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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 1996
WASHINGTON - In a new demonstration of political clout by Miami's anti-Castro Cuban exile community, Congress is preparing to shut down the Washington headquarters of Radio Marti and beam future U.S. government radio broadcasts to Cuba from South Florida.The move is expected to clear Congress soon in an appropriations bill or as part of a continuing resolution.Critics warn that the move would increase what they claim is the excessive influence over Radio Marti broadcasts wielded by Jorge Mas Canosa, the fierce opponent of President Fidel Castro who heads the Miami-based Cuban-American National Foundation, a lobbying group.
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NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | August 20, 2006
For some of us, Dec. 26 was the emptiest day of the year. After weeks of anticipation, Christmas had finally arrived in a blaze of tinsel and plastic and wrapping paper. It was, for a child, the closest thing to paradise. The day after dawned like an afterthought. Dec. 26 always felt like the fairground after the fair, the ballroom after the ball. Reality had reasserted itself. You awoke from your happy daze to an insistent question: Now what? Something very similar will probably happen soon to the Cuban exile community.
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | September 16, 1992
INDICATIONS have been coming out of Cuba that the failin Castro regime is now willing to consider what has long been the single most "impossible" act in its 33 years of revolutionary history: allowing Cuban exiles to invest in Cuba.The more cynical analysts about Cuba (of which I am usually one) are quick to pooh-pooh the indicators, because Cuban President Fidel Castro is every "comrade's" past master in matters of deceit. But this time, the situation in Cuba grows every day so much more desperate that the investment olive branch might not have the usual worms in it.This most recent gesture from Havana came late in August, when Ricardo Alarcon, the Cuban foreign minister, not only gave rare interview to Miami's Cuban-American Radio Progreso, but also said that everyone on both sides should work to "normalize ties" between Cubans and Cuban-Americans.
NEWS
By MAYA BELL and MAYA BELL,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 2, 2006
MIAMI -- After 47 years, Miami still waits. The horn-honking, flag-waving and impromptu street parties that erupted shortly after Fidel Castro temporarily ceded power to his brother late Monday continued in pockets across Miami-Dade County yesterday, but the jubilation was tempered by uncertainty. "It is a steppingstone, but the question is to what," said Leonardo Valma, 42, a history teacher who fled Cuba when he was a boy. "We all have our theories and speculations, but from the layman on the street to George Bush in the White House, that's all they are, theories and speculation."
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1999
Tightening the already restrictive security for Monday's Orioles-Cuba game at Camden Yards, the Federal Aviation Administration imposed special restrictions on the airspace around the stadium.Between 1 p.m. and midnight Monday, air traffic within three nautical miles of the stadium will have to stay above 1,500 feet, said FAA spokesman William Shumann.The normal restriction in that area -- which is handled by air traffic controllers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport -- is 1,000 feet.
NEWS
March 19, 1996
Keep our schools open on election daysAnother election day with schools closed; administrators, faculty, students vacationing, while a dismal 25 percent of the registered voters voted. Why? Who can answer the question?It is my opinion that election day would offer a wonderful opportunity for our community to observe education in progress. Let the voters walk through our schools, observe our children learning, teachers teaching. It can only serve to benefit all concerned.Our children miss too many days of school.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The collapse this month of efforts backed by the United States to topple Saddam Hussein marks the break-up of a marriage of convenience.The partners were the Central Intelligence Agency and Iraqi opponents of Hussein's regime, including the Kurds. But this was neither the first marriage nor the first break-up of its kind.Indeed, the list of partners around the world who have been helped, trained and financed by American intelligence agencies only to be abandoned later is long enough to make any foreign rebel or coup plotter wary about the United States as a secret sponsor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 26, 1996
MIAMI -- Before an air mission over Havana last summer, Billy Schuss, a pilot and co-founder of Brothers to the Rescue, sat down with Mario de la Pena to make sure some things were clear. They would not land if the Cubans tried to force their plane down, he told Mr. de la Pena, 24, who was about to make his first flight in Cuban airspace. If they died, he said, that was their choice."I wanted to know his feelings," Mr. Schuss said. "He said, 'I'll take my chances.' "On Saturday, Mr. de la Pena was one of four Brothers to the Rescue members killed when Cuban MiG jet fighters shot down their two Cessna planes over the Straits of Florida.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - It is the arrogance that most offends. Yes, the wrongheadedness is troubling, the ignorance irritating. But that damn-you arrogance is what makes you need to count to 10. I refer to the latest insult to free speech in Miami, about which, more in a moment. But first, a little background for those who came in late. Four years ago, the Cuban band Los Van Van played the Miami Arena while hundreds of Cuban exiles protested outside. They had been incited by local officials who had tried for days to block the performance of a group they regard as closely aligned with Fidel Castro's communist regime.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
They were lost in the Florida Straits, drifting atop rope-lashed planks of wood and sagging rubber dinghies. But as they pitched across the shark-infested waters, the 139 Cuban teen-agers who had abandoned family and country kept their hopes alive with visions of life in the United States.There would be Reeboks and blue jeans, they told one another, and cities where the food would never run out. There would be sports cars to drive, grand houses to furnish and places where people could speak without fear.
