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By Cox News Service | June 10, 2007
HAVANA, Cuba -- The economics minister uses phrases like "developing our human capital" while citing ways that the government is battling to improve daily life for its people. Meanwhile, a key student leader worries that Cuba's youth might be lost to the lures of the flashy consumerism thriving in much of the rest of the world. These are interesting days in communist Cuba. While top leaders remain committed to socialism, there seems to be something of a debate going on in Cuba about the island's future.
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NEWS
By Nanine Hartzenbusch and Nanine Hartzenbusch,Sun Staff | April 18, 1999
Little feet patter on a wood floor to the rhythm of a slightly out-of-tune piano. A teacher barks out a tempo and taps her foot as the pupils repeat a dance move over and over until perfection is achieved.Hard work, practice, dreams and disappointment -- it could be a ballet school anywhere in the world. But these pupils study at the Escuela Elemental de Ballet Alejo Carpentier in Havana, Cuba. Founded in 1961, it is the feeder school for the National Ballet of Cuba, 90 percent of whose dancers started at Alejo Carpentier.
NEWS
By DeWayne Wickham | March 26, 1999
HAVANA -- Up close, the face of Cuba looks a lot more like Baltimore than south Florida.From the narrow streets of Old Havana to the fashionable Miramar district of the Cuban capital and the distant city of Santiago de Cuba, this island's residents bear a striking resemblance to the citizens of Baltimore.The people of African descent here range in color from ebony to cafe au lait -- a far different racial makeup than the Cuban expatriates massed in south Florida.In Cuba, whites are clearly a minority.
NEWS
By Carlos Rafael Rodriguez | December 6, 1990
HavanaTHE WORD to define Cuba's relationship with the Soviet Union is uncertainty. We don't know what will happen in the long run. The only certainty is that, in the immediate future, the situation will worsen.As a result of the U.S. trade embargo, Cuba conducts 70 percent of its total trade with the U.S.S.R. and gets 90 percent of its oil from the Soviets. So we are prepared for the worst, for what I estimate will be five to six very difficult years ahead.We must adjust to the changes in the world, hoping that the Soviet Union can sustain and reconsolidate itself while we put in place our own alternatives.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | April 18, 2009
Progress toward a thaw in U.S.-Cuban relations gained unexpected momentum Friday as leaders of the two countries signaled a willingness to open potentially historic talks on issues that have bitterly divided them since the days of the Cold War. President Barack Obama called for a "new beginning" with the island nation, capping a surge of gestures fed by Cuban President Raul Castro's declaration Thursday that his country "could be wrong" about its approach...
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | August 5, 1991
HAVANA -- The Cubans are trying very hard to put their best foot forward during the Pan American Games. They are well aware that with hundreds of foreign journalists in town, any miscues will become instant news.Police presence in areas tourists frequent and around games sites is heavy, and crowd control is carefully orchestrated.There is no admission charge for Cubans who want to attend the competitions, and popular events like Saturday's U.S.-Cuba basketball game are drawing overflow crowds.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | March 24, 1994
Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services and the Catholic Medical Mission Board in New York announced in Baltimore yesterday a shipment of $2.5 million worth of medical supplies to Cuba.The insulin, antibiotics, surgical supplies and drugs for the treatment of heart disease flown to Havana Tuesday on a chartered plane from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., represents "a significant expansion of our Cuban aid effort," a Catholic Relief Services spokesman said.The shipment is the second involvement this month by Maryland's religious community in aid to Cuba.
NEWS
January 12, 2000
LATELY, IT SEEMS that all of Miami and all of Havana are making claims that politics did not interfere with the case of Elian Gonzalez, the 6-year-old Cuban boy at the center of an international custody battle. Unfortunately, all the discussion around Elian has focused on the politics of emotions by trying to get people to sympathize with one ideology or another through the plight of this boy, not on the politics that created the situation he finds himself in. If we are to learn anything from this ordeal, the debate would be best served if we began to look at the larger context.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1992
MEXICO CITY -- Moscow's top Latin American diplomat said Cuba "should send signals" to the United States that it is willing to "bend over backward" to negotiate an end to their 33-year-old feud.Valeri Nickolaenko, head of the Russian Foreign Ministry's Latin America department, declared that Moscow, having helped the United States resolve the Salvadoran and Nicaraguan civil wars, would now give top priority to lifting the U.S. blockade against Cuba and re-establishing normal ties between the two countries.
NEWS
By Stephen Johnson | July 7, 2004
WASHINGTON -- While immigration reform is the acknowledged "third rail" of American politics -- touch it and you immediately anger some constituency -- U.S. policy toward Cuba comes a close second. There are two distinct arguments on how to treat this pesky dictatorship 90 miles from our coast, and proponents of either position pillory anyone who deviates. Hence the Bush administration has gotten a drubbing from traditional supporters in the Cuban-American community and from anti-embargo advocates for suggesting more nuanced, targeted sanctions.
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