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By Myriam Marquez | October 5, 1994
TWELVE-year-old Oscarito is one of about 5,000 children who ended up at the U.S. Naval Base in Guantanamo Bay during the August exodus of Cubans on rafts seeking freedom. Thirty thousand Cubans now are at Guantanamo, living in tents on part of the very island they intended to flee.Oscarito and his father, Oscar Govantes, no longer live at the base, though. They arrived in Miami last Wednesday after the child became temporarily paralyzed and was sent to Washington for treatment.The boy can walk again, and, for humanitarian reasons, the U.S. government has allowed Oscarito and his father to live with relatives in Miami.
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SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
What do you do when the small speedboat you're using to escape illegally from Cuba runs out of fuel partway through the Gulf of Mexico? The vessel rocks uncomfortably atop large waves. You haven't eaten in days. You know what could happen if you're caught. You fear the worst. "The first thought was, 'Wow, I went through so much just to die on the edge,'" Dariel Alvarez, 25, recalled recently in Spanish. "I was scared to come so far and fall short. " Two years later, the Triple-A Norfolk outfielder is one of the Orioles' rising position prospects, combining a steady glove in the outfield with an electrifying plate presence.
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NEWS
November 7, 2013
For the 22nd consecutive year, on Oct. 29, 2013, the U.S. government was again put to shame at the U.N. General Assembly where 188 countries voted to condemn the U.S. embargo of Cuba. The only two countries that supported the U.S. embargo are the U.S. and Israel - with the interesting fact that Israel has full economic and diplomatic relations with Cuba! This punitive embargo goes back to 1960, and it was put in place with the intent of making the Cuban people suffer so that they would rise up and overthrow their government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
When Emily Parker started writing columns about China and the Internet for the Wall Street Journal in 2004, she was skeptical that fledgling social media sites could make much of an impact. "I wasn't convinced that the Internet was going to be transformative," she said during a recent interview. (An edited transcript of that conversation appears below.) "I thought, 'OK, a little information will get past the censors. But, is that really going to change China?' " Over the next decade, Parker slowly became a believer, as canny Chinese "netizens" publicized information that the government wanted suppressed.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 4, 1991
HAVANA -- The first gold medal of the 11th Pan American Games went to a man named Cuba yesterday.And he promised to present the prize as a birthday present to Cuban President Fidel Castro.Alberto Cuba, a 29-year-old electronics technician with a long stride, ran through the heat, humidity and smoke belching from an accompanying bus, to win the men's marathon in 2 hours, 19 minutes, 27 seconds.Cuba needed a last burst of speed on the track of the Pan American Stadium to hold off a late rush by Brazil's Jose Carlos Da Santair, who finished second in 2:19.
NEWS
November 3, 1998
An excerpt of a Friday Los Angeles Times editorial: FOR nearly 40 years, U.S. policy toward Cuba has failed to achieve its stated goal of overthrowing Fidel Castro through an embargo on trade and tourism.Relations between Washington and Havana have been iced since Fidel Castro's revolution broke the powerful U.S. influence on the island nation. President John F. Kennedy imposed a total embargo on Cuba in 1962. Once uncomfortable neighbors, the two countries became implacable enemies.More recently, in 1992, Congress passed the Cuban Democracy Act, which prohibited U.S.-owned or -controlled subsidiaries located abroad from doing business with Cuba.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
Speaking of rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, the long-awaited Fourth Communist Party Congress of Cuba decided to legitimize the flourishing private market of plumbers and other individual tradesmen. It shuffled the Central Committee and Politburo to be somewhat younger and more moderate. It called for more exports to hard currency countries ,, and for foreign investment to lure tourists. It wants to increase participation in the one-party political monopoly somewhat. That Fidel Castro's plan to deal with the collapse of world communism and with Cuba's stunning isolation.
NEWS
January 23, 1992
Cuba was acting within its sovereign right in executing Eduardo Diaz Betancourt on Monday. It was also acting in panic.The recent Cuban defector had been caught with two American-based compatriots running arms from a dinghy onto Cuba's north coast. Many regimes would do what Fidel Castro's did. It was reacting not from fear of the Cuban emigre community in Florida, which sponsors these forlorn incursions, but rather from paranoid terror of the impoverished and disillusioned population in Cuba.
