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Eileen Ambrose | November 4, 2011
If you have the hankering for a good cigar, you will be able to jump on a charter flight from BWI to Cuba beginning in March and buy a box there. Island Travel & Tours Ltd.  will be operating the weekly service that departs mid-afternoons starting March 21. William Hauf, president of Island Travel, said in a statement:  “These flights will greatly expand opportunities for increased engagement between the two countries and facilitate legal travel to Cuba for business leaders, government officials, diplomats, academics, cultural groups, agricultural interests, performing arts groups, and Cuban-Americans wishing to reconnect with their families and their country.” Baltimore is entering an elite travel niche.
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NEWS
November 8, 2011
I was elated to read your article about the new charter flights to Cuba ("BWI flights to Cuba to start in March," Nov. 5). I left Cuba in 1997 which I was 9, which officially makes me a "Castro's daughter" - the term Cuban-Americans use to describe those who left long after the revolution. That being said, I don't share the views of those who lament any thawing of relations between the United States and Cuba. For me, the Cold War is over, the Eastern bloc and the Soviets are gone, and now it's time to focus on our little island and its wonderful people who have been isolated much too long.
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NEWS
November 8, 2011
I was elated to read your article about the new charter flights to Cuba ("BWI flights to Cuba to start in March," Nov. 5). I left Cuba in 1997 which I was 9, which officially makes me a "Castro's daughter" - the term Cuban-Americans use to describe those who left long after the revolution. That being said, I don't share the views of those who lament any thawing of relations between the United States and Cuba. For me, the Cold War is over, the Eastern bloc and the Soviets are gone, and now it's time to focus on our little island and its wonderful people who have been isolated much too long.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
A Tampa-based company plans to begin offering flights next spring from BWI-Marshall Airport to Cuba, where travel has been restricted since 1961, shortly after Fidel Castro took power and nationalized U.S.-owned businesses. But visitors shouldn't count on buying tickets solely to explore the island's beaches. "You cannot go to Cuba for what they call tourism," said William Hauf, president of Island Travel & Tours Ltd., which announced plans for the flights Friday. The Island Travel trips are considered charters, though they will operate at fixed times on Wednesdays much like scheduled airline flights.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | April 30, 2000
AWEEK AGO, federal agents swooped into that bastion of anti-communist fanaticism -- better known as the home of Lazaro Gonzalez -- rescued Elian Gonzalez and reunited him with his father. That is as it should be. Now, federal officials can do something else: Get the boy and his father out of here. Immediately. Today. Yesterday couldn't have been quick enough. It's time Americans weary of the Elian Gonzalez saga spoke up. Had saner heads prevailed, the boy would have been returned to his father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, within days of his rescue from an inner tube off the Florida shore.
NEWS
By Anna M. Virtue and Anna M. Virtue,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2003
MIAMI - Mourners danced and music filled the air as about 100,000 fans waited hours in the hot South Florida sunshine yesterday to pay homage to salsa legend Celia Cruz. "She was Cuba's gift to the world," said Blanca Casa, who left the island in 1970. "She is the Cuban symbol, like the flag. I'm so proud of her." Cruz, the "queen of salsa" who recorded more than 70 albums, died Wednesday at 77 of a brain tumor. A line three deep in some spots extended a half-dozen blocks for much of the day outside the viewing at Miami's Freedom Tower, once the processing center for hundreds of thousands of Cuban exiles.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
A Tampa-based company plans to begin offering flights next spring from BWI-Marshall Airport to Cuba, where travel has been restricted since 1961, shortly after Fidel Castro took power and nationalized U.S.-owned businesses. But visitors shouldn't count on buying tickets solely to explore the island's beaches. "You cannot go to Cuba for what they call tourism," said William Hauf, president of Island Travel & Tours Ltd., which announced plans for the flights Friday. The Island Travel trips are considered charters, though they will operate at fixed times on Wednesdays much like scheduled airline flights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1998
MIAMI -- A Cuban exile who has waged a campaign of bombings and assassination attempts aimed at toppling Fidel Castro says that his efforts were supported financially for more than a decade by the Cuban-American leaders of one of America's most influential lobbying groups.Luis Posada Carriles said he organized a wave of bombings in Cuba last year at hotels, restaurants and discotheques that killed an Italian tourist and alarmed the Cuban government. Posada said he was schooled in demolition and guerrilla warfare by the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1960s.
NEWS
March 23, 1996
THIS IS NO TIME to put more control of U.S. policy toward Fidel Castro's Cuba in the hands of one faction of wealthy Cuban-Floridians. That is what Congress is about to do, by moving Radio Marti from Washington to Florida as a rider to a bill that President Clinton would sign.Radio Marti was created in 1983 to give Cubans an alternative to the Communist state media other than the official Voice of America something more Cuban, more about their lives. It was controversial but it does a job and has listeners.
NEWS
By Rafael Lorente and Rafael Lorente,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | March 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Six in 10 Cuban-American voters say they likely will cast ballots for President Bush in November, a substantial drop from the support he received in 2000, possibly reflecting tensions between exiles and a White House that some in the community feel has fallen short of its tough anti-Fidel Castro rhetoric. Bush is estimated to have garnered about 80 percent of the Cuban-American vote in the 2000 election, thanks in large part to anger over the Clinton administration's return of Elian Gonzalez to Cuba.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 4, 2011
If you have the hankering for a good cigar, you will be able to jump on a charter flight from BWI to Cuba beginning in March and buy a box there. Island Travel & Tours Ltd.  will be operating the weekly service that departs mid-afternoons starting March 21. William Hauf, president of Island Travel, said in a statement:  “These flights will greatly expand opportunities for increased engagement between the two countries and facilitate legal travel to Cuba for business leaders, government officials, diplomats, academics, cultural groups, agricultural interests, performing arts groups, and Cuban-Americans wishing to reconnect with their families and their country.” Baltimore is entering an elite travel niche.
