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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Does Cuba Gooding Jr. know how not to mug? Rat Race, Snow Dogs, Boat Trip and now The Fighting Temptations - put Gooding in a comedy, and there appears to be an ironclad guarantee that he'll mug for the camera until his face all but falls off. True, it's hard to think of a more effervescent actor - his Oscar-winning turn in Jerry Maguire was all about flamboyance made accessible - but does he always have to play everything at such a high pitch? The Fighting Temptations is a formulaic feel-gooder about a patchwork gospel choir looking to hold its own against the big boys.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
WASHINGTON - Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. and Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson are a formidable pair. One is an Academy Award winner, while the other is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. And so, it is with some trepidation that you begin an interview with them at a fancy restaurant asking if they could scooch together a little more on a couch and try to lean forward and speak directly into an old Radio Shack microcassette recorder on a table in front of them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
WASHINGTON - Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. and Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson are a formidable pair. One is an Academy Award winner, while the other is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. And so, it is with some trepidation that you begin an interview with them at a fancy restaurant asking if they could scooch together a little more on a couch and try to lean forward and speak directly into an old Radio Shack microcassette recorder on a table in front of them.
FEATURES
By Rick Bentley and Rick Bentley,McClatchy Newspapers | August 8, 2007
Eddie Murphy and Jeff Garlin must be the smartest men in the entertainment world. The actors had enough brain cells to know that their Daddy Day Care was an unexpected hit in 2003. That meant pushing the premise for a sequel made about as much sense as wearing a meat bathing suit in a pool of piranhas. Cuba Gooding Jr. and Paul Rae must be the dumbest men in entertainment. Gooding adds the Daddy Day Care sequel, Daddy Day Camp, to a resume that includes Rat Race, Boat Trip and Norbit. These awful efforts have come along since he picked up the best supporting actor Oscar for his work in the 1996 film Jerry Maguire.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 1997
"The English Patient," a passionate story of doomed love played out against the tragedy of World War II, dominated the 69th Annual Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences last night, winning nine awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.But it was shut out of the two major acting awards, when both its stars, Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas, finished out of the money.Instead, Geoffrey Rush, the Australian actor who brought dignity and pain to his portrayal of a concert pianist haunted from childhood by mental difficulties, won the Academy Award for "Shine."
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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
The door swings open. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is on the other side. The door slams shut. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is still on the other side.Laughing, he finally makes it into the room. This wasn't a lame attempt at a Hollywood style "entrance," he says. "The door closed on me," he explains reaching out a hand in greeting.Well, not too many doors are closing on this guy these days.You know Gooding. He played the swaggering, loudmouth, professional football player who shouted the now-immortal phrase "Show me the money!"
FEATURES
By Rick Bentley and Rick Bentley,McClatchy Newspapers | August 8, 2007
Eddie Murphy and Jeff Garlin must be the smartest men in the entertainment world. The actors had enough brain cells to know that their Daddy Day Care was an unexpected hit in 2003. That meant pushing the premise for a sequel made about as much sense as wearing a meat bathing suit in a pool of piranhas. Cuba Gooding Jr. and Paul Rae must be the dumbest men in entertainment. Gooding adds the Daddy Day Care sequel, Daddy Day Camp, to a resume that includes Rat Race, Boat Trip and Norbit. These awful efforts have come along since he picked up the best supporting actor Oscar for his work in the 1996 film Jerry Maguire.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE **1/2 Disney gets back to the basics with Home on the Range, where the characters are cute, the tunes are knee-slappers and the gags are almost as big as the West. With Randy Quaid as a yodeling cattle rustler and Roseanne Barr as a cow out to foil him, how could they go wrong? It's a stitch, from the cowboy chorale title tune to Roseanne Barr, voicing the milk cow Maggie, bragging about her udders. ("Yeah, they're real. Stop staring.") This is Disney with a hint of Pixar's comic edge.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
Even fans of Quentin Tarantino's gonzo gangsterism may find Shadowboxer to be a neo-noir novelty act worthy of rotten green tomatoes. Lee Daniels is a highly regarded indie producer with credits such as Monster's Ball and The Woodsman behind him. This movie about the humanity of paid assassins has enough gloss, pace and picturesque Philadelphia locations to suggest that he might have a career as a director in front of him. But he won't have much of...
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By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
Jack Warden joins John Ritter in Imagine Films-Universal's "Problem Child II," scheduled to get under way next month.Alyssa Milano of "Who's the Boss," Jonathan Silverman and George Newbern star in Creative Edge Films' collegiate comedy "Co-Ed," written and directed by Jimmy Zeilinger. The Martin Wiley-Jeffrey Neuman produced film is shooting in Los Angeles.Martin Lawrence from New Line Cinema's "House Party" and Darryl Sivad head the cast in New Line's "Talking Dirty After Dark," written and directed by Topper Carew.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
Even fans of Quentin Tarantino's gonzo gangsterism may find Shadowboxer to be a neo-noir novelty act worthy of rotten green tomatoes. Lee Daniels is a highly regarded indie producer with credits such as Monster's Ball and The Woodsman behind him. This movie about the humanity of paid assassins has enough gloss, pace and picturesque Philadelphia locations to suggest that he might have a career as a director in front of him. But he won't have much of...