NEWS
October 21, 1997
IF FIDEL CASTRO wants to retain credibility as a baseball fan and sometime player, he will let Orlando Hernandez pitch again. Let his country's finest pitcher play the game in the window of youth still open.Orlando, the 28-year-old former star of the Cuban national team, is brother and mentor of Livan Hernandez, 22, who defected and helped the Florida Marlins reach the World Series, winning their first game. Treason, says Cuba's dictator. When Orlando was seen with the cousin of the agent who brokered Livan's get-away, that gentleman was clapped in prison and Orlando was banned from the game for life.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 5, 1999
From little baseball games do mighty cultural exchanges grow.Charm City's newfound buddy-buddy relationship with Fidel Castro's Cuba continues next week, as five representatives from Baltimore arts organizations leave Sunday for Havana to share things cultural with their Caribbean counterparts. The group will be attending the First International Culture and Development Congress, being held under the auspices of UNESCO and UNICEF.Those traveling to Cuba are Steven Baxter, dean of the Peabody Conservatory; Dennis Fiori, director of the Maryland Historical Society; Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies at the Maryland Institute, College of Art; Ted Rouse, chairman of the board of the American Visionary Arts Museum; and Steve Ziger, chairman of the board of the Contemporary Museum.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
For the 22nd consecutive year, on Oct. 29, 2013, the U.S. government was again put to shame at the U.N. General Assembly where 188 countries voted to condemn the U.S. embargo of Cuba. The only two countries that supported the U.S. embargo are the U.S. and Israel - with the interesting fact that Israel has full economic and diplomatic relations with Cuba! This punitive embargo goes back to 1960, and it was put in place with the intent of making the Cuban people suffer so that they would rise up and overthrow their government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 2, 2013
In a rowhouse kitchen near Patterson Park , a small pennant-shaped Cuban flag hangs from a cabinet above a pot of garlic and onions warming in wine, vinegar and water. Smudged and worn, the fringed banner used to hang from the rearview mirror in the Chevy pickup of Octavio Norman, a Havana-born nurse who worked at Mercy Medical Center , lived most of his life in Baltimore, and died here not long after his 59th birthday in January of 2012. Into the garlic and onions, his daughter, Elizabeth "Beth" Norman of South Collington Avenue, soon adds a simmering mix of green tomatoes, sweet red peppers, diced green bell peppers and herbs.
NEWS
By Joel Andreas | May 30, 2013
In his recent speech, President Barack Obama set forth what he described as narrow, reasonable guidelines for using drones to carry out targeted killings overseas. The U.S., he said, will only use drone strikes "against terrorists who pose a continuing and imminent threat to the American people. " Moreover, the U.S. will only act when other governments are unwilling or unable to stop terrorists in their territories and we do not have the ability to capture them. These guidelines still give the U.S. a self-granted license to use remote-controlled planes to kill people at its discretion around the world, and, worse, they further institutionalize this dangerous new type of warfare.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013
Men's soccer U.S. could play in Gold Cup here M&T Bank Stadium will host CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinals July 21 at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m., and one of them could include the United States. The U.S. team will play Belize, Costa Rica and Cuba in the group stage, the Confederation of North, Central America and the Caribbean Association Football announced Wednesday. If it finishes first or second, the U.S. would play in the doubleheader here. The other quarterfinals are set for Atlanta.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
I enjoyed Michael Barnes' commentary ("Time for a new Cuba policy," March 4) in The Sun. I have just recently returned from a "people-to-people" trip to Cuba and found it to be a wonderful opportunity to better understand what is going on in Cuba today. The country has a long and proud, although often bitter, history, but the people were uniformly warm and welcoming. Unlike the Cuban government, they seemed to have extremely positive attitudes toward America and Americans. They would like to see changes in their government and better relations with us but are understandably wary of seeing another American takeover of the island, as happened in the 1950's.
NEWS
By Michael D. Barnes | March 4, 2013
Unfortunately, our nation faces enormous challenges in virtually every region of the globe. In countries ranging from Iran to North Korea to Syria to Mali, and on issues spanning terrorism, drug trafficking, global warming and cyber warfare, each day will bring seemingly impossible problems for our nation's foreign policy leaders, especially new Secretary of State John Kerry. There is one international issue, however, on which genuine progress is not only possible but is likely - if the secretary of state and President Barack Obama are prepared to make this issue a foreign policy priority.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 25, 1994
Paris. -- Only a truly innocent man could say, as President Bill Clinton said on Aug. 19, that all the United States wants for Cuba is that it be swept up in the hemispheric wave of ''democracy and freedom.''Mr. Clinton surely wishes Cubans well, but history contradicts him. The historical American relationship to the Cuban nation has been anything but a struggle for Cuba's liberation. The events of recent days are Cuba's revenge for that history.Fidel Castro has a victory. He has compelled Mr. Clinton to reverse an American policy that, since the Cuban Refugee Act of 1966, gave automatic U.S. entry to anyone leaving Cuba.
NEWS
August 10, 1994
The riot against the Fidel Castro regime last Friday in Havana brought protest to a new level of openness in Communist Cuba. Cuba is unraveling. Nothing works. The economy is creaking to a halt. People are desperate. There is a question how much longer this can go on.But Mr. Castro will survive this week and next week. The orchestrated demonstration Sunday in support of his regime was more than ten times larger. Mr. Castro and the Communists he has kept in power since 1958 still monopolize power, communications and patronage in Cuban society.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
As Alan Gross neared his third anniversary behind bars in Cuba, his wife gave new details of his deteriorating health and issued an impassioned plea to officials in Washington and Havana to negotiate his release immediately. Judy Gross, who visited her husband in September, said the Montgomery County man has lost 110 pounds since his arrest in December 2009, is suffering chronic pain from degenerative arthritis and now has a mass behind one shoulder. She said their American radiologist has told her the growth could be cancerous and should be assumed to be malignant until tested and proved otherwise.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
For anyone growing up in the 1950s, black-and-white television images of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev threatening Western leaders with his "We will bury you!" statement were more than a little frightening. In an era when communism and the nuclear arms race were considered palpable and real threats, schoolchildren throughout the country were instructed about what to do in the event of a nuclear attack. As Civil Defense sirens whined in air raid drills that seemed to me to be held several times a year, we were instructed by our teachers at my central New Jersey elementary school to climb under our desks, as if they were a bulwark and haven from radiation and flying debris.
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