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NEWS
September 29, 1991
Custom Telemarketing Services Inc., a telemarketing service agency based in Columbia, has won the Governor's Award for being one of the most successful small businesses in the state. CTS received the award in the category of Product Development.The firm was nominated forthe award by the National Association of Women Business Owners and the Anne Arundel Trade Council.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Rick Popely and Rick Popely,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 2006
WARREN, Mich. -- As Robert A. "Bob" Lutz walks briskly from studio to studio at the General Motors Design Center, it's clear he is charged up. "Wait till you see what they're doing in here," he says. "This is where the creativity is, in design." After years of stifling management and a risk-averse culture, the design inmates reportedly are running the asylum under Lutz, GM's 74-year-old vice chairman and global product czar. Lutz says empowered designers are creating eye-catching cars and trucks, which could be key to the survival and turnaround of the ailing automaker.
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NEWS
March 13, 2000
Digital Publishing Group to expand, hire in Howard Massachusetts-based Digital Scanning Inc. has announced plans to designate its new division, Digital Publishing Group, as the mid-Atlantic sales and marketing office. Rod Brewer will oversee the division, which is now operated from his home office in Ellicott City. The Digital Publishing Group plans to find office space in Howard County and hire support staff. The company scans historical out-of-print-books and documents and converts them into "eBooks" according to topic, such as Abraham Lincoln, Civil War narratives, Union generals.
NEWS
March 13, 2000
Digital Publishing Group to expand, hire in Howard Massachusetts-based Digital Scanning Inc. has announced plans to designate its new division, Digital Publishing Group, as the mid-Atlantic sales and marketing office. Rod Brewer will oversee the division, which is now operated from his home office in Ellicott City. The Digital Publishing Group plans to find office space in Howard County and hire support staff. The company scans historical out-of-print-books and documents and converts them into "eBooks" according to topic, such as Abraham Lincoln, Civil War narratives, Union generals.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
The telemarketing industry takes a bashing, earned largely by a minority of "scam artists" and zealous sales hustlers who populate the business, admits Columbia entrepreneur Malynda Hawes Madzel."
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 24, 1990
Of the myriad occupational diseases and ailments found in the modern workplace, perhaps none has received as much attention in the last decade as carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful swelling of the tendons and nerves in the hand and wrist.The media has depicted the ailment as an unfortunate product of the Information Age, where computer keyboards and other repetitive workplace tasks force workers' wrists and hands into the same awkward motions hundreds or thousands of times a day.But Dr. Louis B. Halikman, a Baltimore orthopedist with an interest in industrial orthopedic problems, remembers one baffling case of the syndrome in which he could find nothing in one patient's average workday routine that would explain the ache in his hands and wrists.
BUSINESS
By Rick Popely and Rick Popely,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 2006
WARREN, Mich. -- As Robert A. "Bob" Lutz walks briskly from studio to studio at the General Motors Design Center, it's clear he is charged up. "Wait till you see what they're doing in here," he says. "This is where the creativity is, in design." After years of stifling management and a risk-averse culture, the design inmates reportedly are running the asylum under Lutz, GM's 74-year-old vice chairman and global product czar. Lutz says empowered designers are creating eye-catching cars and trucks, which could be key to the survival and turnaround of the ailing automaker.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
A rainy, chilly January day in Carroll County.Not a day to be playing outside, but a time to be sitting inside, near a roaring fire. Or to be bowling.Inside Thunderhead Westminster Lanes, there was no hint of the dreary winter day, just wall-to-wall enthusiasm. The Saturday morningyouth leagues were bowling.If you've ever been near a school when the kids are turned loose at the end of the day you have some idea of the noise, the excitement -- the pure fun -- that was generated bythese youngsters.
NEWS
August 19, 1994
Jim Speros is fighting the good fight, but it is probably a forlorn one. Anywhere but in the mind of a cold-hearted Midwestern judge, the football name Colts belongs to Baltimore.And that's the problem. The man who owns the name under the law absconded with it to Indianapolis.Arguments that people would be confused by a National Football League Colts in Indianapolis and a Canadian Football League Colts in Baltimore are so much legalistic mumbo-jumbo. The real threat to the duplicitous NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue and his greedy co-conspirator Robert Irsay is the likelihood that fans would buy souvenirs with the logo of an exciting CFL Colts team rather than that of those stumblebums in Indiana.