NEWS
By Gary Marx and Andrew Zajac and Gary Marx and Andrew Zajac,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 18, 2005
MIAMI -- With international pressure mounting and hours after a huge protest in Cuba, U.S. authorities seized yesterday a militant Cuban exile wanted in connection with the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that killed 73 people. U.S. authorities took Luis Posada Carriles into custody in Miami, where he had been hiding while awaiting a review of his request for political asylum. The detention occurred early yesterday afternoon after Posada met with reporters and as he reportedly was preparing to leave the country for Central America.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - It is the arrogance that most offends. Yes, the wrongheadedness is troubling, the ignorance irritating. But that damn-you arrogance is what makes you need to count to 10. I refer to the latest insult to free speech in Miami, about which, more in a moment. But first, a little background for those who came in late. Four years ago, the Cuban band Los Van Van played the Miami Arena while hundreds of Cuban exiles protested outside. They had been incited by local officials who had tried for days to block the performance of a group they regard as closely aligned with Fidel Castro's communist regime.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1999
Tightening the already restrictive security for Monday's Orioles-Cuba game at Camden Yards, the Federal Aviation Administration imposed special restrictions on the airspace around the stadium.Between 1 p.m. and midnight Monday, air traffic within three nautical miles of the stadium will have to stay above 1,500 feet, said FAA spokesman William Shumann.The normal restriction in that area -- which is handled by air traffic controllers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport -- is 1,000 feet.
NEWS
November 25, 1997
FIDEL CASTRO has outlived his two bitterest enemies. One was John F. Kennedy, who ordered his assassination only to be assassinated himself in 1963. The other was Jorge Mas Canosa, who fled Cuba penniless in 1960 and rose to become a Florida tycoon, act like Cuba's president-in-exile and control U.S. policy on his homeland.Mr. Mas Canosa died Sunday at home near Miami of lung cancer and other complications at 58. Mr. Castro, after 38 years in despotic power, is going strong at 71.Through the 1970s, anti-Castro Cubans in Florida engaged in quixotic conspiracies.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The collapse this month of efforts backed by the United States to topple Saddam Hussein marks the break-up of a marriage of convenience.The partners were the Central Intelligence Agency and Iraqi opponents of Hussein's regime, including the Kurds. But this was neither the first marriage nor the first break-up of its kind.Indeed, the list of partners around the world who have been helped, trained and financed by American intelligence agencies only to be abandoned later is long enough to make any foreign rebel or coup plotter wary about the United States as a secret sponsor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
They were lost in the Florida Straits, drifting atop rope-lashed planks of wood and sagging rubber dinghies. But as they pitched across the shark-infested waters, the 139 Cuban teen-agers who had abandoned family and country kept their hopes alive with visions of life in the United States.There would be Reeboks and blue jeans, they told one another, and cities where the food would never run out. There would be sports cars to drive, grand houses to furnish and places where people could speak without fear.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | August 31, 1994
CLERMONT, Fla. -- For 33 years, Jose Miro Torra has been haunted by the unfinished battle.The retired, 66-year-old Cuban exile stormed the beaches of his homeland on April 17, 1961, as part of the aborted Bay of Pigs invasion. He spent 22 months in a Cuban prison, a memory he sums up with one sentence: "Do you like macaroni?"After 29 years as an insurance salesman and lawyer in Puerto Rico, Mr. Torra returned to Florida in January with a goal: to organize another invasion.Yesterday, the newly elected president of the 1,098-member 2506 Brigade Bay of Pigs Veterans Association spoke from a small upstairs office in a sign shop in the foothills of Lake County, where he came to recruit a new, younger soldier.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | June 23, 1991
LOS GUSANOS.John Sayles. HarperCollins.473 pages. $22.95. The third novel by independent filmmaker and writer John Sayles is a fragmented thriller, long on incident and short on plot, about a community of Cuban exiles living in Miami and those who come into contact with them. In scattered vignettes, Mr. Sayles presents a huge cast of characters who are motivated by intrigue, nostalgia, cruelty, romanticism and revenge.The novel revolves around an attack on Cuba being plotted by a woman named Marta de la Pena in 1981 for the 20th anniversary of the Bay of Pigs, in order to avenge her brother Ambrosio's death in that failed invasion.
NEWS
March 19, 1996
Keep our schools open on election daysAnother election day with schools closed; administrators, faculty, students vacationing, while a dismal 25 percent of the registered voters voted. Why? Who can answer the question?It is my opinion that election day would offer a wonderful opportunity for our community to observe education in progress. Let the voters walk through our schools, observe our children learning, teachers teaching. It can only serve to benefit all concerned.Our children miss too many days of school.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 1996
WASHINGTON - Nearing the end of a lengthy inquiry into Radio Marti, the U.S.-financed radio station that broadcasts to Cuba, government investigators have documented a pattern of reprisals against employees who resisted the influence of Cuban exile leader Jorge Mas Canosa, according to agency documents and officials familiar with the inquiry.Political pressures at the station led to unbalanced news broadcasts and improper promotions and demotions, according to the officials and documents.
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