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NEWS
August 24, 1994
Want to know the cruelest action the United States could take against the Cuban rafters? Withdraw the two-dozen Navy and Coast Guard ships on patrol in the Florida Straits and let the sharks have at them! That would slow the exodus, and quick. According to some reports, such an approach actually was broached at the White House last week before President Clinton decided on the far more humane course of taking thousands of asylum-seekers to Guantanamo for safe-keeping as the Cuban crisis moves in unpredictable ways.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 12, 1992
Three new or refurbished tourist hotels -- including only the second five-star hotel built in Cuba since the revolution -- have just opened their doors to an international clientele.It's part of Cuba's drive to create more than 30,000 hotel rooms for the international market by 1995, and to breathe new life into its staggering economy.Though President Fidel Castro insists that Cuba won't abandon socialism for capitalism, Cuba's ambitious plans count heavily on foreign capital and joint ventures with international investors.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | October 28, 1991
At a time when Cuba's 11 million people are having to scrape and scramble for the most basic of necessities, their fearless leader, Fidel Castro, with his cry of "Socialism or Death," has delivered on his promise. No doubt death is on the way.Death for communism, that is.If what I say sounds like an optimistic exaggeration, consider what happened when Cuba's Communist Party Congress met last week to decide where to lead the nation now that it has lost its old benefactor, the Soviet Union.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Mr. O'Mara is Foreign Editor of The Sun | December 9, 1990
Cuba: a Journey.Jacobo Timerman.Knopf.125 pages. $18.95.For many Americans, dosed for decades unrelentingly with anti-Castro propaganda, Cuba is a country competing with Albania and China to be the next communist domino to fall. For others, for whom the socialist dream goes a-glimmering, it remains a bastion of distributionist harmony.To Jacobo Timerman (despite some fairly impressive vital statistics, such barometers as infant mortality, physicians per thousand population and so on), Cuba is merely a sclerotic state, imprisoned in time and held in thrall to Fidel Castro's gargantuan if souring personality.
NEWS
October 14, 2011
Please pass on to letter writer Umar Farooq ("Occupy Baltimore: There's a reason The Sun can't grasp what our movement is about," Oct. 8) that most of us prefer the optimism and opportunity of capitalism to the pessimism and depression of socialism. He should look at Cuba as an example of socialism - and then ask himself why the U.S. gets so many immigrants from that country, while almost no one from here wants to live there. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
NEWS
By Jerry Haar | May 29, 2002
MIAMI -- While heated debate over the morality and effectiveness of the U.S. embargo on Cuba continues, scant attention has been paid to the practical, business dimension of the issue -- namely, that even if the embargo on doing business with Cuba were lifted tomorrow, the country would remain a highly unattractive place in which to do business. Lifting restrictions would not result in Fidel Castro's swapping his copy of Karl Marx's Das Kapital for Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations, nor would it inspire brother Raul, vice president and defense minister, to seek a leave from government to spend a year as a visiting fellow at the Heritage Foundation.
NEWS
By Wayne S. Smith | April 30, 2007
The Bush administration's restrictions on academic travel to Cuba are so harsh that they have brought such travel virtually to a halt. Now, about 450 professors and academics from colleges and universities across the nation have banded together to take the federal government to court and challenge their legality. The stated purpose of these restrictions was to deny hard currency to Cuban government coffers. But visiting professors and students are not exactly known as big spenders. The pittance they might have left behind would have had little impact on a Cuban economy registering strong growth rates.
NEWS
By Hilary Cosell | April 25, 2000
I AM JUST plumb tuckered out from Cuba. Mention "Cuba" once more, let alone "Elian," and I am certain to collapse like an elderly piece of furniture unable to withstand any more weight. This "island 90 miles off the coast of Florida" (as it is always described) maneuvered its way into my consciousness when I was about 7 years old, and it has remained lodged there, jabbing at my brain, when other mightier nations, like the Soviet Union, have long departed from my thoughts. Why is this? Well, perhaps it's because Cuba's "exiles" are the Hispanic equivalent of old Brooklyn Dodger fans.
NEWS
October 24, 1990
Fidel Castro's revolution has now taken Cuba to the point where oxen are replacing tractors and bicycles rather than automobiles will soon be the chief means of transport. Ironically, it is not the United States that is threatening to bring down the Castro regime -- perhaps before the end of 1991. It is the Soviet Union.Long ago, Cuba learned to live without U.S. trade and economic aid. But can it live without the $5-billion annual subsidy from Moscow that accounts for 20 percent of its entire gross national product?
NEWS
August 27, 1991
Fidel Castro brought it off. The 11th Pan American Games in Cuba were a triumph for the home team. The country is left with new facilities for its sports program. Cuba came in first in golds for the first time, with 140 to the U.S. 130, and had a whopping 265 total medals for a small country, good for second place to the U.S., which had 352.Canada, it should be noted, came in third in total medals and gold, ahead of Brazil and Mexico. The U.S. sent second-string teams in several sports because of conflict with other events.
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