FEATURES
By ARLENE EHRLICH | September 29, 1991
IT HAD TO HAPPEN. AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL IS SU-ing the Nintendo company because playing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles gave her carpal tunnel syndrome.That's the kind of page 10 story that most newspaper readers file under "whimsy: insignificant." But it's a symptom of a growing national problem.It's no longer news that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a potentially crippling disorder of the wrists and hands, affects millions of office and factory workers across the country and leaves product manufacturers, employers and insurers vulnerable to billions of dollars in liability and compensation claims.
NEWS
August 19, 1994
Jim Speros is fighting the good fight, but it is probably a forlorn one. Anywhere but in the mind of a cold-hearted Midwestern judge, the football name Colts belongs to Baltimore.And that's the problem. The man who owns the name under the law absconded with it to Indianapolis.Arguments that people would be confused by a National Football League Colts in Indianapolis and a Canadian Football League Colts in Baltimore are so much legalistic mumbo-jumbo. The real threat to the duplicitous NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue and his greedy co-conspirator Robert Irsay is the likelihood that fans would buy souvenirs with the logo of an exciting CFL Colts team rather than that of those stumblebums in Indiana.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
The telemarketing industry takes a bashing, earned largely by a minority of "scam artists" and zealous sales hustlers who populate the business, admits Columbia entrepreneur Malynda Hawes Madzel."
NEWS
September 29, 1991
Custom Telemarketing Services Inc., a telemarketing service agency based in Columbia, has won the Governor's Award for being one of the most successful small businesses in the state. CTS received the award in the category of Product Development.The firm was nominated forthe award by the National Association of Women Business Owners and the Anne Arundel Trade Council.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
A rainy, chilly January day in Carroll County.Not a day to be playing outside, but a time to be sitting inside, near a roaring fire. Or to be bowling.Inside Thunderhead Westminster Lanes, there was no hint of the dreary winter day, just wall-to-wall enthusiasm. The Saturday morningyouth leagues were bowling.If you've ever been near a school when the kids are turned loose at the end of the day you have some idea of the noise, the excitement -- the pure fun -- that was generated bythese youngsters.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | December 24, 1990
Of the myriad occupational diseases and ailments found in the modern workplace, perhaps none has received as much attention in the last decade as carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful swelling of the tendons and nerves in the hand and wrist.The media has depicted the ailment as an unfortunate product of the Information Age, where computer keyboards and other repetitive workplace tasks force workers' wrists and hands into the same awkward motions hundreds or thousands of times a day.But Dr. Louis B. Halikman, a Baltimore orthopedist with an interest in industrial orthopedic problems, remembers one baffling case of the syndrome in which he could find nothing in one patient's average workday routine that would explain the ache in his hands and wrists.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
The driver of a pickup truck failed to slow down for traffic on Interstate 97 in Anne Arundel County and hit a 2000 black Honda Accord just before 4 p.m. Friday, killing the Honda's driver, according to Maryland State Police. He was identified by police Saturday as 49-year-old Stephen T. Patterson of Hampstead. The accident caused the southbound lanes of I-97 to be closed for three hours. Police said 29-year-old Daniel Martin Harris of Worton, who was driving a 2003 green Ford F-250, failed to slow down on the southbound side of the highway at the spur to eastbound U.S. Route 50 and collided with the Honda.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | October 15, 1992
The Carroll Transit System's board of directors has decided to use the next 90 days to assess options that might permit the financially troubled service to continue.The board met yesterday and decided to keep up operations at least until Jan. 15, 1993, paying current creditors while talking with county and community leaders about ways to cover the cost of continued operations.Carroll Transit System is under financial stress because of declining revenues. The system, which consists of 17 vans that serve riders of all ages, including many disabled people, runs more than 7,043 trips per year.
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