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NEWS
June 18, 2008
On June 13, 2008, MILDRED ELIZABETH. Friends may call at THE CHATMAN- HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Wednesday, 1-8 p.m., where the family will be present from 6-7 p.m. The family will receive friends, Thursday 11:30 a.m. at the Gough U.M. Church, 14200 Cuba Road, Cockeysville, MD. Funeral services will begin at 12 p.m. Interment Gough U.M. Church Cemetery
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NEWS
June 5, 2008
Margo Miley Memorial contributions can be made to the Alzheimer's Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, MD. 21093. A Memorial Service will be held at the Catholic Community of St. Francis Xavier, 13717 Cuba Road in Hunt Valley, Maryland 21030 on Friday June 6th. at 10:00 A.M.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 2, 2008
Dr. Maria G. Secada, a retired physician who practiced in 1940s Cuba, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center in Catonsville. The Timonium resident was 92. Born Maria Lovio in the province of Matanzas, Cuba, she was a graduate of the University of Havana School of Medicine. She worked in Cuba's heath department and was a pioneer in establishing a hot-lunch program for students in the 1950s, family members said. She left Cuba in 1963 aboard a ferry that was involved in an exchange of food and medicine.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 4, 2008
At some point in this presidential campaign, we may have a real debate on foreign policy differences between the parties. That hasn't yet happened. The candidates have sparred about experience. They have clashed on Iraq. But they're still dancing around the most central question: How do you balance force and diplomacy when trying to keep America safe? Nothing illustrates the need for clarity more than the jousting over whether America should talk directly to the likes of Ra?l Castro or Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 26, 2008
Fidel Castro is stepping down? As Dorothy Parker said upon hearing of the death of President Calvin Coolidge, how can you tell? The bearded one lost most of his relevancy for us "yanquis" long ago. He once loomed large in the lives of baby boomers as we crouched under our desks in "duck-and-cover" drills, terrified of his nuclear-tipped Russian missiles. To today's youths, Mr. Castro is so last century. Even in Miami and Havana, the response to Mr. Castro's retirement is reported to be remarkably ho-hum.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | February 25, 2008
ATLANTA -- Fidel Castro has had a powerful ally in his half-century of brutal rule: the U.S. government. The antiquated U.S. policy of complete isolation has done more to help Mr. Castro maintain his ruthless tyranny than any of his police-state tactics - brutally quashing dissent, ruining (or murdering) potential rivals, and occasionally allowing criminals and troublemakers to flee. Mr. Castro blamed the U.S. embargo for every misery visited upon Cuban citizens, from fuel shortages to food rationing to dwindling medical supplies.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Carol J. Williams and Miguel Bustillo and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2008
MIAMI -- Cuba's parliament signaled yesterday that the status quo of a stunted state-run economy and strained relations with the United States will persist for now as it named Raul Castro to replace his ailing brother Fidel as president and chose another aging revolutionary as the nation's No. 2 leader. The selection of Raul Castro, 76, to head the Council of State had been widely predicted, as he stood loyally by his brother's side throughout a 49-year rule. But the appointment of Jose Ramon Machado, 77, as first vice president surprised Cuba analysts who had expected that a younger candidate would be named to bring change to the country's ossified power structure.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | February 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- What the CIA couldn't do with exploding seashells, poison cigars and chemicals to make his beard fall off, Fidel Castro has done alone. He removed himself from a world stage that he seemed to dominate for nearly 50 years. So compelling was this 6-foot-3-inch, Jesuit-trained former lawyer that he inspired and drove revolutionary movements across Central America and Africa. He twisted American policymakers into such awkward knots that the United States has maintained severe economic sanctions against Cuba, and at the same time a naval station on the island's southeastern tip, housing the most notorious alleged terrorists in captivity at Guantanamo Bay. "He survived paramilitary invasions, assassination attempts, trade embargoes, travel bans, diplomatic isolation.
NEWS
February 20, 2008
Fidel Castro has made official what seemed inevitable since he disappeared from the spotlight 18 months ago following surgery. His resignation as president of Cuba is the end of an era, but it should also mark the beginning of a new relationship between Cuba and the U.S. This transition of power in Cuba comes with more of a whimper and not the bang with which Mr. Castro led the revolution nearly half a century ago that transformed his country from an...
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