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By LEWIS BEALE and LEWIS BEALE,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS | February 19, 2006
In 1997, Cuba Gooding Jr., not yet 30, had almost everything show business could offer. Critics loved him. Peers had voted him an Oscar for his performance as the flamboyant wide receiver Rod Tidwell in Jerry Maguire. And the respect that came with his earlier portrayal of the conflicted teenager Tre Styles in Boyz N the Hood had not worn thin. That Gooding's career has since become a train wreck is hardly news. Over the past decade, he has fired agents with regularity, gone without representation for nearly a year and starred in a string of dubious projects that have been trashed by reviewers.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE **1/2 Disney gets back to the basics with Home on the Range, where the characters are cute, the tunes are knee-slappers and the gags are almost as big as the West. With Randy Quaid as a yodeling cattle rustler and Roseanne Barr as a cow out to foil him, how could they go wrong? It's a stitch, from the cowboy chorale title tune to Roseanne Barr, voicing the milk cow Maggie, bragging about her udders. ("Yeah, they're real. Stop staring.") This is Disney with a hint of Pixar's comic edge.
FEATURES
By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | October 24, 2003
Earlier in the month, an Iranian human rights activist was glorified by the Nobel Peace Prize committee, while just this week Mother Teresa was beatified by the pope. Hollywood, not to be outdone, has canonized a white football coach who took it upon himself to be nice to a young black man of limited intellectual capacity. The coach's beneficence was doubly worthy of a major motion picture, we are to infer, because the events transpired in a South Carolina village at a time (early '70s)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Does Cuba Gooding Jr. know how not to mug? Rat Race, Snow Dogs, Boat Trip and now The Fighting Temptations - put Gooding in a comedy, and there appears to be an ironclad guarantee that he'll mug for the camera until his face all but falls off. True, it's hard to think of a more effervescent actor - his Oscar-winning turn in Jerry Maguire was all about flamboyance made accessible - but does he always have to play everything at such a high pitch? The Fighting Temptations is a formulaic feel-gooder about a patchwork gospel choir looking to hold its own against the big boys.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 21, 2003
Boat Trip is so relentless in its crudity, so indiscriminate in its pursuit of tasteless laughs, so pure in its determination to offend, one almost has to admire it. It's even funny. Sometimes. But more often, it's simply embarrassing, 95 minutes of gay jokes filled with the sort of mean-spirited humor that's more discomfiting than hilarious. When the laughs do land, it seems more a matter of getting lucky than anything the filmmakers actually planned. It also marks yet another sad chapter in the puzzling career decline of Cuba Gooding Jr., who since winning an Oscar for Jerry Maguire has seemed bent on appearing in as many bad comedies as he can squeeze into his schedule.
FEATURES
By Jan Stuart and Jan Stuart,NEWSDAY | October 24, 2003
Earlier in the month, an Iranian human rights activist was glorified by the Nobel Peace Prize committee, while just this week Mother Teresa was beatified by the pope. Hollywood, not to be outdone, has canonized a white football coach who took it upon himself to be nice to a young black man of limited intellectual capacity. The coach's beneficence was doubly worthy of a major motion picture, we are to infer, because the events transpired in a South Carolina village at a time (early '70s)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 21, 2003
Boat Trip is so relentless in its crudity, so indiscriminate in its pursuit of tasteless laughs, so pure in its determination to offend, one almost has to admire it. It's even funny. Sometimes. But more often, it's simply embarrassing, 95 minutes of gay jokes filled with the sort of mean-spirited humor that's more discomfiting than hilarious. When the laughs do land, it seems more a matter of getting lucky than anything the filmmakers actually planned. It also marks yet another sad chapter in the puzzling career decline of Cuba Gooding Jr., who since winning an Oscar for Jerry Maguire has seemed bent on appearing in as many bad comedies as he can squeeze into his schedule.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1999
The discerning filmgoer may have to cross a lot of personal boundaries to plop down into a seat in a theater where "Chill Factor" is playing, but the movie works harder than most to make it worth the effort.In large measure, the reason "Chill Factor" labors so valiantly is that it has so much of the baggage of familiarity to overcome."Chill Factor" is yet another movie that throws men of differing races and backgrounds -- namely Oscar-winner Cuba Gooding Jr. and Skeet Ulrich -- into a potentially cataclysmic situation and forces them to not only work together against seeming impossible odds, but actually like each other.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
The door swings open. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is on the other side. The door slams shut. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is still on the other side.Laughing, he finally makes it into the room. This wasn't a lame attempt at a Hollywood style "entrance," he says. "The door closed on me," he explains reaching out a hand in greeting.Well, not too many doors are closing on this guy these days.You know Gooding. He played the swaggering, loudmouth, professional football player who shouted the now-immortal phrase "Show me the money!"
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