda and Jose Figueroa at C. Grimaldis Gallery outside the context of the Cuban revolution and its aftermath. Korda was for many years a sort of official photographer of the revolution and a privileged member of Cuban leader Fidel Castro's personal entourage. The photographs he took of the Cuban leader and his associates during the first years after the revolution are masterful propaganda; in them, the benevolent dictator presides over the grateful masses.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | September 2, 1994
HAVANA -- The new U.S. economic sanctions aimed at bludgeoning President Fidel Castro will end up battering ordinary Cubans much more than the country's Communist leader, diplomats and Havana residents say.In an effort to deprive the Castro government of dollars at a time when the Cuban economy is in ruin, the Clinton administration last week banned Cuban-Americans from sending money to relatives here or bringing cash to them during visits to Havana.The...
NEWS
By Steve Ruggeri | February 19, 1998
RECENT POLLS have indicated the average U.S. citizen is woefully lacking in a fundamental grasp of American history.In an exercise to raise and challenge our history intelligence, ponder what these figures have in common: Clara Barton (founder of the American Red Cross), Tom Mix (silent film cowboy), Gen. Robert E. Lee's nephew Fitzhugh Lee, Theodore Roosevelt, Stephen Crane (author of "The Red Badge of Courage"), Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, Gen. Wesley Merrit, Confederate Gen. "Fightin' " Joe Wheeler, Gen. "Pecos Bill" Shafter, Gen. Nelson Miles, Adm. George Dewey, William Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, Frederick Remington, Edgar Rice Burroughs (wrote "Tarzan of the Apes")
NEWS
May 30, 1995
U.S. embargo hurts Cubans without causeIt is a great puzzle to me why the United States of America, a great country and supposedly world leader, chooses to persecute the peoples of Cuba.A tight trade embargo in addition to business and travel restrictions impose severe hardships on that country in an attempt to topple its government and depose Fidel Castro.Why all this, when the tiny country presents no possible military, economic or political threat to the U.S.? Yet our government continues to harass Cuba with a fanatic and unexplainable fervor.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
A Memorable Place Getting to know a tropical neighbor By Charles A. Borek SPECIAL TO THE SUN My wife and I spent the great blizzard of 2003 in tropical splendor, enveloped by ocean breezes and welcomed by the local population, both of which were warm and inviting. Isla Grande, situated in the Greater Antilles, boasts an accessible, cosmopolitan urban area, complete with cultural diversions, stunning architecture and an art gallery of the highest order. Nearby are golden beaches, peaceful mountain retreats and hillsides sprinkled with towering royal palms.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | September 21, 1990
Miami -- THE CHAMPAGNE is on ice here. The Cuban community in exile is in no doubt that the aging Fidel Castro, erstwhile revolutionary guerrilla of the Sierra Maestra, scourge of John F. Kennedy, sower of discontent in the Andean peaks, tail-wagger of the Soviet Union and last surviving caudillo of Latin America, finally is in sight of his come-uppance.No man is an island, not even in the lush and potentially self-sufficient Caribbean. Mr. Castro cannot survive without a financial and political mentor and protector in Moscow.
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Expectations in Miami and Washington had been that once Fidel Castro disappeared from the scene, the Revolution would crumble. But that, of course, has not been the case. Six months after Fidel passed the baton to Raul, there has been no sign whatever of unrest. The Cuban people have accepted the transition with calm maturity - indicating a higher level of support for the Revolution than the exiles in Miami or the Bush administration had thought possible. Indeed, a recent Gallup poll conducted in Cuba indicated that 49 percent of the Cuban people supported Fidel Castro.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
A Memorable Place Getting to know a tropical neighbor By Charles A. Borek SPECIAL TO THE SUN My wife and I spent the great blizzard of 2003 in tropical splendor, enveloped by ocean breezes and welcomed by the local population, both of which were warm and inviting. Isla Grande, situated in the Greater Antilles, boasts an accessible, cosmopolitan urban area, complete with cultural diversions, stunning architecture and an art gallery of the highest order. Nearby are golden beaches, peaceful mountain retreats and hillsides sprinkled with towering royal palms.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 8, 2000
It's difficult to view the photographs of Alberto Korda and Jose Figueroa at C. Grimaldis Gallery outside the context of the Cuban revolution and its aftermath. Korda was for many years a sort of official photographer of the revolution and a privileged member of Cuban leader Fidel Castro's personal entourage. The photographs he took of the Cuban leader and his associates during the first years after the revolution are masterful propaganda; in them, the benevolent dictator presides over the grateful masses.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 31, 1999
The sight of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro sitting between Orioles owner Peter Angelos and baseball commissioner Bud Selig was chilling.The 50,000 tickets that went to the Friends of Fidel and not the true baseball fans of Cuba, disheartening.The discomfort experienced by Orioles minor-leaguer Julio Vinas, the son of Cuban refugees, unsettling.The Cuba trip wasn't perfect. It was never going to be perfect. But whatever the motives on both sides, it still must be considered a success.A people-to-people exchange, that's what Angelos wanted.