NEWS
By Rafael Lorente and Rafael Lorente,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | March 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Six in 10 Cuban-American voters say they likely will cast ballots for President Bush in November, a substantial drop from the support he received in 2000, possibly reflecting tensions between exiles and a White House that some in the community feel has fallen short of its tough anti-Fidel Castro rhetoric. Bush is estimated to have garnered about 80 percent of the Cuban-American vote in the 2000 election, thanks in large part to anger over the Clinton administration's return of Elian Gonzalez to Cuba.
NEWS
By Anna M. Virtue and Anna M. Virtue,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2003
MIAMI - Mourners danced and music filled the air as about 100,000 fans waited hours in the hot South Florida sunshine yesterday to pay homage to salsa legend Celia Cruz. "She was Cuba's gift to the world," said Blanca Casa, who left the island in 1970. "She is the Cuban symbol, like the flag. I'm so proud of her." Cruz, the "queen of salsa" who recorded more than 70 albums, died Wednesday at 77 of a brain tumor. A line three deep in some spots extended a half-dozen blocks for much of the day outside the viewing at Miami's Freedom Tower, once the processing center for hundreds of thousands of Cuban exiles.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Llorente and Elizabeth Llorente,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 22, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - The framed artwork has come down, the posters are rolled up. The Cuban flag that sat on the mantel is stored away. Rolando Brito is leaving New Jersey for a warmer climate, extended family, and job opportunities in South Florida. When he drives down I-95 in his new black Nissan Altima, Brito will become another of the thousands of Cuban-Americans who have left New Jersey in the last decade. The reasons for the exodus range from relatives and job opportunities in other states to retirement in Florida - the closest that graying Cubans believe they'll ever come to their native island.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and By Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2001
Alfonso Fanjul Jr. was barely out of college in the fall of 1959 when he and several attorneys sat nervously at a conference table in his company's headquarters waiting for Fidel Castro's men to arrive. The soldiers, who had overthrown dictator Fulgencio Batista, were coming to announce the fate of the sugar business that Fanjul's great-grandfather had started in Cuba more than a century earlier. Even though private property was being confiscated all around him and his family had fled the country, Fanjul believed he could save the business.
NEWS
By John Thor-Dahlburg and John Thor-Dahlburg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2001
MIAMI - When the 8-year-old son of Jorge Mas Santos heard his father described in a recent radio broadcast, there was one term he didn't understand. So he asked his father. "The word," recalls Mas Santos with a thin smile, "was dictator." With Mas Santos at its eye, a hurricane is raging in Miami's Cuban-American community over the correct strategy and tactics for opposing Cuban strongman Fidel Castro and returning democracy to the island. In the last year, Mas Santos, 38, a Miami Beach-born businessman who chairs the powerful Cuban American National Foundation, has quietly steered the influential political lobbying group on a new, more pragmatic tack and away from the virulent right-wing policies that had become synonymous with Cuban-American politics.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Llorente and Elizabeth Llorente,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 22, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - The framed artwork has come down, the posters are rolled up. The Cuban flag that sat on the mantel is stored away. Rolando Brito is leaving New Jersey for a warmer climate, extended family, and job opportunities in South Florida. When he drives down I-95 in his new black Nissan Altima, Brito will become another of the thousands of Cuban-Americans who have left New Jersey in the last decade. The reasons for the exodus range from relatives and job opportunities in other states to retirement in Florida - the closest that graying Cubans believe they'll ever come to their native island.
NEWS
April 15, 2000
THE EXTENDED Gonzalez family of Miami is entitled to pursue every legal avenue in seeking custody of Elian Gonzalez. But that family, the Cuban American National Foundation and its supporters have no right to defy the law or to try to intimidate the federal government from its enforcement. This small, possibly unrepresentative group, is causing Americans elsewhere to question the welcome and favoritism extended to Cuban refugees for decades. Family values and state laws award custody of a little boy in Elian Gonzalez' position to the surviving parent, especially where there is a record of caring involvement.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | February 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - Launching a new offensive on the Capitol, Cuban American National Foundation Chairman Jorge Mas Santos is urging a technological and financial invasion of Cuba, funded by U.S. aid, to topple Fidel Castro's regime. The United States should arm anti-Castro Cubans with cell phones and computer printers, fax machines and Internet access through special federal funding to private organizations and individuals, Mas said this week, in his first major address since taking over the influential lobby.
TOPIC
By Peter Kornbluh | April 30, 2000
THE APRIL 22 Immigration and Naturalization Service raid in Little Havana not only resulted in the long overdue return of Elian Gonzalez to his father -- it also created an opening for a reconsideration of U.S. policy toward Cuba. Behind the acrimonious human drama surrounding this 6-year-old has always been the larger, but equally polarized issue of U.S.-Cuban relations. Like Elian himself, these relations have been held hostage to the dictates of a politically powerful, albeit small, right-wing coalition centered in Dade County, Florida.
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