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By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 25, 1994
Paris. -- Only a truly innocent man could say, as President Bill Clinton said on Aug. 19, that all the United States wants for Cuba is that it be swept up in the hemispheric wave of ''democracy and freedom.''Mr. Clinton surely wishes Cubans well, but history contradicts him. The historical American relationship to the Cuban nation has been anything but a struggle for Cuba's liberation. The events of recent days are Cuba's revenge for that history.Fidel Castro has a victory. He has compelled Mr. Clinton to reverse an American policy that, since the Cuban Refugee Act of 1966, gave automatic U.S. entry to anyone leaving Cuba.
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NEWS
August 10, 1994
The riot against the Fidel Castro regime last Friday in Havana brought protest to a new level of openness in Communist Cuba. Cuba is unraveling. Nothing works. The economy is creaking to a halt. People are desperate. There is a question how much longer this can go on.But Mr. Castro will survive this week and next week. The orchestrated demonstration Sunday in support of his regime was more than ten times larger. Mr. Castro and the Communists he has kept in power since 1958 still monopolize power, communications and patronage in Cuban society.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 13, 1991
Washington -- OVER THE past troubled year for Cuba, whenever people have asked me what Fidel Castro will do if he finally goes down, they have been stunned by my response.Invariably, they seem to think I have gone a bit berserk when 66TC answer, "Well, he might attack Florida."Now, suddenly, the apocalyptic "solution" to Castro's woes does not seem so strange at all. In fact, I just came across an ominous congressional statement of this spring by the University of Miami professor and specialist on Cuba, Jiri Valenta, in which he goes further than I ever did.What unites all schools of thought on Cuba today, he says, is "the fear that an abrupt Soviet disengagement followed by a clear-cut revolutionary situation in Cuba might provoke some U.S. counteraction and, in turn, a Cuban attack on the Turkey Point nuclear facility in Florida."
NEWS
By Steven Miles | March 1, 1996
HAVANA -- As the United States goes through another Cuban crisis, I am in Cuba teaching geriatric medicine for the Ministry of Health and at an international medical conference with leading doctors from Europe and South America.Havana has greatly changed in the last two years. With market reforms, enterprising Cubans have opened many restaurants, coffee shops, repair shops and car dealerships. Pharmacy shelves are stocked.The endearing 1950s Chevies are still plentiful, but many newer cars, motorcycles and bicycles fight them for parking spaces.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | October 11, 1991
Miami -- YOU SCOFF at the idea that the shadowy intrigues of historic Byzantium could be brought back to life today, right off the shores of our very own sunny Florida? That today Caribbean "emperors" are manipulating not in the name of God, but of the "free market"?I suggest very strongly then that you look, this watershed second week of October, at Fidel Castro's Cuba.In Havana, GeorgieAnneGeyeras Castro faced the Fourth Communist Party Congress yesterday, he was plotting for his very life as never before in his 32 years in power.
NEWS
May 4, 1995
One of the first duties of any government is to protect its borders. As a nation needing immigrants, the United States historically had an expansive interpretation of that dictum. But in more recent times, blessed by a plentiful population, the U.S. has adopted the more universal practice of admitting only those with wanted skills or compelling social or political reasons to immigrate.Since Fidel Castro came to power, 35 years ago, Cuba has been a special case. Any of its citizens who could make it to our shores was automatically granted residence.
NEWS
June 10, 1995
Cuba's detention of accused swindler and cocaine trafficker Robert Vesco as a possible prelude to extraditing him to the United States raises intriguing questions about relations between Washington and Havana. For the Castro regime to consider such a move is an unmistakable bid for reconciliation, especially since it comes after the Clinton administration's decision to send would-be Cuban refugees back to their homeland rather than accept them as legal immigrants.If Vesco returns, he will bring with him a life story so smacking of salable fiction that he has tried to give his children legal ownership of its details.
NEWS
By Jeane Kirkpatrick | November 7, 1990
Washington. THE DEATH of Communism is less an event than a process -- a process now painfully under way in Cuba. The Marxist regime is still in power, but the world revolution from which it drew energy and sustenance has died.Fidel Castro is girding his countrymen's loins for the ''special period'' of hardship when the revolution will be tested as never before. The economic crisis of which Mr. Castro warned last January is nearly upon them. The Socialist trading system of barter and subsidies has collapsed with the transformation of Eastern Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2009
Cuba de Ayer is the wonderful creation of Jessica Rodriguez, who thought so highly of her mother-in-law's home-style Cuban cooking that she decided to open a restaurant. Her mother-in-law, Mayra Lopez, from Camaguey in Cuba, was, I assume, first flattered and later surprised when this actually happened. Cuba de Ayer graciously serves moderately priced, wholesome, and very tasty food in cheerfully attractive and well-managed surroundings. It's the kind of suburban restaurant that is packed with merry regulars on a Sunday night, the kind of place that people discover by word of mouth and stay loyal to for years.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Several lessons might be drawn from the Orioles' 11-inning victory over a Cuban all-star baseball team in Havana Sunday.One is that good pitching will stop good hitting. Another is that there are a number of Cuban ballplayers who could play in the U.S. major leagues, not just the two who starred in the past two World Series.But the real lesson is that the continued isolation of Cuba is even more ridiculous than it was a generation ago. There are too many common elements in our culture that bridge the artificial barriers of politics.
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