NEWS
January 21, 1999
CONGRATULATIONS to Peter Angelos. He has overcome such hurdles barring exhibition games between the Orioles and the Cuban national team as what dates and which bats to use.The main remaining snag -- how to use the proceeds in a manner consistent with the U.S. economic boycott of the Castro regime -- should be overcome on the terms the Cuban authorities suggest. Hurricane relief in Central America sounds fine. The State Department should accede to that. These games should be played.Baseball is big in Cuba.
NEWS
By Steve Ruggeri | February 19, 1998
RECENT POLLS have indicated the average U.S. citizen is woefully lacking in a fundamental grasp of American history.In an exercise to raise and challenge our history intelligence, ponder what these figures have in common: Clara Barton (founder of the American Red Cross), Tom Mix (silent film cowboy), Gen. Robert E. Lee's nephew Fitzhugh Lee, Theodore Roosevelt, Stephen Crane (author of "The Red Badge of Courage"), Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, Gen. Wesley Merrit, Confederate Gen. "Fightin' " Joe Wheeler, Gen. "Pecos Bill" Shafter, Gen. Nelson Miles, Adm. George Dewey, William Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, Frederick Remington, Edgar Rice Burroughs (wrote "Tarzan of the Apes")
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- When the Orioles made the unprecedented move to play the Cuban national team in Havana on March 28, 1999, the stated purpose was to improve relations between the countries through a sporting exhibition. There was no way of knowing that 14 years later a young Cuban fan in the stands that afternoon would be wearing an Orioles uniform and preparing to play at their spring training complex. Wednesday, 26-year-old outfielder and Cuban defector Henry Urrutia made his first public statements about receiving his work visa - after spending a total of 18 months in the Dominican Republic and Haiti - and finally joining the organization that gave him a $778,500 signing bonus last July.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 31, 1999
The sight of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro sitting between Orioles owner Peter Angelos and baseball commissioner Bud Selig was chilling.The 50,000 tickets that went to the Friends of Fidel and not the true baseball fans of Cuba, disheartening.The discomfort experienced by Orioles minor-leaguer Julio Vinas, the son of Cuban refugees, unsettling.The Cuba trip wasn't perfect. It was never going to be perfect. But whatever the motives on both sides, it still must be considered a success.A people-to-people exchange, that's what Angelos wanted.
NEWS
October 11, 1995
SO FIDEL CASTRO wants to come back. Now aged 69, an anachronism who drives many Americans to anachronistic fits of militant anti-communism, the Cuban dictator is due for his third appearance at the United Nations -- provided he gets a visa. The first time, in 1960, was an occasion for fiery Cold War oratory. The revolutionary, then aged 34 and in full flush from his triumphant New Year's Day march into Havana, still thought he was the future and he thought it worked.The world now knows political oppression and a command economy do not work.
NEWS
May 30, 1995
U.S. embargo hurts Cubans without causeIt is a great puzzle to me why the United States of America, a great country and supposedly world leader, chooses to persecute the peoples of Cuba.A tight trade embargo in addition to business and travel restrictions impose severe hardships on that country in an attempt to topple its government and depose Fidel Castro.Why all this, when the tiny country presents no possible military, economic or political threat to the U.S.? Yet our government continues to harass Cuba with a fanatic and unexplainable fervor.
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