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By GARY MARX and GARY MARX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 31, 2005
HAVANA -- Bolivia's President-elect Evo Morales arrived in Cuba yesterday on his first overseas trip since winning a landslide victory that shifts the political tide in Latin America further leftward. Greeted at the airport in Havana by Cuban President Fidel Castro, Morales expressed joy at being in Cuba and described his two-day visit here as a show of "friendship for the Cuban people." Castro called the Dec. 18 victory by Morales, a stanch U.S. opponent and Bolivia's first indigenous president, "something extraordinary, something historic."
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 10, 1995
Washington -- WE ARE NOT going to lift the embargo." Morton Halperin, the senior White House national security aide who was one of the authors of the administration's new Cuban immigration policy, told me again, "We are not going to lift the embargo."
NEWS
By WAYNE S. SMITH | December 27, 2005
The Treasury Department's recent announcement that it would not grant a license for a Cuban baseball team to participate in the World Baseball Classic planned for March was deeply disappointing but hardly a surprise. On the contrary, it was in keeping with the Bush administration's policy of trying to seal off all contact with the Caribbean island. Cuban academics are no longer given visas to come to the United States for conferences. American scholars find it increasingly difficult to carry out programs in Cuba because of tightening U.S. restrictions.
NEWS
By REED JOHNSON and REED JOHNSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
HAVANA -- In the once-crumbling Plaza Vieja in Old Havana, a European men's clothing store has opened its expensively refurbished doors a few yards from a fancy new Austrian microbrewery. The clothing store's plush, wood-lined interior is stocked with upscale sporting and casual wear reminiscent of Brooks Brothers or L.L. Bean, while the microbrewery's sparkling counters, mood lighting, and clientele of tourists and laid-back residents seem more Caribbean party hot spot than one-party socialist state.
NEWS
By LILLIAN GUERRA and LILLIAN GUERRA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 30, 2006
Interpreting Cuba's reality through the everyday experiences of islanders and assessing its current and future prospects have become increasing concerns of U.S. writers in recent years. While the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s brought little change in U.S. policy toward Cuba, the same process resulted in radical shifts in the Cuban economy as Fidel Castro's government weathered a massive humanitarian crisis and adopted state capitalism in order to survive. Today, after nearly 16 years of developing foreign investment and international tourism, the Cuban state has seemingly left the nationalist refrain of "Cuba for the Cubans" behind.
NEWS
By SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - A bipartisan group of U.S. senators wants to keep the Bush administration from making sales of food to Cuba more difficult. Democratic Sen. Max Baucus of Montana and Republican Sens. Larry E. Craig of Idaho, Pat Roberts of Kansas and Richard G. Lugar of Indiana are to introduce legislation today that would ease restrictions on doing business with Cuba. In part, the legislation is a response to efforts by the Bush administration to change the way Cuba pays American farmers for food.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 26, 1993
HAVANA -- A half-dozen boats from Key West, Fla., weathered high seas to arrive at Marina Hemingway yesterday, carrying much-needed medical supplies for the Cuban people.The flotilla of private craft was smaller than expected. Some would-be participants backed out Saturday from the 90-mile journey because of conditions in the Florida Straits -- 40-mph winds and 20-foot swells.Although the United States has not allowed travel or trade with Cuba since Cuba's communist regime came to power more than 30 years ago, the flotilla was licensed for humanitarian reasons.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Since arriving in 1981, Georgetown University graduate student Erich De La Fuente has talked to his relatives in Cuba just once.That was last Christmas, when he and his mother used an expensive -- and, in the U.S. government's view, illegal -- Canadian phone connection for 15 minutes.A 1992 U.S. law was supposed to change that, allowing U.S. phone companies to provide regular, low-cost service between the United States and Cuba. But nearly two years later, the phone link is still dead, and an atmosphere of increased tension clouds its prospects further.
NEWS
By Morris Morley and Chris McGillion | October 16, 2002
WASHINGTON -- One of the casualties of the approaching congressional elections will be any prospect that Washington's Cuba policy might be removed from its Cold War freezer and thawed to serve contemporary U.S. national interests. The explanation is the electoral clout of a narrow, if declining, majority of Florida's Cuban-Americans and their insistence that political candidates accept their hard line regarding Havana. Tied to this is the perceived political dependence of both President Bush and his brother, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, on Miami.
NEWS
By PETER KORNBLUH and JAMES G. BLIGHT | November 6, 1994
U.S. officials recently concluded another round of talks on immigration with Cuba but once again rejected the possibility of a broader diplomatic dialogue to improve overall bilateral relations.When Joseph Sullivan, the head of the U.S. interests section in Havana, expressed hope for return to the "very close and very friendly relationship" that once existed between Cuba and the United States, Clinton administration officials sharply rebuked him and reiterated their policy of isolating Cuba politically and economically.
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